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Children of the Longhouse

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When Ohkwa'ri overhears a group of older boys planning a raid on a neighboring village, he immediately tells his Mohawk elders. He has done the right thing—but he has also made enemies. Grabber and his friends will do anything they can to hurt him, especially during the village-wide game of Tekwaarathon (lacrosse). Ohkwa'ri believes in the path of peace, but can peaceful w When Ohkwa'ri overhears a group of older boys planning a raid on a neighboring village, he immediately tells his Mohawk elders. He has done the right thing—but he has also made enemies. Grabber and his friends will do anything they can to hurt him, especially during the village-wide game of Tekwaarathon (lacrosse). Ohkwa'ri believes in the path of peace, but can peaceful ways work against Grabber's wrath? "An exciting story that also offers an in-depth look at Native American life centuries ago." — Kirkus Reviews "Eloquently conveys how democracy, respect, and justice are integral components of the Native American's religion and government....Readers will come away from this novel with a broadened awareness of a nearly vanished culture." —Publishers Weekly


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When Ohkwa'ri overhears a group of older boys planning a raid on a neighboring village, he immediately tells his Mohawk elders. He has done the right thing—but he has also made enemies. Grabber and his friends will do anything they can to hurt him, especially during the village-wide game of Tekwaarathon (lacrosse). Ohkwa'ri believes in the path of peace, but can peaceful w When Ohkwa'ri overhears a group of older boys planning a raid on a neighboring village, he immediately tells his Mohawk elders. He has done the right thing—but he has also made enemies. Grabber and his friends will do anything they can to hurt him, especially during the village-wide game of Tekwaarathon (lacrosse). Ohkwa'ri believes in the path of peace, but can peaceful ways work against Grabber's wrath? "An exciting story that also offers an in-depth look at Native American life centuries ago." — Kirkus Reviews "Eloquently conveys how democracy, respect, and justice are integral components of the Native American's religion and government....Readers will come away from this novel with a broadened awareness of a nearly vanished culture." —Publishers Weekly

30 review for Children of the Longhouse

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    A little slow in spots, but a fascinating look at Native American culture before the Europeans settler's came to America. A little slow in spots, but a fascinating look at Native American culture before the Europeans settler's came to America.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brenna

    Great book-Bruchac is a true storyteller. Ohkwa'ri, a young boy of the Mohawk tribe, overhears other boys planning trouble. Ohkwa'ri and his twin sister go to the elders with the news. During a council meeting, a game of Lacrosse (Tekaarathon) is planned. Ohwa'ri's team plays opposite those who now want to cause him trouble. Bruchac vividly describes the environment in and around the Mohawk village and their activities. His words jumped off the page into clear, brilliant and colorful pictures in my Great book-Bruchac is a true storyteller. Ohkwa'ri, a young boy of the Mohawk tribe, overhears other boys planning trouble. Ohkwa'ri and his twin sister go to the elders with the news. During a council meeting, a game of Lacrosse (Tekaarathon) is planned. Ohwa'ri's team plays opposite those who now want to cause him trouble. Bruchac vividly describes the environment in and around the Mohawk village and their activities. His words jumped off the page into clear, brilliant and colorful pictures in my head. Ohkwa'ri's attentiveness to what is happening shines as the story continues. The energy seemed to jump off the page during the lacrosse game. I felt I was hearing Bruchac's story rather than reading it. Bruchac does use Mohawk language in the novel, and does give explanation of the words throughout. He also includes a pronunciation guide at the end. I would definitely recommend this book, especially for a kid (boy or girl) who is interested in sports.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah B

