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Children Just Like Me

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Tadesse from Ethiopia, Suchart from Thailand, Celina from Brazil. . . each of these children has hopes and fears, dreams and beliefs. Their cultures are different, yet in many ways their daily lives are very similar, as are their hopes for the future and their ways of looking at the world. Over the past two years, a photographer and a teacher have traveled to more than 30 c Tadesse from Ethiopia, Suchart from Thailand, Celina from Brazil. . . each of these children has hopes and fears, dreams and beliefs. Their cultures are different, yet in many ways their daily lives are very similar, as are their hopes for the future and their ways of looking at the world. Over the past two years, a photographer and a teacher have traveled to more than 30 countries, meeting and interviewing children. Each child's story is recorded in this remarkable book, published to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Extraordinary photographs bring to life the children's families and homes, their clothes and food, their friends and favorite games, and other aspects of their daily lives. The children live in places as diverse as New York, Mongolia, and the Amazon Basin. These are children from both industrialized and developing nations, children from busy cities and remote rural communities, and children from tribal cultures. Their environments include mountains, deserts, rain forests, plains, and polar regions. Most live in families, but Suchart, a novice monk, lives in a monastery, and Tadesse, an Ethiopian boy, lives in an orphanage. Children everywhere will enjoy reading about the lives of these children who share their world. Those who want to make friends with children around the world can join the Children Just Like Me Penpal Club, details of which are included in this book. Part of the Penpal Club membership fee goes to support UNICEF, helping children all over the world.


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Tadesse from Ethiopia, Suchart from Thailand, Celina from Brazil. . . each of these children has hopes and fears, dreams and beliefs. Their cultures are different, yet in many ways their daily lives are very similar, as are their hopes for the future and their ways of looking at the world. Over the past two years, a photographer and a teacher have traveled to more than 30 c Tadesse from Ethiopia, Suchart from Thailand, Celina from Brazil. . . each of these children has hopes and fears, dreams and beliefs. Their cultures are different, yet in many ways their daily lives are very similar, as are their hopes for the future and their ways of looking at the world. Over the past two years, a photographer and a teacher have traveled to more than 30 countries, meeting and interviewing children. Each child's story is recorded in this remarkable book, published to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Extraordinary photographs bring to life the children's families and homes, their clothes and food, their friends and favorite games, and other aspects of their daily lives. The children live in places as diverse as New York, Mongolia, and the Amazon Basin. These are children from both industrialized and developing nations, children from busy cities and remote rural communities, and children from tribal cultures. Their environments include mountains, deserts, rain forests, plains, and polar regions. Most live in families, but Suchart, a novice monk, lives in a monastery, and Tadesse, an Ethiopian boy, lives in an orphanage. Children everywhere will enjoy reading about the lives of these children who share their world. Those who want to make friends with children around the world can join the Children Just Like Me Penpal Club, details of which are included in this book. Part of the Penpal Club membership fee goes to support UNICEF, helping children all over the world.

30 review for Children Just Like Me

  1. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    I remember looking through it several times when Georgia my daughter was five or six and I just had to stop and walk away. All these beautiful children, and all their little hopes and fragile families. Each child describes themselves like this - "Hello. My name is Joseph Mbangwe and I live in a village in Eastern Congo and I am eight years old. I have two little brothers and a baby little sister. I do not go to school yet, but wish to do so soon, when it is possible. I love football!" And you t I remember looking through it several times when Georgia my daughter was five or six and I just had to stop and walk away. All these beautiful children, and all their little hopes and fragile families. Each child describes themselves like this - "Hello. My name is Joseph Mbangwe and I live in a village in Eastern Congo and I am eight years old. I have two little brothers and a baby little sister. I do not go to school yet, but wish to do so soon, when it is possible. I love football!" And you the adult reading this book several years after it was published are silently adding some other comments : "I do not wish to be kidnapped and made to fight by some other boys. I do not wish a lot of soldiers shooting people in my village. I do not hope to have killed ten other boys by the time I am fourteen. I wish to go to school." Or then there was a lovely Eastern European girl. "Hello everyone. My name is Nadia and I live in a small town in the middle of Romania. My dream is to be a dancer and maybe to go to America. I practise every day. I am ten years old" to which can be added "..... and I do not wish when I am eighteen to be told that there is a great job waiting for me in London and to give some guy 20,000 lei to get me there and to wake up and find the job isn't like he said it was at all..." Anyway, you get the drift. The effect of all those little faces, the earnest ones, the crazy smiling ones, the wistful ones, the fiery ones - and sitting next to me my own little earnest daughter asking - "do you thing she will grow up to be a dancer?" - it was way too much for me. There were pages and pages of these kids, and I knew that some of them would be all right, and some of them wouldn't. There should be a sticker on the front : "Warning! Not for Grownups! Pages of happy hopeful smiling children inside!"

