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Upon reading Christianity In Crisis, some found it difficult to accept that anyone could make the bizarre statements cited. Here's an opportunity to hear the quotations live from the Faith teachers. Upon reading Christianity In Crisis, some found it difficult to accept that anyone could make the bizarre statements cited. Here's an opportunity to hear the quotations live from the Faith teachers.


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Upon reading Christianity In Crisis, some found it difficult to accept that anyone could make the bizarre statements cited. Here's an opportunity to hear the quotations live from the Faith teachers. Upon reading Christianity In Crisis, some found it difficult to accept that anyone could make the bizarre statements cited. Here's an opportunity to hear the quotations live from the Faith teachers.

30 review for Christianity in Crisis Audiobook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael Brown

    This is for the "Christianity In Crisis: The 21st Century" Edition ISBN: 978-0849900068 Good reads has a different book under that isbn.... "Even from your own number men will arise and distort the truth..." The Apostle Paul (Acts 20:30) I knew some of the theology of the "Word of Faith" movement but I never knew just how messed up and how full of error it actually is. After reading this book it is amazing and sad how many people are hooked by the personalities and the "Name it Claim it" and the " This is for the "Christianity In Crisis: The 21st Century" Edition ISBN: 978-0849900068 Good reads has a different book under that isbn.... "Even from your own number men will arise and distort the truth..." The Apostle Paul (Acts 20:30) I knew some of the theology of the "Word of Faith" movement but I never knew just how messed up and how full of error it actually is. After reading this book it is amazing and sad how many people are hooked by the personalities and the "Name it Claim it" and the "Jesus was rich and he wants you to be too. If you want a very well documented treaty on what some of the major players in the movement are and what they say or believe and how it stands up to an Historical and Evangelical view of the Bible. Or, if you are or have love ones who are in or listen to any of them -- This book is for you. It is amazing how far the "Word of Faith" movement moves from what the Bible clearly teaches. With this book you will learn about some the history of the "Word of Faith" movement. The Fathers of the movement and some of the current stars of it. You will also walk through some the major tentants of the movement.... and how it contrasts with the Bible and Historic Christianity.... 1. The reason of Faith and how it works in the spiritual economy. 2. Who is God? Are God's hands tied and does he need our permission to do anything on earth? What is Man? A Little God or not? Is Satan a God? And What about Christ? Did he take on the essence of Satan and go to hell? 3. What about Christ's atonement save us and what do they say about it? 4. The issue of wealth and the name it claim it "God wants you to be rich!" 5. The issue of sickness and suffering and then after that Hank takes us back to the basics... What is neccesary for a healthy Christian walk and how to spot a haresy from 100 yards away... and a basic primer on apologetics (The Study of the Defense of the Faith) My only issue with this book is that the same quotes seem to be used over and over and over again. After awhile it does start to wear on you. On the positive Hank and his crew set out to make a highly readable, understandable, highly documented (Over 50 pages of notes), and usable book about the differences between the "Word of Faith" movement and Historic - Evangelical Christianity (Including pentecostals). Overall, I would highly recommend this book to anyone.

  2. 4 out of 5

    J.E. Jr.