    Of the two children's books I read today I definitely preferred this one! The words flowed smoothly and the story itself was very captivating. I soon found myself caught up in Ohkwa'ri's life and the trouble he had gotten himself into with a bully. I think it's safe to call Grabber a bully as he certainly wanted to harm Ohkwa'ri. Right from the very beginning I knew he was going to have problems with Grabber and I was right! The ending was very surprising however...it works great for the story b Of the two children's books I read today I definitely preferred this one! The words flowed smoothly and the story itself was very captivating. I soon found myself caught up in Ohkwa'ri's life and the trouble he had gotten himself into with a bully. I think it's safe to call Grabber a bully as he certainly wanted to harm Ohkwa'ri. Right from the very beginning I knew he was going to have problems with Grabber and I was right! The ending was very surprising however...it works great for the story but unfortunately in real life things very rarely actually work that way. Bullies don't change. One thing I found the most interesting in here was the life and culture of the Mohawks. The map and family tree at the beginning of the book was also very useful! I'm glad the author had thought to include it, otherwise I wouldn't know that the Mohawk was part of the Iroquois Nation. Reading the book also spurred me to go do a few searches on Google to see what the different types of homes looked like, although I have seen ones built here at our Indian Summer festival. The form of discipline mentioned in the book is very curious. And very different too.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    Set after the founding of the Iroquois Confederacy, and before the arrival of European settlers, Children of the Longhouse follows the story of twin brother and sister Ohkwa'ri and Otsi:stia, two eleven-year-old Mohawk children. When Ohkwa'ri overhears another young boy planning a foolhardy raid against the neighboring Anen:taks people, his actions prevent disaster, but also earn him some enemies. Will they take their revenge during the next Tekwaarathon (lacrosse) game, and if so, what can Ohkw Set after the founding of the Iroquois Confederacy, and before the arrival of European settlers, Children of the Longhouse follows the story of twin brother and sister Ohkwa'ri and Otsi:stia, two eleven-year-old Mohawk children. When Ohkwa'ri overhears another young boy planning a foolhardy raid against the neighboring Anen:taks people, his actions prevent disaster, but also earn him some enemies. Will they take their revenge during the next Tekwaarathon (lacrosse) game, and if so, what can Ohkwa'ri and Otsi:stia do about it? This is historical fiction at its best - an exciting fast-paced narrative, joined to a historically accurate portrayal of the culture of the Haudenosaunee ("People Building a Longhouse"). A wonderful novel, both engaging and informative, it is suitable for middle grade readers, and would make an excellent introduction to a unit on the Iroquois, or pre-contact American history.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia

    Children of the Longhouse by Joseph Bruchac is about an 11 year old Native American boy named Ohkwa'ri. When Ohkwa'ri overhears Grabber (an older boy from Ohkwa'ri's village) and his minions planning a raid on a neighboring village, Ohkwa'ri decides the right thing to do is to tell the leaders of his village. Grabber is mad at Ohkwa'ri, (as you can imagine) and a VERY rough lacrosse-like game is going to take place. Yet, the two are on opposing teams! Find out what happens next in Children of Children of the Longhouse by Joseph Bruchac is about an 11 year old Native American boy named Ohkwa'ri. When Ohkwa'ri overhears Grabber (an older boy from Ohkwa'ri's village) and his minions planning a raid on a neighboring village, Ohkwa'ri decides the right thing to do is to tell the leaders of his village. Grabber is mad at Ohkwa'ri, (as you can imagine) and a VERY rough lacrosse-like game is going to take place. Yet, the two are on opposing teams! Find out what happens next in Children of the Longhouse by Joseph Bruchac. I thought this book was very interesting. It was very suspenseful and and a great way to learn more about the Native American lifestyle. I would recommend this book to someone who likes historical fiction and suspenseful adventures.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Wolf

    Two words: Dumpster fire This book is... terrible. Awful. Trash. The author should be ashamed he wrote it. The plot? Imagine your favorite book's plot line as roller coaster. Lots of bumps and high points, then dropping 50 meters, right? If this book's plot line was a roller coaster, it would go up 10 meters then be completely flat for a good 5 minutes, then stop, then go up 2 meters and stop there. The characters are less likable then a teacher who assignes homework every night and weekend, and Two words: Dumpster fire This book is... terrible. Awful. Trash. The author should be ashamed he wrote it. The plot? Imagine your favorite book's plot line as roller coaster. Lots of bumps and high points, then dropping 50 meters, right? If this book's plot line was a roller coaster, it would go up 10 meters then be completely flat for a good 5 minutes, then stop, then go up 2 meters and stop there. The characters are less likable then a teacher who assignes homework every night and weekend, and its message can only be interpreted as "Don't buy Joseph Bruchac books." Don't let the start of this book fool you. You will soon be wondering why Bruchac thought this was at all a good piece of writing and what time you should return it. This is my least favorite book of all time, and I wish that I had never read it. This book is the reason kids aren't reading in our country.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Charsia