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tisha

    I got this book as a gift from an amazing English lady nearly 13 or 14 years ago and at that time I had no idea that I would get so attached to this book! I used to spend hours looking at those pictures and reading the notes around them. It felt like being surrounded by friends, friends from different regions, different cultures. I still open the book often just to see those familiar faces. Yeah, I haven't met them in real life, but they gifted me some beautiful memories that will definitely sta I got this book as a gift from an amazing English lady nearly 13 or 14 years ago and at that time I had no idea that I would get so attached to this book! I used to spend hours looking at those pictures and reading the notes around them. It felt like being surrounded by friends, friends from different regions, different cultures. I still open the book often just to see those familiar faces. Yeah, I haven't met them in real life, but they gifted me some beautiful memories that will definitely stay in my heart forever! Can't explain in words how much I love this book! :')

  3. 5 out of 5

    A

    Clear color photographs of children from around the world as well as their houses, schools, favorite foods, and activities Ages 4-9 One of the best resources for introducing children to different cultures around the globe, this book was written by Anabel and Barnabas Kindersley in association with UNICEF. Each one or two page spread shows a closeup picture of a real child, and clear photographs illustrate his or her family, house, favorite foods and what they like to play with. My child immediatel Clear color photographs of children from around the world as well as their houses, schools, favorite foods, and activities Ages 4-9 One of the best resources for introducing children to different cultures around the globe, this book was written by Anabel and Barnabas Kindersley in association with UNICEF. Each one or two page spread shows a closeup picture of a real child, and clear photographs illustrate his or her family, house, favorite foods and what they like to play with. My child immediately loved Celina, a Tembe Indian from Brazil who wears no shirt , but her chest is decorated with red paint, and she sleeps in a hammock and bathes in a river. Other children portrayed are Rachel, who lives in a French chateau, Meena, who lives on a construction site in India, and Suchart, a Thai monk. The book encourages children to see children in other parts of the world, no matter how humble their possessions, as beautiful and important individuals. The only possible danger from reading this book is that, because there is only one child from most countries, some children might assume that all Brazilians look like Celina. Aside from that possibility, however, I think this book excites curiosity and appreciation of the world's diverse cultures. The ALA voted this book a Notable/Best book of 1996. A Horn Book review from March, 1996 mentions helpfully that the magazine-like format of the book encourages browsing and will provide children with insight about other cultures. A School Library Journal review from January, 1996 goes into more detail about how the book is organized, i.e. that it is divided by continent and contains a supplemental section in the form of a travel diary by the authors. Both reviews summarize what the book contains and agree that the book would be enlightening for children to read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kelly H. (Maybedog)