    I was delighted to read Christianity in Crisis: 21st Century Edition by Hank Hanegraaff. [Disclaimer: I was provided a free copy of this book by Thomas Nelson in exchange for my agreement to review it.] When I was in college, the first edition of this book came out. I was floored; I had always had a hunch that guys like Benny Hinn, Robert Schuler, and Kenneth Copeland were more snake-oil salesmen than they were Bible preachers, but I never knew how, to what extent, or just how dangerous they were I was delighted to read Christianity in Crisis: 21st Century Edition by Hank Hanegraaff. [Disclaimer: I was provided a free copy of this book by Thomas Nelson in exchange for my agreement to review it.] When I was in college, the first edition of this book came out. I was floored; I had always had a hunch that guys like Benny Hinn, Robert Schuler, and Kenneth Copeland were more snake-oil salesmen than they were Bible preachers, but I never knew how, to what extent, or just how dangerous they were. Kanegraaff picked their teachings apart astutely, always pointing out from direct quotes where the errors were, and always pointing the reader back to the true, biblical understanding of the same subject. Incidentally, a friend of mine had the audio-book version, and it was amazing: everywhere there were plain quotes in the printed text version, the audio-book provided an original audio clip of the heretic in question saying exactly what was quoted! Fast foward almost 20 years, and there are still lots of snake-oil salesmen around. Some of the same guys are peddling their lies, but a whole swath of new folks have emerged on the scene. Hanegraaff faithfully takes these guys on, too: Joel Osteen, Joyce Myer, Creflo Dollar, and others fall flat on their faces as Hank picks their teachings apart. Two things I really appreciate about this book: First, we're not talking about mere nit-picking or looking under every rock. Hanegraaff reveals the serious errors in the big-picture ideas that these teachers present. They don't simply misspeak or occasionally say something unclearly; these people are perverting the Gospel almost every time they open their mouths publicly, and Hanegraaff reveals this. Secondly, he doesn't do it in a mean-spirited or unkind manner. He's gentle and loving about it, concerned for the souls of the people who listen to these false teachers AND the false teachers themselves. The tone of the book is firm, and even aggressive at times, but Hanegraaff carefully avoids ad hominems and vitriolic attitudes.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    I have skimmed a bit of the book already. I have been aware of this book for years (I have the old version on my bookshelf), I am happy to have this updated version (quite impressed with additional information and format). I came out of the "Word of Faith Movement" in the late 1980's/early 1990's. I attended and graduated from Rhema Bible Training Center (Kenneth Hagin's school) in 1980, 1981. This book is so revealing, and shows the error of the WOF, I'm so blessed the Lord brought me out of th I have skimmed a bit of the book already. I have been aware of this book for years (I have the old version on my bookshelf), I am happy to have this updated version (quite impressed with additional information and format). I came out of the "Word of Faith Movement" in the late 1980's/early 1990's. I attended and graduated from Rhema Bible Training Center (Kenneth Hagin's school) in 1980, 1981. This book is so revealing, and shows the error of the WOF, I'm so blessed the Lord brought me out of these false teachings.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Brenneman

    This book is a criticism of the teaching of many popular Word of Faith teachers, like Benny Hinn, Kenneth Copeland, Joel Osteen, ect. Most of the criticisms are based on severe misrepresentations of what the teachers in question actually said. I was amazed at how grossly the author twisted their words in some cases. It seemed like it bordered on downright dishonesty. The only area in which I thought many of the criticisms were actually fair was the chapter "Wealth and want". Some of the people i This book is a criticism of the teaching of many popular Word of Faith teachers, like Benny Hinn, Kenneth Copeland, Joel Osteen, ect. Most of the criticisms are based on severe misrepresentations of what the teachers in question actually said. I was amazed at how grossly the author twisted their words in some cases. It seemed like it bordered on downright dishonesty. The only area in which I thought many of the criticisms were actually fair was the chapter "Wealth and want". Some of the people in question actually have taught a gospel of money at times, that goes far beyond any biblical prosperity teaching, even going so far as making money a means of salvation. However, it should be noted that Kenneth Hagin himself rebuked many of the younger leaders in the WOF movement over their abuses in this very area, before his death. I certainly don't think any of the people whom Hank Hanegraaff called into question are above criticism. However, most of the criticism in this book is quite unfair and is a gross distortion of what these people actually teach and believe.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    Sometimes Hanegraaff seems like a witch hunter, tracking down false teaching and false teachers. But I so appreciate his desire to make people aware of what is going on in the world. I listened to this one on an audio book...way back in the day. To hear these guys say these things with their own lips is many times nothing short of blasphemous. This public confrontation is necessary as these false teachings are blatantly belittling the words of our King...all over the world. The update to this boo Sometimes Hanegraaff seems like a witch hunter, tracking down false teaching and false teachers. But I so appreciate his desire to make people aware of what is going on in the world. I listened to this one on an audio book...way back in the day. To hear these guys say these things with their own lips is many times nothing short of blasphemous. This public confrontation is necessary as these false teachings are blatantly belittling the words of our King...all over the world. The update to this book - Christianity in Crisis Twenty First Century is worth the read as well - highlighting the current teachings which sadly, continue to bring shame to the Name.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dav

