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Resplendent

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Resplendent: Destiny's Children Book Four "Cadre Siblings" (2000) "Conurbation 2473" (2003) "Reality Dust" (2000) "Mayflower II" (2004)[b] "All in a Blaze" (2003) "Silver Ghost" (2000) "The Cold Sink" (2001) "On the Orion Line" (2000) "Ghost Wars" (2006) "The Ghost Pit" (2001) "Lakes of Light" (2005) "Breeding Ground" (2003) "The Dreaming Mould" (2002) "The Great Game" (20 Resplendent: Destiny's Children Book Four "Cadre Siblings" (2000) "Conurbation 2473" (2003) "Reality Dust" (2000) "Mayflower II" (2004)[b] "All in a Blaze" (2003) "Silver Ghost" (2000) "The Cold Sink" (2001) "On the Orion Line" (2000) "Ghost Wars" (2006) "The Ghost Pit" (2001) "Lakes of Light" (2005) "Breeding Ground" (2003) "The Dreaming Mould" (2002) "The Great Game" (2003) "The Chop Line" (2003) "In the Un-Black" (2001) "Riding the Rock" (2002) "Between Worlds" (2004) "The Siege of Earth" (2006)


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Resplendent: Destiny's Children Book Four "Cadre Siblings" (2000) "Conurbation 2473" (2003) "Reality Dust" (2000) "Mayflower II" (2004)[b] "All in a Blaze" (2003) "Silver Ghost" (2000) "The Cold Sink" (2001) "On the Orion Line" (2000) "Ghost Wars" (2006) "The Ghost Pit" (2001) "Lakes of Light" (2005) "Breeding Ground" (2003) "The Dreaming Mould" (2002) "The Great Game" (20 Resplendent: Destiny's Children Book Four "Cadre Siblings" (2000) "Conurbation 2473" (2003) "Reality Dust" (2000) "Mayflower II" (2004)[b] "All in a Blaze" (2003) "Silver Ghost" (2000) "The Cold Sink" (2001) "On the Orion Line" (2000) "Ghost Wars" (2006) "The Ghost Pit" (2001) "Lakes of Light" (2005) "Breeding Ground" (2003) "The Dreaming Mould" (2002) "The Great Game" (2003) "The Chop Line" (2003) "In the Un-Black" (2001) "Riding the Rock" (2002) "Between Worlds" (2004) "The Siege of Earth" (2006)

30 review for Resplendent

  1. 4 out of 5

    Clouds

    This is a very unusual and ambitious book. It forms part of the Destiny's Children series, which is itself part of the larger Xeelee Sequence... yet it is very much a unique and wonderful beast. It's a short story collection, set in the Destiny's Children universe and joining the dots between the other novels (and beyond). Because it's part of such a large, carefully developed universe each short story has powerful echoes of depth and atmosphere behind them - and because the stories form a long ch This is a very unusual and ambitious book. It forms part of the Destiny's Children series, which is itself part of the larger Xeelee Sequence... yet it is very much a unique and wonderful beast. It's a short story collection, set in the Destiny's Children universe and joining the dots between the other novels (and beyond). Because it's part of such a large, carefully developed universe each short story has powerful echoes of depth and atmosphere behind them - and because the stories form a long chain across the centuries, they have this cohesive message and momentum that is intoxicating. It doesn't feel at all like reading a collection of unrelated short-stories. There's a Kim Stanley Robinson book, The Years of Rice and Salt , about a group of souls that live, die and then reincarnate in different constellations. Through their many lives they chart the evolution of an alternative Earth, one where Europe was wiped out by the black plague. That book is BRILLIANT. Resplendant doesn't quite hit those heights - but there's a lot of similarities in the way Baxter weaves a single thread through many different lives down a time-line. For me, what sets The Years of Rice and Salt above Resplendant is the vision of humanity - Robinson presents individuals who dance and love and create and dream... Baxter presents cogs in the great war machine of humanity as it grinds across the galaxy. For all it's wonder and ambition, this is a bleak assessment of humanities potential. But I can LOVE bleak books - Willis' Doomsday Book broke my heart, but I loved it. I never loved this. I respect it enormously. It grew on me throughout as I found new aspects of it's innovative design and execution to appreciate. It's austere, and brilliantly balanced. But it's not terribly fun. The light-hearted and playful moments are few and far between. There's a very old-school vibe about all of Baxter's work. Some essential quality reminiscent of sci-fi written by thinkers who are scientists and engineers first, and become writers second. Fans of Arthur C Clarke and Asimov may gel well with Baxter. For fans of intelligent, serious, fascinating sci-fi - Resplendant is HIGHLY recommend. And despite being part of a bigger series, it would stand-alone perfectly well. Considering the low number of reviews/ratings it has on Goodreads, this is also clearly a bit of an under-appreciated gem! After this I read: Mona Lisa Overdrive