    Really inclusive and beautiful. Most of the kids are wearing common clothes in their countries, not traditional garb. (I usually hate that because then they just put American children in street clothes implying that they kids in Japan wear kimonos.) The illustrations are big and the information in small paragraphs around the illustrations, making it much less daunting and allowing someone to rid bits of a page and still get a cohesive bit of information. I think this is an wonderful gift for kid Really inclusive and beautiful. Most of the kids are wearing common clothes in their countries, not traditional garb. (I usually hate that because then they just put American children in street clothes implying that they kids in Japan wear kimonos.) The illustrations are big and the information in small paragraphs around the illustrations, making it much less daunting and allowing someone to rid bits of a page and still get a cohesive bit of information. I think this is an wonderful gift for kids and is suitable for reading with a child.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    Ah, this is a UNICEF book, which I didn’t know until I had it in hand. I’ve always liked UNICEF; every year I trick or treated for them when I was young, and as I recall, quite a bit of my own savings got contributed as well. This is a wonderful book highlighting various children from around the world. Each child is profiled and interesting aspects of their lives are shown: their families, friends, favorite foods, customs, religion, dress, toys, what they call their mother and father, schooling, Ah, this is a UNICEF book, which I didn’t know until I had it in hand. I’ve always liked UNICEF; every year I trick or treated for them when I was young, and as I recall, quite a bit of my own savings got contributed as well. This is a wonderful book highlighting various children from around the world. Each child is profiled and interesting aspects of their lives are shown: their families, friends, favorite foods, customs, religion, dress, toys, what they call their mother and father, schooling, how they write their name in their language, certain other details of their lifestyles, and so much more. There are a lot of photos included. The featured children range in age from six to twelve, but siblings and child relatives both younger and older than in this range are shown too. The book is structured by continent, then by country and by individual child. At the beginning of each continent section, there are photos and information about the area. As with all books like this I wanted even more details, more children, more countries, but it was more comprehensive than I’d expected. At the end, the authors/creators talk a little about their journey through the various countries and recall certain details about what happened with individual children, and I found that interesting. I was very uplifted to see so many of these children talk about their concerns about the environment, war, education, and other important world concerns. In the end, children are children/people are people everywhere, a not unexpected message to take away from a UNICEF book. I was very touched by many of these children’s lives and stories. Now, I want to read Children Just Like Me: Celebrations! It’s a similar book by the same team. Ha! I started to put this book on my bookshelves instead of putting it on the pile of books that needs to go back to the library. Perhaps that does show I’d like to own this book, in part to share it with children. This is a great book for children and also a terrific book to share with children, including those too young to read the text for themselves.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jackie "the Librarian"

    Great photos showing kids' daily lives around the world. Schools, food, and homes are all shown, and the contrasts are fascinating, while still showing that kids are kids, no matter where they live. Highly recommended for everyone! Great photos showing kids' daily lives around the world. Schools, food, and homes are all shown, and the contrasts are fascinating, while still showing that kids are kids, no matter where they live. Highly recommended for everyone!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    A very good book for children to learn about other cultures and to broaden their minds about other races, languages and traditions.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Eli Claire

    One of my absolute favorite books as a kid!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alondra Carter

    I really love how the book introduces children to different cultures. It is really nice how each page shows kids from different countries, with facts about their culture and country. I also love how the children are wearing traditional wear from their culture. I believe the book is a good way to introduce children to different cultures, countries, and overall diversity the world has to offer. I believe this is a good book for kids of all ages.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Allie

    I looooooooved this book when I was a kid. I think my grandmother bought it for me, but my copy got lost over the course of 20 years. But just today I found a copy at the book seller for 25 cents! Bingo! There's something really cool about seeing how kids your age live all around the world. Specifically I loved seeing how they all wrote their names and pictures of the little things they treasured. I remember thinking a lot about their schools and the kinds of things they ate. The book profiles a I looooooooved this book when I was a kid. I think my grandmother bought it for me, but my copy got lost over the course of 20 years. But just today I found a copy at the book seller for 25 cents! Bingo! There's something really cool about seeing how kids your age live all around the world. Specifically I loved seeing how they all wrote their names and pictures of the little things they treasured. I remember thinking a lot about their schools and the kinds of things they ate. The book profiles a handful of kids per continent, but each section starts with photos of lots of kids with an introduction to the region. I remember reading and wanting so much more. I wanted to read profiles on every single one of those kids! Especially if the girls had cool barrettes or a fancy dress. It was really powerful to get a small dose of global perspective, in a way that is applicable and understandable to children.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

    Beautiful book, children from around the world, pictures of their family, their house, their favourite toy and what they eat for tea. Such a compelling read, how amazing ( or not ) that the child that lives in tent with next to no possessions looks as eqally as happy as the western child in the city. I think what all these children have in common are loving parents.

