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Fuzzy Logic: The Revolutionary Computer Technology That Is Changing Our World

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Imagine a technology so revolutionary that it gives computers the ability to make decisions more like human beings. Professor Lofti Zadeh masterminded "fuzzy logic"--a way of programming computers to "make decisions" bases on imprecise data and complex situations. In "Fuzzy Logic," Daniel McNeill and Paul Freiberger relate the compelling tale of this remarkable new technol Imagine a technology so revolutionary that it gives computers the ability to make decisions more like human beings. Professor Lofti Zadeh masterminded "fuzzy logic"--a way of programming computers to "make decisions" bases on imprecise data and complex situations. In "Fuzzy Logic," Daniel McNeill and Paul Freiberger relate the compelling tale of this remarkable new technology, the genius who brought it to life, and how it will soon affect the lives of every one of us.


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Imagine a technology so revolutionary that it gives computers the ability to make decisions more like human beings. Professor Lofti Zadeh masterminded "fuzzy logic"--a way of programming computers to "make decisions" bases on imprecise data and complex situations. In "Fuzzy Logic," Daniel McNeill and Paul Freiberger relate the compelling tale of this remarkable new technol Imagine a technology so revolutionary that it gives computers the ability to make decisions more like human beings. Professor Lofti Zadeh masterminded "fuzzy logic"--a way of programming computers to "make decisions" bases on imprecise data and complex situations. In "Fuzzy Logic," Daniel McNeill and Paul Freiberger relate the compelling tale of this remarkable new technology, the genius who brought it to life, and how it will soon affect the lives of every one of us.

30 review for Fuzzy Logic: The Revolutionary Computer Technology That Is Changing Our World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    Very interesting, but not enough "hard" details for technically-minded readers, who will want to follow up with other reading. Very interesting, but not enough "hard" details for technically-minded readers, who will want to follow up with other reading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    Not quite enough detail on how fuzzy logic works, and now a little dated, but an interesting mathematical tale nonetheless.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alex Lee

    This is my second, perhaps third time reading the book but the first time I read it in many decades. How the world has changed! Fuzzy logic is used today, embedded in computer science, although I am not certain that people see this rightly then or now. One of the most interesting aspects of this book is its argument to legitimatize something that people otherwise either seek to dismiss without understanding it -- or seek to downplay. The reasons why are speculation, perhaps, but this reminds us t This is my second, perhaps third time reading the book but the first time I read it in many decades. How the world has changed! Fuzzy logic is used today, embedded in computer science, although I am not certain that people see this rightly then or now. One of the most interesting aspects of this book is its argument to legitimatize something that people otherwise either seek to dismiss without understanding it -- or seek to downplay. The reasons why are speculation, perhaps, but this reminds us that people are not purely rational and that any endeavor we seek to pursue comes with it a political end -- who gets to speak, who gets to do -- what attention is worthy. I don't have much to add about the math, computer or logic that this book is about. Most likely much of it is dated as it was written in the early 90s before the dawn of data science. But what remains with this is the lesson that should someone identify with their tools, they will then become blind/entangled with those tools. At some point if you identify with your tools too much then you become the tool.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Good for its time. Thirty years on, you need to research what has happened. If you do have a good follow-on book, leave a comment, please.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    Classical logic forces all actions to be described by a rigid sequence of two option rules. By applying enough such rules, it is possible to eventually reach a reasonable approximation to the problem in question. However, such a method is cumbersome at best, so in 1964, Lotfi Zadeh, a professor of electrical engineering, invented a new reasoning system base on imprecise rules. Since the values are now placed within specified ranges, the system was given the unfortunate name "fuzzy." Eventually Classical logic forces all actions to be described by a rigid sequence of two option rules. By applying enough such rules, it is possible to eventually reach a reasonable approximation to the problem in question. However, such a method is cumbersome at best, so in 1964, Lotfi Zadeh, a professor of electrical engineering, invented a new reasoning system base on imprecise rules. Since the values are now placed within specified ranges, the system was given the unfortunate name "fuzzy." Eventually ignored and at times vilified by the academic community in the United States, fuzzy logic is now beginning to be widely used in commercial products. In another instance of what seems to be the most common business theme of the decade of the '80s, it was Japanese industry that took the American ideas and made them commercially viable. Many products now incorporate fuzzy reasoning systems, with no end in sight regarding the spectrum of applications. The performance gains of fuzzy logic over other options is at times astounding. Equally surprising is the simplicity of fuzzy reasoning. Most events in the human experience are not sharply demarcated. Night does not "fall," but slowly floats down like an aging helium balloon. Fuzzy systems mimic this by assigning a numeric value to qualifying words such as "very," "slightly," and "remotely." The most common scale uses the range from zero to one inclusive. Since zero can be considered FALSE and one TRUE, classical logic is a limiting subset of fuzzy logic. For example, the phrase "very possible" could be assigned a truth value of 0.90, "slightly possible" a value of 0.05, and "remotely possible" a value of 0.005. Fuzzy OR then takes the largest value of the two variable, AND the minimum of the two and the negation is computed by taking one minus the fuzzy value. This book introduces the basic notions of fuzziness, but concentrates more on the history as an ignored discipline and the recent commercial successes. It is amazing to learn that the vast majority of "fuzzy thinkers" are found in Asia. Comparisons between the differences in Western and Eastern philosophy are made in an attempt to explain this. For example, the Japanese language is inherently much vaguer than western languages. If you are interested in learning the first notions of fuzzy reasoning, this book is a good non-technical place to start. And if the applications continue to grow, that interest may become a required taste. Published in Journal of Recreational Mathematics, reprinted with permission and this review also appears on Amazon