    . Christianity in Crisis: The 21st Century by Hank Hanegraaff, a revised edition published in 2009, over 400 pages. Synopsis: Nearly two decades ago Hank Hanegraaff’s award-winning Christianity in Crisis alerted the world to the dangers of a cultic movement within Christianity that threatened to undermine the very foundation of biblical faith [aka, the health & wealth gospel]. But in the 21st century, there are new dangers—new teachers who threaten to do more damage than the last. These are not obs . Christianity in Crisis: The 21st Century by Hank Hanegraaff, a revised edition published in 2009, over 400 pages. Synopsis: Nearly two decades ago Hank Hanegraaff’s award-winning Christianity in Crisis alerted the world to the dangers of a cultic movement within Christianity that threatened to undermine the very foundation of biblical faith [aka, the health & wealth gospel]. But in the 21st century, there are new dangers—new teachers who threaten to do more damage than the last. These are not obscure teachers that Hanegraaff unmasks. We know their names. We have seen their faces, sat in their churches, and heard them shamelessly preach and promote the false pretexts of a give-to-get gospel. They are virtual rock stars who command the attention of presidential candidates and media moguls. Through make-believe miracles, urban legends, counterfeit Christs, and twisted theological reasoning, they peddle an occult brand of metaphysics that continues to shipwreck the faith of millions around the globe: [examples of the heresy] “God cannot do anything in this earthly realm unless we give Him permission.” “Keep saying it—‘I have equality with God’—talk yourself into it.” “Being poor is a sin.” “The Jews were not rejecting Jesus as Messiah; it was Jesus who was refusing to be the Messiah to the Jews!” “You create your own world the same way God creates His. He speaks, and things happen; you speak, and they happen.” Christianity in Crisis: 21st Century exposes darkness to light, pointing us back to a Christianity centered in Christ. From the Preface: “Having lost the ability to think biblically, postmodern Christians are being transformed from cultural change agents and initiators into cultural conformists and imitators. Pop culture beckons, and postmodern Christians have taken the bait. As a result, the biblical model of faith has given way to an increasingly bizarre array of fads and formulas.” .. .

  7. 5 out of 5

    Randy Corn

    I have to say that it was easy and compelling reading. Essentially, it is something of a critique of the “Prosperity Gospel” or what might more accurately be called the Faith Movement. The author does a thorough job of documenting some of the most bizarre claims of men like Hagin, Copeland, and Hinn. I was also a bit surprised to see the connection between these “Christian” ministers and such things as Christian Science. Indeed, the author contends that these fellahs have moved all the way into I have to say that it was easy and compelling reading. Essentially, it is something of a critique of the “Prosperity Gospel” or what might more accurately be called the Faith Movement. The author does a thorough job of documenting some of the most bizarre claims of men like Hagin, Copeland, and Hinn. I was also a bit surprised to see the connection between these “Christian” ministers and such things as Christian Science. Indeed, the author contends that these fellahs have moved all the way into the cultic realm and perhaps even beyond it to the occult realm. One feature of this book that I found interesting is the use the author makes of acrostics. He seems to have perhaps a dozen of them for all sorts of things. I wonder if this is because they were first developed for his radio program? In any case, this book will supply me with some of the ammunition I need to attack these wolves in sheep’s clothing. The only negative I have for this book is that it repeats itself on more than one point. I really think that the author is trying to contextualize his points, but it seems a bit tedious at times. I really think the book could have made the same point and have been 50 to 100 pages shorter. Still, it is only a minor flaw.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Pastor Greg

    I'm not a big fan of Hank. But I'll save my reasons and explain why I still gave this book 4 stars. This book was well-written, well-documented and an effective tool for helping folks see the errors of the Word Faith movement. I shared my copy several times, recommended it to others who purchased copies (including several pastors) and all either came out of this cultic movement or, not being in it in the first place, were better equipped to answer questions and concerns brought to them. This book I'm not a big fan of Hank. But I'll save my reasons and explain why I still gave this book 4 stars. This book was well-written, well-documented and an effective tool for helping folks see the errors of the Word Faith movement. I shared my copy several times, recommended it to others who purchased copies (including several pastors) and all either came out of this cultic movement or, not being in it in the first place, were better equipped to answer questions and concerns brought to them. This book has every quality you want in an apologetics book intended for popular use. Except the use of new versions and the fact that it was authored by someone I do not have a great deal of respect for. But that only warranted deduction of 1 star because it has borne some good fruit.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Klinger

    Great Book As always Hank nails it. False preachers, teachers and so called "prophets" will deceive the widows, the poor, the suffering, and the hurting without batting an eye. Taking these peoples last dollars with no conscience and promising things that will never happen. Sending people down the road to hell. Great Book As always Hank nails it. False preachers, teachers and so called "prophets" will deceive the widows, the poor, the suffering, and the hurting without batting an eye. Taking these peoples last dollars with no conscience and promising things that will never happen. Sending people down the road to hell.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brit

    Easy to read and a must read for Christmas who wants a better understanding of what is preached by the health, wealth and glory gospel.