  12. 5 out of 5

    G Beulah

    This book introduces children to other cultures in an approachable way (the profiles are only a page long), the profiles detail children’s lives in other countries. Each profile contains information about the food they eat, activities they do, the other people in their family and other details about the lives of children in other places. I can see this book being very useful in school in PSHE, spotting similarities and differences between the children in the book’s lives and cultures and those of This book introduces children to other cultures in an approachable way (the profiles are only a page long), the profiles detail children’s lives in other countries. Each profile contains information about the food they eat, activities they do, the other people in their family and other details about the lives of children in other places. I can see this book being very useful in school in PSHE, spotting similarities and differences between the children in the book’s lives and cultures and those of children in the class, and in topic work about particular countries, cultures or celebrations. The profiles are written in a purely factual way, with only a single quote from each child, which allows children to use their imaginations, and the accompanying pictures, to flesh out the profiles. I loved this book as a child and enjoyed reading about the routines of other children. I think it would be interesting to introduce the book and use the style of the profiles as a “getting to know you” activity, asking children to make their own or make one for another child in the class.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Finally I found it with Google’s help! I’ve been racking my brain trying to remember the title of a book I loved reading & looking at when I was younger. The names of the kids, how they each wrote their name (using their native alphabet but a translation was included) & the clothing of each child always intrigued me. I remember being fascinated the 1st time I read about the girl from Russia—Olga pictured with her sister Dasha I believe—because their alphabet was so much different. I remember thi Finally I found it with Google’s help! I’ve been racking my brain trying to remember the title of a book I loved reading & looking at when I was younger. The names of the kids, how they each wrote their name (using their native alphabet but a translation was included) & the clothing of each child always intrigued me. I remember being fascinated the 1st time I read about the girl from Russia—Olga pictured with her sister Dasha I believe—because their alphabet was so much different. I remember thinking the clothing the twin boys from Japan (or another country nearby) wore were so cool. The colors were so vibrant & reminded me of clothes I saw in movies like Aladdin or the King & I. For anyone who is a teacher, is a parent of a Girl Scout or Boy Scout, or any parents in general I suggest getting this book for your kids. There’s so much about each child’s life on their page or pages. Usually 1 or 2 pages are devoted to each child or siblings in a few cases

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paul Rondema

    Children Just Like Me provides a snapshot of the lives lived by children throughout the world, their families and schools and food and games and friends. When my daughter was between the ages of 4 and 7 she asked me to read this book (almost) nightly. It sparked conversations about the similarities between her and the kids as well as differences. We got to talk about places we want to visit and people we would like to meet. Most of all, Children Just Like Me exposed my daughter to the facts that Children Just Like Me provides a snapshot of the lives lived by children throughout the world, their families and schools and food and games and friends. When my daughter was between the ages of 4 and 7 she asked me to read this book (almost) nightly. It sparked conversations about the similarities between her and the kids as well as differences. We got to talk about places we want to visit and people we would like to meet. Most of all, Children Just Like Me exposed my daughter to the facts that there are countless different ways people live their lives, but all kids (and all people) share common hopes and joys. Plus, I learned a lot by reading it (over and over again). I recommend Children Just Like Me for kids ages 4 to 7. For more recommendations please visit https://paulrondemachildrensauthor.wo....

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell

    Informative and interesting. But also a lot longer than it looks. And in the end finishing this was tedious and boring. Looking at this book repeatedly, just browsing through would probably be a lot better. The making of this book brings up so many questions of the choices the writers made. Where to go, who to show, what to ask. I wonder that it doesn't leave a lot more of the writers than they would have wanted. Informative and interesting. But also a lot longer than it looks. And in the end finishing this was tedious and boring. Looking at this book repeatedly, just browsing through would probably be a lot better. The making of this book brings up so many questions of the choices the writers made. Where to go, who to show, what to ask. I wonder that it doesn't leave a lot more of the writers than they would have wanted.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    This is a wonderful book highlighting various children from around the world. Each child is profiled and interesting aspects of their lives are shown: their families, friends, favorite foods, customs, religion, dress, toys, what they call their mother and father, schooling, how they write their name in their language, certain other details of their lifestyles, and so much more.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hanna