  6. 5 out of 5

    Pumpkinpi

    This book is great! The authors of Fuzzy Logic explain the history and the many uses of fuzzy logic clearly and concisely. It is really fun to explore the history of such a fascinating new science, and the book also does a good job going into the modern applications. My only problem with the book is that the authors fail to explain precisely what fuzzy logic is. If I had not already understood fuzzy logic before I read the book, I would barely have enjoyed it at all.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sage

    Again, it's been years since I read this, but I learned how Japanese trains can slow down very quickly and still be smooth and how cameras are programmed to avoid shaky hands. They figured out how to have a percentage on/off switch. Not just 1111 or 0000 (which mean on or off in bit language or something..hey I'm an arts person), but part of that. Great reading for the scientifically curious but unskilled! Again, it's been years since I read this, but I learned how Japanese trains can slow down very quickly and still be smooth and how cameras are programmed to avoid shaky hands. They figured out how to have a percentage on/off switch. Not just 1111 or 0000 (which mean on or off in bit language or something..hey I'm an arts person), but part of that. Great reading for the scientifically curious but unskilled!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Great intro to Fuzzy Logic: This was the first fuzzy book I read. Just picked it up randomly, wondering what fuzzy is all about. It's easy to understand, non-technical, and very enlightening. If you are curious about fuzzy logic, or want to explore what could result in a major step forward in machine "intellegence" check out this book. I only gave it an 8 (not 10) because Kosko's "Fuzzy Thinking" is the best I've read. This book is not on the same level, but still very good. Great intro to Fuzzy Logic: This was the first fuzzy book I read. Just picked it up randomly, wondering what fuzzy is all about. It's easy to understand, non-technical, and very enlightening. If you are curious about fuzzy logic, or want to explore what could result in a major step forward in machine "intellegence" check out this book. I only gave it an 8 (not 10) because Kosko's "Fuzzy Thinking" is the best I've read. This book is not on the same level, but still very good.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Viet Phuong

    Somehow over-dramatizing the birth, struggle, and rise of fuzzy logic with not enough understandable explanation, the book seemed to be written by two "hard-core" fans of fuzzy logic and was thus lack a decent degree of neutrality as a scientific non-fiction. Somehow over-dramatizing the birth, struggle, and rise of fuzzy logic with not enough understandable explanation, the book seemed to be written by two "hard-core" fans of fuzzy logic and was thus lack a decent degree of neutrality as a scientific non-fiction.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chris Tabor

    definitely a good read, though very little technical aspects are covered, and it mostly centers around the history of how fuzzy logic came to be.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mzd

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nick Black

  14. 4 out of 5

    John

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rick

  16. 5 out of 5

    Paul Turcotte

  17. 5 out of 5

    Hanna

    This made me nostalgic for the 90's. But I didn't learn what I wanted from it. This made me nostalgic for the 90's. But I didn't learn what I wanted from it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    TS S. Fulk

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shabbir

  21. 5 out of 5

    Keith Clasen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kaz

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cristina Laz─âr

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aksej

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jasper

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  28. 4 out of 5

    Suhail Khan

  29. 4 out of 5

    Terry Dyke

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

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