  11. 5 out of 5

    SGT Vincent Syndab

    If you’re seeking truth I would like to thank men like this who are on the frontline defending our faith like we all should

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sheila Myers

    Although this book was written almost 30 years ago, the information is still applicable today.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dav

    . Christianity in Crisis By Hank Hanegraaff, published 1992, over 400 pages. OVERVIEW: "When the book Christianity in Crisis was released it instantly became a bestseller. The vast majority expressed appreciation for the landmark work- yet some found it difficult to accept that anyone within the body of Christ could make the bizarre and blasphemous statements documented in this book. Frequently they said "Until I hear it with my own ears, I will not believe it." Hear Kenneth Hagin, Kenneth Copeland . Christianity in Crisis By Hank Hanegraaff, published 1992, over 400 pages. OVERVIEW: "When the book Christianity in Crisis was released it instantly became a bestseller. The vast majority expressed appreciation for the landmark work- yet some found it difficult to accept that anyone within the body of Christ could make the bizarre and blasphemous statements documented in this book. Frequently they said "Until I hear it with my own ears, I will not believe it." Hear Kenneth Hagin, Kenneth Copeland, Benny Hinn, Frederick Price, Morris Cerullo and others define and defend doctrines that have systematically obliterated the essentials of the Christian faith. Listen as the faith teachers speak for themselves, and then you decide." The TBN (Trinity Broadcasting Network) prosperity preachers, faux healers and many others are todays version of the false teachers Saint Paul warned about. They are bilking their audience, getting rich off of their duped viewers. In many cases filthy rich. They promise healing if you can just muster the right kind of faith. When healing doesn't come it's you & your lack of proper faith that's at fault. Scripture twisting is a big part of the problem. Just because the bible records something, it doesn't mean you're required to do it; context & discernment are a requirement. They would have us treat God as a cosmic vending machine. You put in the correct "coin" ( a tithe, a special prayer, faith, or certain words) and you can choose to have anything you want--prosperity as God intended. These preeminent men & women preachers, rich as they are, can't heal themselves. They wear glasses, have medical conditions & die of all manner of diseases. Benny Hinn claimed to have raised a dead man & denied the claim when interviewed by secular news. He was asked to bring his much lauded healing powers into local hospitals, he declined. "It wouldn't be the right atmosphere," he said. Many people seeking help, seeking God through these performers end up dejected & disillusioned. They turn away from faith & christianity thinking it doesn't work. Hank's book is a warning to all these false teachers and to congregants, don't let yourself be fooled. . Well-researched & documented. AN IMPORTANT BOOK FOR THE FAITHFULL. As it happens, all of this religious huckstery is humorously portrayed in the Steve Martin film Leap of Faith . Touring, word-faith evangelist Jonas (played by Martin) bilks the christians and "puts on a good show." Then to spite him & despite all the flimflam, God Himself heals someone. The real life scams, as detailed in Hank's book, exploits & harms the Church, harms those of sincere faith and all those seeking help--and it's shameful. The crisis persists and so, in 2009, the author (Hank Hanegraaff) published Christianity In Crisis: The 21st Century where Hank readdresses the problem. .. .

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ben Zajdel

    Hank Hanegraaff goes on an all-out assault on Word of Faith teachers in his new book, Christianity in Crisis 21st Century. One can almost feel his frustration with the state of "Faith" Christianity pouring out of the pages. The result is a book that is passionate and full of good information, but poorly written. Hanegraaff starts out by stating his intent and purpose of writing the book, then launches into a chapter titled "Cast of Characters." This chapter is basically a roster of Faith teacher Hank Hanegraaff goes on an all-out assault on Word of Faith teachers in his new book, Christianity in Crisis 21st Century. One can almost feel his frustration with the state of "Faith" Christianity pouring out of the pages. The result is a book that is passionate and full of good information, but poorly written. Hanegraaff starts out by stating his intent and purpose of writing the book, then launches into a chapter titled "Cast of Characters." This chapter is basically a roster of Faith teachers he considers heretical, such as Joel Osteen, Joyce Meyer, Kenneth Hagin, John Hagee, Creflo Dollar, T.D. Jakes, Benny Hinn, and many more. Hanegraaff uses quotes from their writings and sermons extensively, erasing the possibility that he can be accused of misquoting or putting words in their mouths. The best thing about this book is that Hanegraaff doesn't just expose these leaders' teachings as shallow and materialistic, but also points out the heresies that many of them preach on a daily basis. Take this quote from Creflo Dollar for instance: "Because you came from God you are gods--you're not just human." Hanegraaff then lays out his plan for exposing these teachers and defending against their doctrines. It involves practicing spiritual disciplines daily and extensively. There are also three appendices in the book that relate to apologetics and Christian creeds. However, this book is about one hundred pages too long. Hanegraaff is just a little too detailed and research-oriented. In his attempt to accurately document Faith teachers' unorthodoxies, he repeats himself constantly and becomes boring. He uses the same quotes numerous times throughout the book, several of them more than twice. The book becomes repetitive. Also slightly annoying is Hanegraaff's use of acronyms. Just a preview of all the different acronyms: FLAWS, MEALS, ABCDE, and FACTS, in addition to LIGHTS, which is from another book but gets mentioned numerous times. You'll have to read the book to find out what they actually mean, but it's safe to say that Hanegraaff likes to break things down analytically. He also takes numerous opportunities to plug his various books and Bibles. Overall, this is a book that needed to be written. I would have just liked to see better quality. I applaud Hanegraff for cataloguing these leaders' writings and writing a Christian response to them. The book is definitely worth checking out, but I would recommend looking it over in a bookstore before buying it. Some people will be turned off by its textbook feel. I gave it two stars for the material, but wasn't happy with much else.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dale