    One of my favourite books from my childhood. I remember being so excited reading about other children around the world and how they live. I re-read it as my first book of 2017 and it's still as good. Every child should read this. One of my favourite books from my childhood. I remember being so excited reading about other children around the world and how they live. I re-read it as my first book of 2017 and it's still as good. Every child should read this.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Faith Hough

    My kids loved this, but it needs to be updated. :) Very 90's feel to it...certainly the U.S. children pictured today would look very different, so I wonder what inaccuracies there are about countries I know less about. My kids loved this, but it needs to be updated. :) Very 90's feel to it...certainly the U.S. children pictured today would look very different, so I wonder what inaccuracies there are about countries I know less about.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Miriam Shaw

    This book covers children all over the world and their daily life (clothes, beliefs, likes, family, home life, food, etc). It will show different poverty levels and struggles people face all over the world.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    This inspiring nonfiction text takes readers on a trip around the globe to meet children of all ages and learn more about their unique lifestyles. Written by Anabel and Barnabas Kindersley in conjunction with UNICEF, Children Just Like Me introduces readers to children from around the world, presenting how they live in relation to their diverse cultures and environments. Centered on one or two pages are clear, colorful photographs of a child as well as pictures of their family and friends, favor This inspiring nonfiction text takes readers on a trip around the globe to meet children of all ages and learn more about their unique lifestyles. Written by Anabel and Barnabas Kindersley in conjunction with UNICEF, Children Just Like Me introduces readers to children from around the world, presenting how they live in relation to their diverse cultures and environments. Centered on one or two pages are clear, colorful photographs of a child as well as pictures of their family and friends, favorite foods, houses, schools and activities. In addition, the child presented on each page is interviewed, allowing readers an opportunity to learn more about their hopes, dreams, likes, dislikes and favorite traditions. The text is accessible to both advanced and emergent readers as interview-format and short blocks of writing along with many illustrations allow individuals to make their own meaning and understanding of the child presented. Presented in a magazine-like format, this book can be read from cover to cover or by simply taking a look at one child at a time. Its accessibility will encourage readers to identify with children from around the world, reflecting on their own way of life to those living in different parts of the globe. In the elementary classroom, this book could be effectively utilized during a study of culture, tradition and way of life. In addition, a study of countries around the world could be used in conjunction with this text as students make the connection of how one lives is directly related to where they live. For instance, Celina, a Tembe Indian from Brazil presented in the text, and bathes in a river outside of her home each day; the river stands as a source of agriculture, food and transportation for her and her family. Allowing students an opportunity to make these connections is vital as they begin to develop an understanding of people around the globe, from all cultures, socio-economic backgrounds and traditions. This engaging text encourages readers to see children different from themselves as unique and valued individuals no matter how vast or small their differences might be.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jack Kirby and the X-man

    This book allows children to obtain insight into the lives of kids around the world. 35 kids from around the world have 1 or 2 pages devoted to them. Common themes run through each profile - a large picture of the child wearing typical clothing, a quick introduction to the child's family and living arrangements, how the child signs their name, what they eat, what school is like, etc. Each page is covered with plenty of photos. One criticism I have is skewed selection of kids. Of the 35 kids repre This book allows children to obtain insight into the lives of kids around the world. 35 kids from around the world have 1 or 2 pages devoted to them. Common themes run through each profile - a large picture of the child wearing typical clothing, a quick introduction to the child's family and living arrangements, how the child signs their name, what they eat, what school is like, etc. Each page is covered with plenty of photos. One criticism I have is skewed selection of kids. Of the 35 kids representing the whole world - 5 are from the US. The authors tried hard to select a variety of different US citizens (an Acoma Indian from New Mexico, a suburbanite from LA, a city-dweller from New York, a small town resident from Illinois, and a Yu'pik Eskimo from Alaska), but nevertheless I think that 4 of these could easily have been used to profile kids from 4 additional countries. These 4 could have represented a Pacific Island (maybe Vanuatu, Fiji or Samoa), South-West Asia (Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, or Tajikistan), Central Africa (eg Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, etc) and Central America (Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, etc). But really this is a pretty minor criticism in what is a fantastic book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Zoe Lampman