    I read this alongside learning about American history, and how it affected different people in the 'New World.' I got to read this particular book, which gave me a nice insight into how tribes back in the late 15th century would've lived, particularly a Mohawk Village. It was also a really exciting story, seeing how Ohkwa'ri would respond and react to the enemies he made, when he found out they were planning to raid a nearby village and told the village elders of their plots. (The story takes pl I read this alongside learning about American history, and how it affected different people in the 'New World.' I got to read this particular book, which gave me a nice insight into how tribes back in the late 15th century would've lived, particularly a Mohawk Village. It was also a really exciting story, seeing how Ohkwa'ri would respond and react to the enemies he made, when he found out they were planning to raid a nearby village and told the village elders of their plots. (The story takes place after the Great League of Peace was formed.) and seeing how the main characters Ohkwa'ri and Otsi:stia, two 11 year old twins, who try to do the right thing even when it gets hard, was really amazing to read about. This book Is a really good insight into Native American culture and I recommend you to check it out!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Klaudia Poka

    It might seem simple and superficial, but the book has beautiful lessons. The connection between people and nature is truly amazing and very important. This book felt like a relaxing walk in a big forest.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

    Read this one with the kids. They enjoyed the build up to the Tekwaarathon game. I enjoyed the exposure to a life lived among one of the Iroquois Nations.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Learned a great deal about the Five Nations of the Iroquois- helpful since I didn’t grow up in WNY.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cathy aka The Attached Mama

    This is a really great book that teaches a lot about Native American culture. The story is slow and peaceful but picks up at the end with an exciting sporting event. The ending brought tears to my eyes, and I am NOT a sentimental person.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    Children of the Longhouse Bruchac, Joseph The Children of the Longhouse is a mixture of real Native American people living today, and mythology an classic Mohawk characters of the past. It is an engaging story of a young set of twins at the verge of adulthood and how they have to face many small hurtles to achieve their desires. Ohkwa`ri and Otsi:stia are twins that learn that leaning on each other they can overcome many of their problems. Ohkwa`ri is an intelligent boy who learns that if he is p Children of the Longhouse Bruchac, Joseph The Children of the Longhouse is a mixture of real Native American people living today, and mythology an classic Mohawk characters of the past. It is an engaging story of a young set of twins at the verge of adulthood and how they have to face many small hurtles to achieve their desires. Ohkwa`ri and Otsi:stia are twins that learn that leaning on each other they can overcome many of their problems. Ohkwa`ri is an intelligent boy who learns that if he is patient and does not run head long into things, listens not only to his elders but his older twin sister Otsi:stia he will survive many of his difficulties. The twins biggest problem is Grabber an angry young orphan who see the younger Ohkwa`ri as a rival. Grabber is a determined young man who wants to use his power and influence to gain a reputation. His first plan to invade the Anen:taks` tribe and kill to achieve his glory is thwarted by Ohkwa`ri who tells his elders of the plan. Grabbers many acts of revenge for this averted attack cause problems for the twins. But it is the connections and intelligence of the twins that makes Grabbers life better in the end.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Penny