    Important book but in serious need of an editor Christianity in Crisis: The 21st Century exposes the serious flaws in the theology of most of America's famous TV preachers, especially the cavalcade of larger than life ministers that appear around the country on Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN). Basically, the doctrines are called "prosperity" and "faith". The faith doctrine is the most insidious because it sounds so harmless. Shouldn't all Christians have faith? Well, this doctrine is somet Important book but in serious need of an editor Christianity in Crisis: The 21st Century exposes the serious flaws in the theology of most of America's famous TV preachers, especially the cavalcade of larger than life ministers that appear around the country on Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN). Basically, the doctrines are called "prosperity" and "faith". The faith doctrine is the most insidious because it sounds so harmless. Shouldn't all Christians have faith? Well, this doctrine is something quite different and odd. Joel Osteen may be the most famous teacher of this doctrine right now. It's easily searchable on the web and this book does a great job of exposing its flaws as well. Suffice it to say that it is not a Christian idea, but much more like the New Age stuff taught in books like The Secret. Prosperity theology is more famous because any viewer of a TBN program can watch its preachers telling viewer things like this, "When you tithe, God gives to you. When you don't tithe God takes it away from you." (p. 46) The promise is that you will get stuff from God if you tithe. God is like a divine bank account. Preacher Jesse Duplantis noted that God is a comforter "because when you get some stuff it brings you comfort." (p. 198) Wow, as great a perversion of the concept as I've ever heard. Joyce Meyer notes that giving to God is like getting a "receipt" or an IOU from God that you can draw on later on.(p. 222) So, who cares. Can't these people worship as they please?... Read more at: http://dwdsreviews.blogspot.com/2011/...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Richard Fitzgerald

    Hanegraaff is an engaging writer. However, in this book he misrepresents and quotes out of context far too frequently. He does not seem to have a handle on much of the Word of Faith theology. He lumps diverse perspectives together like it is a more cohesive movement than is true in reality. He frequently uses pejorative terms to sway the reader emotionally instead of rationally arguing his case. Often, when writers use emotional tactics, like Hanegraaff uses on nearly every page, it is because t Hanegraaff is an engaging writer. However, in this book he misrepresents and quotes out of context far too frequently. He does not seem to have a handle on much of the Word of Faith theology. He lumps diverse perspectives together like it is a more cohesive movement than is true in reality. He frequently uses pejorative terms to sway the reader emotionally instead of rationally arguing his case. Often, when writers use emotional tactics, like Hanegraaff uses on nearly every page, it is because their foundational argument is shaky. That is the case with this book. Ironically, Hanegraaff stuffs the text with formulaic doctrinal systems while criticizing the Word of Faith teachers for using formulaic doctrinal systems. Hanegraaffs's theology is often more critically erroneous than the theology he is castigating. He appears to have an eschatology derived from Plato more than the Bible, and his theology of redemption is borderline pagan. I could almost hear the drumbeats as the virgin was thrown into the flaming volcano as an innocent sacrifice when he described his understanding of atonement. His fixation on the cross goes beyond a cruciform theology. It almost seems as though Hanegraaff does not think the resurrection essential to God's redemptive work. Paul strenuously disagreed and taught that if it ended at the cross, we are to be pitied more than all others. Does the Word of Faith movement have teachings and practices deserving of criticism? All movements have reasons to be criticized, and there have been well-written critiques of the Word of Faith movement. For all its colorful and engaging prose this is not one of those critiques worthy of extended engagement.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Orville Jenkins