    Children Just Like Me by Barnabas Kindersley was one of my favorite books when I was a young child. I had forgotten about it until I had to look for multicultural literature for class. It is a large non-fiction book and each page is about a child from a different part of the world. There are pictures of the children, their families, their homes, their favorite food, and their favorite pastimes. The children discuss family life, what their parents do, what they learn in school, and what they do f Children Just Like Me by Barnabas Kindersley was one of my favorite books when I was a young child. I had forgotten about it until I had to look for multicultural literature for class. It is a large non-fiction book and each page is about a child from a different part of the world. There are pictures of the children, their families, their homes, their favorite food, and their favorite pastimes. The children discuss family life, what their parents do, what they learn in school, and what they do for fun. The children's names are handwritten in their language as well. I would love to have this book in my classroom for children to read independently. If we were learning about a new place or culture I would take the book out and read about the child from the discussed location. It is written to help children understand that there are children all around the world that may be far away and look different but have the same interests. Students will learn about many new cultures. The book would be best for students in first through fourth grades, but could be used for research for older students.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Erik Akre

    An incredibly well-fashioned book, this exposes children to others that live all around the world. Each double-page spread introduces us to a new child and a new place. There are great pictures (as with so many DK books) of the people, foods, houses, tools, toys, and environments of a large array of the world's diverse young people. Avoiding a cover-to-cover read (which would be far too exhausting anyway), the adult can look with children randomly through the book and get to know the book's subj An incredibly well-fashioned book, this exposes children to others that live all around the world. Each double-page spread introduces us to a new child and a new place. There are great pictures (as with so many DK books) of the people, foods, houses, tools, toys, and environments of a large array of the world's diverse young people. Avoiding a cover-to-cover read (which would be far too exhausting anyway), the adult can look with children randomly through the book and get to know the book's subjects in any order. I found that my children wanted to come back to certain "friends" multiple times, developing particular relationships. We pulled this book out to remind our adult daughter of it, and she still remembered the children with whom she felt a special bond. The book is remarkable for how vivid it is, and how sincerely it brings the reader into the lives of these international children. Any parent who wants their child exposed to different cultures will want this book; UNICEF and Kindersley had a great idea: to create this exposure by introducing children to other children. An important book to add to a child's library: a book of peace and friendship.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bojana Žakelj

    My parents bought me this book when I was in kindergarten. I swear I knew it by heart - all the names and everything. Among all the books I had, this one was just my favorite.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I loved this book as a kid. There are so many amazing photographs and lots of fun information about real children and their families all over the world. Every few pages focus on a child and their family from a country and what they eat, their traditions, what they wear, activities, where they go to school, what they do after school, etc. It is fun for kids to look through and relate what they do to other children internationally. It's also such a great resource to use while talking about differe I loved this book as a kid. There are so many amazing photographs and lots of fun information about real children and their families all over the world. Every few pages focus on a child and their family from a country and what they eat, their traditions, what they wear, activities, where they go to school, what they do after school, etc. It is fun for kids to look through and relate what they do to other children internationally. It's also such a great resource to use while talking about different cultures and accepting people's differences. I saw this in my classroom today and pulled it out to look at during snack time, and three students came over to look at it with me and were just fascinated. They told me about the food in the book that they also eat, and the things they do that the children in the book do as well. I will definitely be putting this in my classroom; I believe it is appropriate for every grade.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Longenbaugh

