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Novels by Ken Follett: The Pillars of the Earth, World Without End, the Third Twin, Eye of the Needle, the Key to Rebecca, Hornet Flight, a Place Called Freedom

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Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: The Pillars of the Earth, World Without End, the Third Twin, Eye of the Needle, the Key to Rebecca, Hornet Flight, a Place Called Freedom, Night Over Water, on Wings of Eagles, the Man Fr Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: The Pillars of the Earth, World Without End, the Third Twin, Eye of the Needle, the Key to Rebecca, Hornet Flight, a Place Called Freedom, Night Over Water, on Wings of Eagles, the Man From St. Petersburg, Code to Zero, Jackdaws, the Hammer of Eden, Whiteout. Excerpt: A Place Called Freedom A Place Called Freedom is a work of historical fiction by Ken Follett . Set in 1767, it follows the adventures of an idealistic young coal miner from Scotland who believes there must be more to life than working down the pit. The miner, Mack McAsh, eventually runs away in order to find work and a new life in London . Eventually McAsh becomes a leader amongst the working classes of the city and becomes a target for those vested interest groups who do not share his point of view. McAsh is framed for a crime he did not commit and sent to serve seven years hard labour in the colony of Virginia where he is forced to find a new life. Historical events from the novel The novel initially deals with subject of the 'Payment of Arles', a form of serfdom for miners in the 18th century which meant that once a miner started work in a coal mine he was bound to the mine for the rest of his life. It was a custom for the master or landowner of the mine to give a gift to parents at the time of a child's baptism. The gift would then bind the child to work alongside the parents when they came of age. In London the novel places McAsh at the center of the discontent of 1768 which saw working people become dissatisfied with a higher cost of living and poor wages. McAsh had become the leader of a gang of coal heavers, one of many such gangs of men who had the job of physically unloading the coal barges when they came into the city. The discontent eventually led to riots and unrest across the city. After being caught...


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Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: The Pillars of the Earth, World Without End, the Third Twin, Eye of the Needle, the Key to Rebecca, Hornet Flight, a Place Called Freedom, Night Over Water, on Wings of Eagles, the Man Fr Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: The Pillars of the Earth, World Without End, the Third Twin, Eye of the Needle, the Key to Rebecca, Hornet Flight, a Place Called Freedom, Night Over Water, on Wings of Eagles, the Man From St. Petersburg, Code to Zero, Jackdaws, the Hammer of Eden, Whiteout. Excerpt: A Place Called Freedom A Place Called Freedom is a work of historical fiction by Ken Follett . Set in 1767, it follows the adventures of an idealistic young coal miner from Scotland who believes there must be more to life than working down the pit. The miner, Mack McAsh, eventually runs away in order to find work and a new life in London . Eventually McAsh becomes a leader amongst the working classes of the city and becomes a target for those vested interest groups who do not share his point of view. McAsh is framed for a crime he did not commit and sent to serve seven years hard labour in the colony of Virginia where he is forced to find a new life. Historical events from the novel The novel initially deals with subject of the 'Payment of Arles', a form of serfdom for miners in the 18th century which meant that once a miner started work in a coal mine he was bound to the mine for the rest of his life. It was a custom for the master or landowner of the mine to give a gift to parents at the time of a child's baptism. The gift would then bind the child to work alongside the parents when they came of age. In London the novel places McAsh at the center of the discontent of 1768 which saw working people become dissatisfied with a higher cost of living and poor wages. McAsh had become the leader of a gang of coal heavers, one of many such gangs of men who had the job of physically unloading the coal barges when they came into the city. The discontent eventually led to riots and unrest across the city. After being caught...

30 review for Novels by Ken Follett: The Pillars of the Earth, World Without End, the Third Twin, Eye of the Needle, the Key to Rebecca, Hornet Flight, a Place Called Freedom

  1. 4 out of 5

    Meca

    The investment of time and effort is takes to keep my eyes open are not worth the outcome of the unclimatic storylines....needless to say, Im bored.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Youngdahl

    I enjoy historical novels and Ken Follett is probably one of my favorite authors. Each book becomes a friend and so hard to put down. I even get sad when I'm reading the last chapter of each book. I especially enjoyed The Pillars of the Earth and World Without End, and Edge of Eternity. I enjoy historical novels and Ken Follett is probably one of my favorite authors. Each book becomes a friend and so hard to put down. I even get sad when I'm reading the last chapter of each book. I especially enjoyed The Pillars of the Earth and World Without End, and Edge of Eternity.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Pam Kirst