    An update of the earlier Christianity in Crisis. The author provides an exposé and refutation of the Word of Faith or Prosperity Gospel cult, also known as Name it and Claim It, that has become so popular in recent years. This volume was very enlightening and made me aware of some names I did not know and some with which I was only vaguely familiar. The author goes through a detailed analysis of various proponents of this prosperity gospel. He points up some of the specific teachings and underlyi An update of the earlier Christianity in Crisis. The author provides an exposé and refutation of the Word of Faith or Prosperity Gospel cult, also known as Name it and Claim It, that has become so popular in recent years. This volume was very enlightening and made me aware of some names I did not know and some with which I was only vaguely familiar. The author goes through a detailed analysis of various proponents of this prosperity gospel. He points up some of the specific teachings and underlying philosophies of some of the TV preachers of this ilk. I have personally found that some of the personalities in this Prosperity movement have more focus on biblical themes than others. Some seem highly syncretized and draw upon eastern thought motifs popular in the last century in the business world, a mystical approach of thinking your success and claiming it mentally to make it happen. While the author exposes the extra-biblical sources of much current thinking and reasoning, and likewise decries the fundamentalist mishandling of the Scriptures for ideological purposes, his own reductionist arguments from an ideological perspective suffer the same rationalist errors in some cases. But his sincerity and commitment to the biblical perspective is clear. This is an excellent read and will provide good insights and understanding of the Word of Faith ("Prosperity Gospel") Movement.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cafelilybookreviews

    I read Christianity in Crisis by Hank Hanegraaff with mixed emotions. While I agree whole heartedly with his stance against “rock star”, celebrity ministers who are leading people astray, I found myself wishing he had spent more time teaching balance and context instead of bashing. Though his facts may be accurate – his approach came across very terse. The first part of this book made me feel as if I had picked up a trashy gossip magazine. At chapter 25 (Amen), Hanegraaff begins to write about ge I read Christianity in Crisis by Hank Hanegraaff with mixed emotions. While I agree whole heartedly with his stance against “rock star”, celebrity ministers who are leading people astray, I found myself wishing he had spent more time teaching balance and context instead of bashing. Though his facts may be accurate – his approach came across very terse. The first part of this book made me feel as if I had picked up a trashy gossip magazine. At chapter 25 (Amen), Hanegraaff begins to write about getting back from the counterfit, to the reality of victorious Christian living. The last four chapters of the book made more sense to me, than the first 24. I think that Hanegraaff’s time and energy would have been better spent if he had devoted his ENTIRE book on teaching the basics of sound biblical doctrine, rather than exposing the faults and flaws of others. One of the best ways to teach others how to spot the counterfit, is not to focus on the counterfit, but to make sure they understand and know the authentic. One of my biggest concerns about this book is that others read it and take offense at “faith” and the gospel workers who encourage them to “live by faith” or “have faith in God”. Without faith, it is impossible to please God. While I appreciate Hank Hanegraaff’s zeal in exposing the abuse and perversion of faith, I felt his approach could have been better.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Eye-opening. I would consider this a must-read for any "true" Christ-follower...if for no other reason, than to be aware of all the false teachings that are out there, and to think honestly about your own doctrine. Why do you believe what you believe? How solid is your knowledge of scripture, God, etc? When challenged on your own beliefs, how strongly are you convicted of their truths? The over-arching point of this book is to say that if you don't know what you believe and why - then it is EASY Eye-opening. I would consider this a must-read for any "true" Christ-follower...if for no other reason, than to be aware of all the false teachings that are out there, and to think honestly about your own doctrine. Why do you believe what you believe? How solid is your knowledge of scripture, God, etc? When challenged on your own beliefs, how strongly are you convicted of their truths? The over-arching point of this book is to say that if you don't know what you believe and why - then it is EASY to be sucked in to all the false doctrines and teachings that exist (like so many have over the years). Unfortunately, all of the "faith" teachers and other false prophets disguise their teachings so incredibly well as true that it can be extremely difficult to differentiate between what is true and what is simply a sheep in wolf's clothing. You will be surprised at the many common and popular names that Hanegraaff calls out as false teachers of the scripture -- and his overwhelming evidence is pretty damning.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    In a recently updated Christianity in Crisis, Hank Hanegraaff continues his assault on "Faith teachers". You may recognize a couple of names: Joel Osteen and Joyce Meyer. He adds their name to the club of preachers including: Benny Hinn and Oral Roberts. (we'll call them slightly crazy preachers) In this updated book, Hanegraaff reveals the errors in the message these faith preachers share and how it is so far different than what the Bible teaches, that they are practically cultists! He speaks out In a recently updated Christianity in Crisis, Hank Hanegraaff continues his assault on "Faith teachers". You may recognize a couple of names: Joel Osteen and Joyce Meyer. He adds their name to the club of preachers including: Benny Hinn and Oral Roberts. (we'll call them slightly crazy preachers) In this updated book, Hanegraaff reveals the errors in the message these faith preachers share and how it is so far different than what the Bible teaches, that they are practically cultists! He speaks out against their teaching of the power of words and how you can speak yourself to wealth, health and influence. The Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN) gets hammered hard by Hanegraaff's attacks of heresy. I don't follow the teachings of Osteen, Meyer or the other Faith teachers. I do know them as televangelists and so-called prosperity teachers. I agree on most of the things Hanegraaff has to say in this book. But I do wonder about the power of words... When all is said and done, it is clear that you do not want to be on the receiving end of a Hank Hanegraaff