  2. 5 out of 5

    Riju Ganguly

    Blame it on Asimov. Ever since he had unleashed the “Foundation” saga, with its maddeningly realistic-yet-improbable glimpses of future where mankind shapes the fate of the universe through ups & downs, every writer ‘doing’ sci-fi has felt like having one of his/her own epics in that vein, comprising doorstopper novels and intimidatingly long novellas. As it happens, readers have thrown away most of the garbage, and all that we are left with are hard & compact stories. Stephen Baxter has tried ( Blame it on Asimov. Ever since he had unleashed the “Foundation” saga, with its maddeningly realistic-yet-improbable glimpses of future where mankind shapes the fate of the universe through ups & downs, every writer ‘doing’ sci-fi has felt like having one of his/her own epics in that vein, comprising doorstopper novels and intimidatingly long novellas. As it happens, readers have thrown away most of the garbage, and all that we are left with are hard & compact stories. Stephen Baxter has tried (with considerable success) to tell several epical stories concerning the fate of mankind, separately. One such arc is commonly known as the ‘Xeelee Sequence’, and this book contains several stories & novellas (all of them are stand-alone) depicting various points & stages in that particular ark. Trying to summarise the stories would essentially give away vital plot-points of the sequence, and readers who are yet to encounter that sequence in the form of the novels might find such a summary as utterly ‘killjoy’. Hence, I would refrain from that, and would confine myself to offering the following observations: 1. This is mostly a bleak book. When you keep in mind the time-frame of the chronologically arranged stories (1st story AD 5301, 19th /final story AD 10,00,000), you are bound to feel depressed because, from our perspective, even a decade seems to be inordinately long. Also, the modifications that humanity undergoes during this time-span are not just physical (unlike other space-opera or ‘hard’ SF), but mostly emotional, and that is not very inspiring. 2. While wars and wanton savagery (both resulting not just from tactical quest for resources, but primarily due to intolerance & suspicion towards anyone or anything ‘different’) have already started ravaging our planet, to read about a future where mankind becomes less ‘humane’ than aliens and carries out such savagery on a universal scale to ensure that the species becomes a monolithic parasite intent on exploiting everything indefinitely, is positively depressing. Precisely for these reasons, the two stories that have stuck in my mind, and to which I might return in future, are ‘Mayflower II’ (dealing with a stage where mankind has become triumphant and has started exploring again, for the sake of discovery) and ‘The Siege of Earth’ (mankind loses everything, but childhood & innocence remain there, perhaps awaiting freedom from virtual space). Now, it’s your call.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I've just read my way through the entirety of the Destiny's Children series and I feel pretty depressed about our future as a species. I've read the books previously, and I don't think my take away from them was the same, although I don't exactly remember, hence the re-read. The book itself is well written, but suffers too much from repetition of themes; the many short stories in the book continually cover the primary theme of humanity-at-war, which given that the focus of these novels is squarel I've just read my way through the entirety of the Destiny's Children series and I feel pretty depressed about our future as a species. I've read the books previously, and I don't think my take away from them was the same, although I don't exactly remember, hence the re-read. The book itself is well written, but suffers too much from repetition of themes; the many short stories in the book continually cover the primary theme of humanity-at-war, which given that the focus of these novels is squarely humanity's ascension and eventual fall to the Xeelee, shouldn't come as too much of a surprise. With that said however, I do feel that the repetition of humanity's focus on repressing individual expression and focus on glory via death to be a tad depressing. In some of the other Xeelee sequence novels, I've felt that there was a universe being created complete with enough room for individual adventures, within which the Qax occupation and overthrow was but a single thread. These novels are about nothing but war, focused around the overthrow of the Qax, the stasis that the Coalition holds mankind within, and the misery that's endemic when we suppress our empathy for one another. There were some good stories though, so it wasn't all doom and gloom, but since most stories use either a war as a backdrop or as a jumping off point to start a story, and since they are short stories, there isn't always room for exploring intriguing plot points or novel ideas in the same way there might be with a longer format story. Overall, I'm glad I re-read the four books - they've given me a refresh on the Xeelee sequence, penned in a lot of detail on the origins of that universe, and laid bare a number of things that were left unexplored in the primary material. That said, I think I might read something a little more light hearted to take my mind off the next million years of humanity!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Max