    While I have to admit the plot of this story is a little dry and the story moves slowly, I think this book does a fantastic job at giving a peek into what life may have been like previous to the colonization of America and the impact of the Europeans. It's a pretty decent read and I can't wait to share this one with my kids. The story doesn't do a whole lot of meandering, and with the threat of war with a neighboring community being so early in the book, one would think the book would be filled w While I have to admit the plot of this story is a little dry and the story moves slowly, I think this book does a fantastic job at giving a peek into what life may have been like previous to the colonization of America and the impact of the Europeans. It's a pretty decent read and I can't wait to share this one with my kids. The story doesn't do a whole lot of meandering, and with the threat of war with a neighboring community being so early in the book, one would think the book would be filled with more intrigue or action, but the whole thing is relatively slow. Even when you get to the point of the game, in spite of the action, the story moves slowly and deliberately. This jives well with the patient, deliberate nature the elder characters display in the book, and what they model for the kids in the story, so it's almost a fitting tone and theme. The story in that regard is well crafted in that it delivers a very specific feel, which I think is beautifully done, but it doesn't make for an engaging read or the kind of book you just can't put down. Because I am the kind of person I am, I'm a big fact checker when it comes to historic fictions for my kids, especially anything we plan to use for homeschooling. I couldn't resist checking much of what was written against what I could find easily on the web. The only thing I found that didn't match facts was the pemmican, given there's never mention of maple sugar, especially not as a preservative, and the use of blueberries in particular seems most commonly referenced as being used for special occasions, but beyond that, the facts held up to digging I did. Overall I'm pretty happy with it in that regard, and I think it's definitely a valuable addition to any homeschooling or educational program that covers the lives of the Native peoples of America, or the world that existed in America prior to the "discovery" in 1492.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Esther Filbrun

    This is a very unique book! I’ve read several books with Native American main characters, but none quite like this one. It came up in an American History course I have been working through for a while, and I’m pretty impressed. Joseph Bruchac has done something that I consider particularly difficult: He wrote a book about a time period and place most of us these days know little or nothing about. AND he managed to do that without making the characters act like 21st-century children dropped into a This is a very unique book! I’ve read several books with Native American main characters, but none quite like this one. It came up in an American History course I have been working through for a while, and I’m pretty impressed. Joseph Bruchac has done something that I consider particularly difficult: He wrote a book about a time period and place most of us these days know little or nothing about. AND he managed to do that without making the characters act like 21st-century children dropped into a 15th-century setting! Ohkwa’ri and Otsi:stia’s story gripped me from just about the first page, and I ended up finishing this book in a day—granted, it isn’t very long, and I did have time that day, but it was good. I felt like this book transported me back to a time period when all the American plains knew was Indian tribes living their lives their own way with their own customs and ways of doing things. I don’t necessarily think everything they did was right, but it was an interesting portrait of a long ago time. The plot itself was interesting, too. I loved seeing the children grow through the story, and the description of the lacrosse game was fascinating. If you’re looking for a good, fairly clean book about what life may have looked like for the Indians hundreds of years ago, I’d recommend this book. It’s a good one.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Saradha Sukavanam

    This is the first book that I have read, set around Native American nations. The plot was very simple and it revolved around Ohkwari, a boy from the bear clan of the Mohawk tribe who overhears a group of older kids plotting to attack another tribe. He reports it to his elders and the rest of the story is predictable. Rather than the main plot, I loved the stories that were shared throughout the book. The stories of animals, stories of Lacrosse (Tekwaarathon) among animals, strawberry picking. Th This is the first book that I have read, set around Native American nations. The plot was very simple and it revolved around Ohkwari, a boy from the bear clan of the Mohawk tribe who overhears a group of older kids plotting to attack another tribe. He reports it to his elders and the rest of the story is predictable. Rather than the main plot, I loved the stories that were shared throughout the book. The stories of animals, stories of Lacrosse (Tekwaarathon) among animals, strawberry picking. They fed their souls with stories and you want to time travel just to sit around the fire and hear them share stories. Having lived in WNY for 10 years, it was nice to read about the tribes from the Niagara and finger lakes region. The names of different characters, Falls a lot, Grabber, Greasy hair, She opens the sky, two ideas, are all intriguing and I am sure kids would love these characters and their unique names and the deep connection that runs between the name and a person's character. The characters in the story, show a lot of gratitude and reverence to nature around them. Women were treated respect and in leadership roles throughout all decisions made and they appointed leaders for peace keeping among the different tribes. A lot to learn from for the modern day world. Looking forward to read more of Joseph Bruchac and a must read for upper elementary kids/Middle schoolers who want a glimpse into the Native American life centuries before.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Heather O'Neill