  21. 5 out of 5

    Crumbsonmyfloor

    I was so happy to receive this book in the mail. I was a bit worried since it is over 300 pages. But once I got started, I couldn’t put it down. It went into the definintion of cults in the beginning, something I was interested in. Then into the *cast of characters*. Putting names out there like Joyce Meyer and Joel Osteen and who can’t forget Benny Hinn. I have always thought of the first two as always candy coating their words. Putting sugar on the word of God because they believe that so many p I was so happy to receive this book in the mail. I was a bit worried since it is over 300 pages. But once I got started, I couldn’t put it down. It went into the definintion of cults in the beginning, something I was interested in. Then into the *cast of characters*. Putting names out there like Joyce Meyer and Joel Osteen and who can’t forget Benny Hinn. I have always thought of the first two as always candy coating their words. Putting sugar on the word of God because they believe that so many people can’t get it. The word of God doesn’t need any sugar. Goodness, he could have just stopped here with this chapter (which is 71 pages) but he went on to talk about Faith and cover ups. And of course Satan himself. Something else I was interested in. If your going to be doing any traveling this summer with the family and need a good book to take along, get a copy of this one.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    I couldn't help feeling like, as I read this book, I was reading a book about the "religious right" written by the mainstream media. It is a collection of sound bytes and quotes that make charismatic teaching seem extreme and dangerous. While most of the teachers that he quotes I don't generally read or listen to, I have found that the charismatic world has it's crazy quacks, but also has some solid Biblical teaching. Anwyay, just my two cents. If I read this book knowing nothing about the chari I couldn't help feeling like, as I read this book, I was reading a book about the "religious right" written by the mainstream media. It is a collection of sound bytes and quotes that make charismatic teaching seem extreme and dangerous. While most of the teachers that he quotes I don't generally read or listen to, I have found that the charismatic world has it's crazy quacks, but also has some solid Biblical teaching. Anwyay, just my two cents. If I read this book knowing nothing about the charismatic world, I would be alarmed, up in arms and fearful, which is too bad, because God has done so much in my life in the past few years. My life has changed and my my relationship with Him is different, partly because of charismatic influences. He is good.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cory Howell