    The fourth in the Destiny's Children series, this collection of short stories follows the fate of mankind through a history of its intergalactic politics, wars and philosophies, or rather "religions". Baxter's universe is not a pleasant one and war seems to be the driving force for economic, political and territorial expansion. Interestingly, many of the main characters in these short stories are young people finding out what it means to be a member of a galaxy-conquering race, finding man's des The fourth in the Destiny's Children series, this collection of short stories follows the fate of mankind through a history of its intergalactic politics, wars and philosophies, or rather "religions". Baxter's universe is not a pleasant one and war seems to be the driving force for economic, political and territorial expansion. Interestingly, many of the main characters in these short stories are young people finding out what it means to be a member of a galaxy-conquering race, finding man's destiny. Interesting hard sf.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andy Mac

    I enjoyed this book. A collection of short stories that spans much of the universe Baxter has developed (in time and in location). I like this way of interacting with a known universe, and could have read dozens more of these stories. I can't say that the "ending" was satisfactory, though. An unfortunate side effect of this style, perhaps. Even so, this book almost stands alone and was a fun read. I enjoyed this book. A collection of short stories that spans much of the universe Baxter has developed (in time and in location). I like this way of interacting with a known universe, and could have read dozens more of these stories. I can't say that the "ending" was satisfactory, though. An unfortunate side effect of this style, perhaps. Even so, this book almost stands alone and was a fun read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stuart Smith

    Some good, some dull. Not as consistent as other collection of short stories. 'Vacuum Diagrams' was much better. But some interesting and far out concepts nonetheless. Some good, some dull. Not as consistent as other collection of short stories. 'Vacuum Diagrams' was much better. But some interesting and far out concepts nonetheless.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shane Kiely

    A short story collection that knits together the various events of the various chapters of the Destiny's Children universe (though being primarily being set in the far future the contemporary/ancient world set Coalescent doesn't get much of a lookin). Like most of these types of books the quality can vary here & there, though there isn't a story I can highlight as being a particular dud. Mayflower 2, is probably my favourite story of the bunch, it feels the most unique (a lot of the others are g A short story collection that knits together the various events of the various chapters of the Destiny's Children universe (though being primarily being set in the far future the contemporary/ancient world set Coalescent doesn't get much of a lookin). Like most of these types of books the quality can vary here & there, though there isn't a story I can highlight as being a particular dud. Mayflower 2, is probably my favourite story of the bunch, it feels the most unique (a lot of the others are grouped together because they correspond to a theme & they blur a little) it explores interesting concepts about how human society transforms over the course of millennia long space flight. I personally found the last story a little anti climactic but as a whole it's a strong collection. Something for the reader that like their sci fi a bit out there but accessible.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Martin Huijgen

    It's a collection of short but consecutive stories that describe events in Baxter's universe he layed out in the previous three Destiny's Childrens books. I'm not usually a fan of short stories but this is really reads like one story, just running different characters most of the time. Not messy or complicated, it actually helps understand the previous volumes. It's a collection of short but consecutive stories that describe events in Baxter's universe he layed out in the previous three Destiny's Childrens books. I'm not usually a fan of short stories but this is really reads like one story, just running different characters most of the time. Not messy or complicated, it actually helps understand the previous volumes.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    A massive saga covering the whole of human history plus a few thousand years into the future comes to an end. I thought it was a bit long, a bit dull in places and not as good as the others and seemed to crawl along then suddenly finish in a sprint, but a somewhat jerky bitty finish and not altogether satisfying.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Aqiul Colombowala

    Fantastic! The scale of the universe imagined by Baxter is astounding! This is a great book, filling the gaps in the massive Xeelee series.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mark Catalfano

    I liked "Ghost Wars", "Breeding Ground" and "Between Worlds" I liked "Ghost Wars", "Breeding Ground" and "Between Worlds"

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jcledezma

    Nah. Could only get through 2 chapters. Too convolutred.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Efehan Elbi

    A breathtaking scope of future history. Longer review to come. Hard to imagine what to read next to follow this series of stories that think conceptually in passing millenia.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Johannes Remillard

  15. 4 out of 5

    KRZYSZTOF WOSIK

  16. 4 out of 5

    Philippe Lior-liechtenstein

  17. 5 out of 5

    Besada

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeroen De Wijn

  19. 4 out of 5

    Don Wiley

  20. 5 out of 5

    KCreader

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  22. 4 out of 5

    Severn2j

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  24. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Buckleton

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mr. Fuckin

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jake Friedenberg

  29. 5 out of 5

    Witek

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mr S

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