    This is a story of twin 11-year old Mohawk children Ohkwa'ri and Otsi:stia. Ohkwa'ri is outside one day and he hears some other boys that are a little bit older than him plan a raid on a neighboring tribe. Ohkwa'ri decides that he must tells the leaders of his clan about this, which he does. In doing so, the other boys want revenge on Ohkwa'ri for telling on them. Ohkwa'ri and his sister try to figure out how to make peace with those boys before they hurt Ohkwa'ri. We read this book as part of o This is a story of twin 11-year old Mohawk children Ohkwa'ri and Otsi:stia. Ohkwa'ri is outside one day and he hears some other boys that are a little bit older than him plan a raid on a neighboring tribe. Ohkwa'ri decides that he must tells the leaders of his clan about this, which he does. In doing so, the other boys want revenge on Ohkwa'ri for telling on them. Ohkwa'ri and his sister try to figure out how to make peace with those boys before they hurt Ohkwa'ri. We read this book as part of our homeschool curriculum to go along with learning about Indigenous People. The story does talk about the life of Indigenous People and the group dynamics. It goes into their game of Tekwaarathon (lacrosse) a lot. The other parts of the book is mostly dealing with young kids navigating their way to adulthood. My boys and I enjoyed this book, but it wasn't our favorite. It was kind of slow going and my boys were not asking for me to read this book. The author is a Native author, so that is a plus. There is also a key at the back of the book that sounds out how each non-English word should be pronounced, which was very helpful to me! The book wasn't horrible and if you are trying to have your kids read more Native People books that are entertaining then this book would definitely fit that.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Beth Anne

    This was a wonderful book! I am really perplexed that it has so many negative reviews. The book is short at just 140 pages, but the characters are well developed. I love that the main characters are 11 year old boy/girl twins, which really makes this a book in which any child can see themselves. The first half of the book is focused on every day life in a Mohawk longhouse in the late 1400s. Sometimes the information comes in a bit of a forced ways, though someone's memory, but everything is so lo This was a wonderful book! I am really perplexed that it has so many negative reviews. The book is short at just 140 pages, but the characters are well developed. I love that the main characters are 11 year old boy/girl twins, which really makes this a book in which any child can see themselves. The first half of the book is focused on every day life in a Mohawk longhouse in the late 1400s. Sometimes the information comes in a bit of a forced ways, though someone's memory, but everything is so lovingly and beautifully told that it didn't bother me. I loved learning about so many aspects of Native culture - their stories and traditions, their religious beliefs, how they see themselves as part of community with each other and the earth, their government, respect for people and property, and the good of the group. Though how the characters act the reader gets a look at what it means to be purposeful, to be slow to speak and quick to listen, to respect others, to take responsibility, and to be part of something bigger. The pronunciation was a struggle, but I tabbed the guide in the back of the book and referenced it frequently. I am looking forward to teaching this book for school this year.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    This was the first read-aloud literature book of the school year for my 9 and 10 year old’s homeschool curriculum, which focuses on US History. Although a little slow at times, the fact that my kiddos (even my reluctant reader) loved it so much increased my enjoyment for the story. We read it one chapter at a time over the course of two weeks, and they were always excited to start reading the next day to see what would happen next. I struggled with quite a bit of the pronunciation but tried my b This was the first read-aloud literature book of the school year for my 9 and 10 year old’s homeschool curriculum, which focuses on US History. Although a little slow at times, the fact that my kiddos (even my reluctant reader) loved it so much increased my enjoyment for the story. We read it one chapter at a time over the course of two weeks, and they were always excited to start reading the next day to see what would happen next. I struggled with quite a bit of the pronunciation but tried my best, and was really glad for the pronunciation guide in the back to help a momma out. It’s full of wonderful storytelling and imagery, while also containing great lessons, especially for the younger kiddos.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    We've been reading a lot of more recently released books lately and I am so glad this was assigned as part of our Language Arts curriculum. Both my 9 yr old and I enjoyed learning about the life of the Bear Clan and following along Ohkwa'ri as he manages the early transition to being a man. The history & information about the daily lives of the native americans prompted some good discussions as well. We've been reading a lot of more recently released books lately and I am so glad this was assigned as part of our Language Arts curriculum. Both my 9 yr old and I enjoyed learning about the life of the Bear Clan and following along Ohkwa'ri as he manages the early transition to being a man. The history & information about the daily lives of the native americans prompted some good discussions as well.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I liked the descriptions of the customs and cultural landscape of the Mohawk and other Iroquois nations. I so appreciate a historical novel that takes place before 1492. That's what I was looking for right now. I wish it focused more evenly on the sister and brother, rather than just the brother. I felt her story got started, but wasn't given enough closure in the end. I liked the descriptions of the customs and cultural landscape of the Mohawk and other Iroquois nations. I so appreciate a historical novel that takes place before 1492. That's what I was looking for right now. I wish it focused more evenly on the sister and brother, rather than just the brother. I felt her story got started, but wasn't given enough closure in the end.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    This is a simple little book as far as plot goes - there isn't much as far as racing action and cliffhangers - but the writing is fluid, the main characters are well-developed, and it really gives you a good feeling for life in a longhouse village. My 13yo daughter loved the traditional stories that were sprinkled throughout. This is a simple little book as far as plot goes - there isn't much as far as racing action and cliffhangers - but the writing is fluid, the main characters are well-developed, and it really gives you a good feeling for life in a longhouse village. My 13yo daughter loved the traditional stories that were sprinkled throughout.