    Excellent! Hank Hanegraaff does a thorough job at explaining the myriad errors of the Word-Faith movement. He quite correctly points out that their errors are not simply a matter of disagreeing on minor points, but rather a radical departure from essential Christian doctrine. I have seen several reviews of this book in which people complain that it's not fair for Hank to criticize other sincere Christians. I find those reviews frightening. If people are leading hundreds of thousands of believers Excellent! Hank Hanegraaff does a thorough job at explaining the myriad errors of the Word-Faith movement. He quite correctly points out that their errors are not simply a matter of disagreeing on minor points, but rather a radical departure from essential Christian doctrine. I have seen several reviews of this book in which people complain that it's not fair for Hank to criticize other sincere Christians. I find those reviews frightening. If people are leading hundreds of thousands of believers astray, isn't that great cause for alarm? I know many well-meaning Christians who would not spend two minutes talking to a Mormon, Jehovah's Witness, or Scientologist, but they think Joel Osteen is GREAT! Hanegraaff proves otherwise.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    This review is of the Barnes & Noble Nook eBook. I've long admired Hank Hanegraaff's ability to clearly, yet thoroughly, teach a subject. I learned a tremendous amount about the Faith movement through this book, and my only complaint is that in his effort to be thorough, Mr. Hanegraaff is sometimes a little redundant. Having said that, the editing of this book was amazingly sloppy. I don't know if it was because of the conversion to eBook or if the print version shares these flaws, but the book co This review is of the Barnes & Noble Nook eBook. I've long admired Hank Hanegraaff's ability to clearly, yet thoroughly, teach a subject. I learned a tremendous amount about the Faith movement through this book, and my only complaint is that in his effort to be thorough, Mr. Hanegraaff is sometimes a little redundant. Having said that, the editing of this book was amazingly sloppy. I don't know if it was because of the conversion to eBook or if the print version shares these flaws, but the book contained frequent errors in capitalization and punctuation. In one place, there was even a missing section heading. I expected better.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    It’s kind of embarrassing when you turn on the TV and see some snail-oil salesman representing him/herself off as Christian. Sometimes it’s not so obvious, and to those who are not already grounded in orthodoxy, it’s almost impossible to see though the subtle twisting and changing of sound Christian doctrine within the “Word of Faith” movement. This is a good book in “calling out” many of those you may have thought to be orthodox and who use the word “Christian” but may be far from the historic It’s kind of embarrassing when you turn on the TV and see some snail-oil salesman representing him/herself off as Christian. Sometimes it’s not so obvious, and to those who are not already grounded in orthodoxy, it’s almost impossible to see though the subtle twisting and changing of sound Christian doctrine within the “Word of Faith” movement. This is a good book in “calling out” many of those you may have thought to be orthodox and who use the word “Christian” but may be far from the historical and Biblical faith.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mike Lewis

    This book was very well written, but just didn't appeal to me too much (so three stars just on my personal preference). This was a great book if you needed to know more about the Faith movements out there. Hanegraaff goes through very systematically and provides citations for many of the statements he quotes in the book. If you or someone you know is involved or being influenced by these "faith" movements, this would be a great book to start with. He also provided some great foundations on the b This book was very well written, but just didn't appeal to me too much (so three stars just on my personal preference). This was a great book if you needed to know more about the Faith movements out there. Hanegraaff goes through very systematically and provides citations for many of the statements he quotes in the book. If you or someone you know is involved or being influenced by these "faith" movements, this would be a great book to start with. He also provided some great foundations on the bible at the end of the book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael Vincent

    A good updated version of his older work. He has excellent notes and references concerning his debate with the Faith teachers. In many ways it is more of a resource (It took me years to get through) than something just to sit down and read, but worth the time from a well-respected, popular, theologian. I would caution readers that his amillennial view of the end times passages shows in several discussions, but overall a helpful book. Years ago I read his earlier book, but appreciate that the upd A good updated version of his older work. He has excellent notes and references concerning his debate with the Faith teachers. In many ways it is more of a resource (It took me years to get through) than something just to sit down and read, but worth the time from a well-respected, popular, theologian. I would caution readers that his amillennial view of the end times passages shows in several discussions, but overall a helpful book. Years ago I read his earlier book, but appreciate that the updated version is actually updated with helpful, new material.

  28. 5 out of 5

    D Posey

    A sobering look at modern Christianity and the so called Faith Movement. At times this book is frustrating, maddening, and overall left me with a profound sadness for those who are being deeply wounded by unbiblical teachings. Hank pulls no punches and the book contains enough footnotes to create a second book. A must read for those that may be struggling with how to address clear biblical errors within the church.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Judah

    Eye opening and highly recommended to anyone of the Christian faith. Hanegraaf tears apart the unbiblical lies of TD Jakes, John Hagee, Joyce Meyers, and Joel Olsteen. The only downside is it's long and tend to repeat itself (especially with the use of long quotes , some appearing 4-5 times). After finishing, I believe it was done intentionally as this is meant more as a reference book than a quick read. Eye opening and highly recommended to anyone of the Christian faith. Hanegraaf tears apart the unbiblical lies of TD Jakes, John Hagee, Joyce Meyers, and Joel Olsteen. The only downside is it's long and tend to repeat itself (especially with the use of long quotes , some appearing 4-5 times). After finishing, I believe it was done intentionally as this is meant more as a reference book than a quick read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ivy Overby

    Interesting book about the faith movement in Christianity.i.e. TV evangelists. I grew up with this stuff and am finding it interesting how some of the (I'll say it) heresies have lingered for me. So it's been a good thing for me to reevaluate some of my theology. I'm going to see if my mom will read it too. Interesting book about the faith movement in Christianity.i.e. TV evangelists. I grew up with this stuff and am finding it interesting how some of the (I'll say it) heresies have lingered for me. So it's been a good thing for me to reevaluate some of my theology. I'm going to see if my mom will read it too.

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