    “…In both cases, weakness and scruples had defeated strength and ruthlessness. William felt he would never understand it.” (p.908, The Pillars of the Earth) Brutal. It’s the only word for the actions of some of the powerful, arrogant, ambitious characters in Ken Follett’s The Pillars of the Earth. There were scenes that were devastating to read—Aliena’s rape; the death of the miller as the knights pulled down his mill, bringing, inexorably, the heavy millstone down upon the miller. The death sce “…In both cases, weakness and scruples had defeated strength and ruthlessness. William felt he would never understand it.” (p.908, The Pillars of the Earth) Brutal. It’s the only word for the actions of some of the powerful, arrogant, ambitious characters in Ken Follett’s The Pillars of the Earth. There were scenes that were devastating to read—Aliena’s rape; the death of the miller as the knights pulled down his mill, bringing, inexorably, the heavy millstone down upon the miller. The death scene of Thomas Becket. Oh, my God; people can be so evil. Yet the story take place in the framework of a cathedral, literally—the beginning of Follett’s work leads directly to the beginning of the Kingsbridge building project. As the foundation is laid, the relationships are forged—loyalties, enmities, uneasy alliances—that will shape the story. What a savage time, in many ways—the 1100’s—and yet it brought us beauty, the incredible architectural breakthroughs of the soaring cathedrals of Europe. As hopeless and degrading as life is for many of the characters in Pillars, there’s always sunlight breaking through a tiny crack. Some men treat women in bestial ways; but some women rise above the times to become successful. The Church condones unforgiveable acts; but some of its own lead lives of such integrity and goodness that I can see what the Church is meant to be. At my own church this week, we are talking about forgiveness. We struggle to understand why a loving God allows acts of unspeakable cruelty to happen—especially to children, the disabled, the defenseless. We talk about free will. I think what Pastor Steve is leading us to see is this: a just God does not condone or preordain human acts of aggression and brutality. But God creates the possibility of learning, healing, and redemption when the hard things happen. Redemption happens in The Pillars of the Earth. So many people—Aliena, Jack, Phillip, Martha—are forever changed by the things that they have endured—conscious abuses of power that hurt them irrevocably. But they do not give in to the desperate need for revenge; instead, they work to create. And so an earldom is restored to a just ruler, who leads the people dependent upon him (her) to prosperity. The priory, once lackluster and spiritless, becomes a place of grace and sanctity. Inconsequential Knightsbridge becomes the Bishop’s seat. And from the literal ashes of a burned wooden church rises a phenomenal cathedral. The Pillars of the Earth, just shy of 1,000 pages is a sweeping read, but worth the investment of time and the endurance of difficult scenes. This is truly a triumphant book. Please see http://www.ken-follett.com for more about this book (which has been made into a mini-series) and its author.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    I'm rereading this historical fiction piece in coordination with watching the TV presentation. As usual, the book has much more depth and development than the video production, but it is interesting to see how well the characters are reflected on screen. Follett is one of my favorite authors and WWE does not disappoint. His excellent character development and effective story lines hold my interest when many other authors fall flat. His insight into the social structure and power machinations of I'm rereading this historical fiction piece in coordination with watching the TV presentation. As usual, the book has much more depth and development than the video production, but it is interesting to see how well the characters are reflected on screen. Follett is one of my favorite authors and WWE does not disappoint. His excellent character development and effective story lines hold my interest when many other authors fall flat. His insight into the social structure and power machinations of the 14th century provide a keyhole peek into the formation of today's world of politics and religion.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Glenda

    Pillars of the Earth and World Without End... very interesting stories of the early Europe... 1100's through 1400's... good work. Pillars of the Earth and World Without End... very interesting stories of the early Europe... 1100's through 1400's... good work.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Terri Hjelm

    The nature / nurture question was presented too simplistically making the novel feel a little bit outdated. I enjoyed the suspense even though the ending got too far fetched. I liked the ending.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Liz Cowan

    Riveting books

  8. 5 out of 5

    Debby Sketchley

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

  10. 5 out of 5

    Karolina

  11. 5 out of 5

    Odile

  12. 5 out of 5

    John-patrick Sansom

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Aristeguieta

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alena DavidoffGore

  16. 5 out of 5

    stephen e. yoken

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sfrith

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  19. 5 out of 5

    Woofwoof

  20. 4 out of 5

    Diane

  21. 5 out of 5

    Raymond Hall

  22. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Woods

  23. 5 out of 5

    Donna St

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hon

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lene Brooks

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tony Houpt

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jo

  28. 4 out of 5

    Judy Small

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jaimee Gerard

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gm Lauer

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