  22. 5 out of 5

    C. Janelle

    Read with my son for the Build Your Library Level 5 American History curriculum. Enjoyable middle-grade novel that gives young readers a sense of kinship with people from another time and (in our case at least), culture. My son enjoyed connecting what we were reading in our nonfiction books with the fictional portrayal here.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Sheetz

    Joseph Bruchac tells the story of Mohawk twin boys in the late 1400s before Christopher Columbus. Glimpses into Mohawk life. Could be used in the study of Native Americans as well as a lead in to discussion on Christopher Columbus and how his arrival changed life for so many people. Classroom library for 4th through 6th grade.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    My kids (middle grades) and I enjoyed this story, historical fiction about a Native American boy in about the 1400's. We read as part of the Build Your Library Level 5 American History homeschool curriculum and enjoyed connecting what we were reading in our nonfiction books with the fictional story here. My kids (middle grades) and I enjoyed this story, historical fiction about a Native American boy in about the 1400's. We read as part of the Build Your Library Level 5 American History homeschool curriculum and enjoyed connecting what we were reading in our nonfiction books with the fictional story here.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I read this because my nephews were reading it and loving it. As I read it, I remembered I had read it when I was young, too. It is short, so it only begins to scratch the surface of life in the pre-contact League of Nations (indigenous northeastern U.S.), but I liked what was in there. Some of the values, such as modesty and sharing, go by quickly but would be great for modern kids to absorb.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Margy

    This is a fabulous book! Any person who likes to play Lacrosse should read this—child or adult. Any person interested in Native American culture should also read this. Well written, easy to understand with good life lessons.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    My husband bought this book for our son, and he hasn't read it yet, but he will. The writing is good, and the descriptions of Mohawk life are well-woven into the narrative. I love the map at the beginning, showing the Haudenosaunee territories in present-day New York State. My husband bought this book for our son, and he hasn't read it yet, but he will. The writing is good, and the descriptions of Mohawk life are well-woven into the narrative. I love the map at the beginning, showing the Haudenosaunee territories in present-day New York State.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jennybeast

    A fascinating setting -- Mohawk village in 1491, and a Native voice telling the stories -- it's a great book for anyone interested in imaging the past. Laced with stories, featuring a traditional healing Lacrosse game, and full of interesting day-to-day life. A fascinating setting -- Mohawk village in 1491, and a Native voice telling the stories -- it's a great book for anyone interested in imaging the past. Laced with stories, featuring a traditional healing Lacrosse game, and full of interesting day-to-day life.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elsa

    Bruchac's coming of age novel is a fascinating glimpse into Iroquois culture. I read this aloud to my 8 year old, and we both enjoyed reading about events leading up to and culminating in the main character Ohkwa'ri's participation in a large lacrosse game. Bruchac's coming of age novel is a fascinating glimpse into Iroquois culture. I read this aloud to my 8 year old, and we both enjoyed reading about events leading up to and culminating in the main character Ohkwa'ri's participation in a large lacrosse game.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Meghan Patterson

    Not a ton of action, but some really good life lessons to be explored. I don’t think my middle school students would read this independently but as a read-aloud with engaging activities planned it will work well.

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