    This book is an informational book that highlights a different continent or country in the continent on each page, and is from the point of view of children. For example, there is a page where a girl from New Zealand is featured, and she shows what her life is like there, what kind of food she eats, and some of the history. This book cannot include a child from every single country, but many countries are chosen and talked about from a child's perspective. This book is interactive and engaging f This book is an informational book that highlights a different continent or country in the continent on each page, and is from the point of view of children. For example, there is a page where a girl from New Zealand is featured, and she shows what her life is like there, what kind of food she eats, and some of the history. This book cannot include a child from every single country, but many countries are chosen and talked about from a child's perspective. This book is interactive and engaging for children because there are many pictures and quotes about the country, it is not just written in an essay format. This book would best be used in a kindergarten or first grade classroom, when students are learning about themselves and about others. If there is not much diversity in the classroom, this book can be read over the course of a month or the year to show students that there are children in other countries who are similar to them.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Taressa Williams

    This book gives insight into the lives of children all over the world. There were no main characters in this book, but the book focus on a child from basically every country across the globe (ex. India, China,and New York). The author talks about the foods that people from this country may eat, family structure, and the child's home (ex. hunts, homes on stilts, and adobe homes). As a teacher, I would not use this text to teach because I could not find anything in a literary sense. I would use th This book gives insight into the lives of children all over the world. There were no main characters in this book, but the book focus on a child from basically every country across the globe (ex. India, China,and New York). The author talks about the foods that people from this country may eat, family structure, and the child's home (ex. hunts, homes on stilts, and adobe homes). As a teacher, I would not use this text to teach because I could not find anything in a literary sense. I would use this book to show my students that there are children across the world that live different lives from what they are use to seeing. The students will interact more with the text because the photos provide great detail on everyday life for someone different from them. Barnabas and Anabel Kindersley did a great job providing as much detail as that could about each child in the text.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

    I really enjoyed this book. I loved how the read is able to learn about the world through the lives of children. This book is perfect when teaching children in preschool and elementary school about culture. My favorite part of the book is reading the little paragraphs that the children wrote about themselves, their interests, how they felt about their home country etc. Through this book there is also many emergent activities that could be done to go the extra mile with children. This book not on I really enjoyed this book. I loved how the read is able to learn about the world through the lives of children. This book is perfect when teaching children in preschool and elementary school about culture. My favorite part of the book is reading the little paragraphs that the children wrote about themselves, their interests, how they felt about their home country etc. Through this book there is also many emergent activities that could be done to go the extra mile with children. This book not only shows children that there are other children from all different parts of the world that have a lot of the same interests as they do. I think that all children can relate to someone described in this book. This book also does a fabulous job of introducing possible new interests to children. I highly recommend this book especially for those who are going to work with children.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Anne

    I thought this book was very interesting! I'm always looking for ways to introduce different and varied cultures in the classroom and this certainly does the trick! I really appreciated how it talked about clothing, food, church, activities, and hobbies about each child from a different part of the world. UNICEF did a wonderful job with capturing and portraying the child's lifestyle from each part of the world. Children themselves can see the similarities and differences between each culture and I thought this book was very interesting! I'm always looking for ways to introduce different and varied cultures in the classroom and this certainly does the trick! I really appreciated how it talked about clothing, food, church, activities, and hobbies about each child from a different part of the world. UNICEF did a wonderful job with capturing and portraying the child's lifestyle from each part of the world. Children themselves can see the similarities and differences between each culture and country. A classroom idea that I came up with was to have my students make a venn-diagram with similarities and differences among 2 chosen countries. What a wonderful way to talk about and incorporate elements of geography, fashion, education, religion, activities, sports, and family!!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maren

    I got this one on a whim to expose my daughter to different cultures. Despite the fact that this book is probably intented for much older children, my 20-month-old loves looking at all the photos and I love bringing it as much to her level as I can by pointing out the different circumstances in which children live. Okay, maybe she didn't learn anything from me doing that, but it's a start, right? We checked this one out from the library, but I'd consider buying it and just having it as a great h I got this one on a whim to expose my daughter to different cultures. Despite the fact that this book is probably intented for much older children, my 20-month-old loves looking at all the photos and I love bringing it as much to her level as I can by pointing out the different circumstances in which children live. Okay, maybe she didn't learn anything from me doing that, but it's a start, right? We checked this one out from the library, but I'd consider buying it and just having it as a great home reference book. I think anybody, child or adult, would find this book interesting and educational.

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