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The Smithsonian Collection of Newspaper Comics

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A collection of the most critically acclaimed American comic strips, from Yellow Kid of 1896 to such admired contemporary works as Peanuts, B.C. and Doonesbury. Old favourites Katzenjammer Kids, Mutt and Jeff, Gasoline Alley, Bringing up Father, Mickey Mouse, Little Orphan Annie, Dick Tracy, L'il Abner, Barnaby, Pogo and many more fill this collection of American comic cla A collection of the most critically acclaimed American comic strips, from Yellow Kid of 1896 to such admired contemporary works as Peanuts, B.C. and Doonesbury. Old favourites Katzenjammer Kids, Mutt and Jeff, Gasoline Alley, Bringing up Father, Mickey Mouse, Little Orphan Annie, Dick Tracy, L'il Abner, Barnaby, Pogo and many more fill this collection of American comic classics.


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A collection of the most critically acclaimed American comic strips, from Yellow Kid of 1896 to such admired contemporary works as Peanuts, B.C. and Doonesbury. Old favourites Katzenjammer Kids, Mutt and Jeff, Gasoline Alley, Bringing up Father, Mickey Mouse, Little Orphan Annie, Dick Tracy, L'il Abner, Barnaby, Pogo and many more fill this collection of American comic cla A collection of the most critically acclaimed American comic strips, from Yellow Kid of 1896 to such admired contemporary works as Peanuts, B.C. and Doonesbury. Old favourites Katzenjammer Kids, Mutt and Jeff, Gasoline Alley, Bringing up Father, Mickey Mouse, Little Orphan Annie, Dick Tracy, L'il Abner, Barnaby, Pogo and many more fill this collection of American comic classics.

30 review for The Smithsonian Collection of Newspaper Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    This coffee table book has samples from lots of newspaper strips from 1900 to 1977, starting with the Katzenjammer Kids and ending with less innovative stuff like Hagar the Horrible and Hi & Lois. It's a fun read but not something you'd read from cover to cover. I've been sampling bits and pieces of it over the past couple days. My main takeaways are that I like the art style in the Mickey Mouse newspaper strip and that I want to read a lot more Alley Oop and Polly & her Pals comics. This coffee table book has samples from lots of newspaper strips from 1900 to 1977, starting with the Katzenjammer Kids and ending with less innovative stuff like Hagar the Horrible and Hi & Lois. It's a fun read but not something you'd read from cover to cover. I've been sampling bits and pieces of it over the past couple days. My main takeaways are that I like the art style in the Mickey Mouse newspaper strip and that I want to read a lot more Alley Oop and Polly & her Pals comics.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alec Longstreth

    When I was just starting out as a cartoonist I bought a copy of this book at the urging of my new cartoonist friends. Every time I opened it though, I had a hard time getting into the material. At the time, I saw this as "old comics" and I was only interested in "graphic novels." I got rid of the book in one of my many moves. I was a fool. Last year I came across this book in a local used book store and decided to give it another shot. I'm glad I did. It gave me a much deeper understanding of th When I was just starting out as a cartoonist I bought a copy of this book at the urging of my new cartoonist friends. Every time I opened it though, I had a hard time getting into the material. At the time, I saw this as "old comics" and I was only interested in "graphic novels." I got rid of the book in one of my many moves. I was a fool. Last year I came across this book in a local used book store and decided to give it another shot. I'm glad I did. It gave me a much deeper understanding of the history of comics in America and made me feel like I am making contributions to the legacy of a great storytelling medium and art form. i.e. "Standing on the shoulders of giants." It turns out many of these "old comics" are much better than most of the "graphic novels" I've read. Highly recommended for any cartoonist.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Goatllama

    I first came across this in third grade. It was probably the first book that I ever wanted to steal. Aside from some disjointed storylines of which I really wanted to read more (a younger me would probably say “I don’t care if it’s a ‘collection,’ give me the whole darn thing!”), this is an astoundingly fun assortment of large, high-quality scans. I never knew that Mickey Mouse and Popeye could have so much depth to their storylines ‘til I opened this tome (the laugh of the Sea Hag!... ANK ANK A I first came across this in third grade. It was probably the first book that I ever wanted to steal. Aside from some disjointed storylines of which I really wanted to read more (a younger me would probably say “I don’t care if it’s a ‘collection,’ give me the whole darn thing!”), this is an astoundingly fun assortment of large, high-quality scans. I never knew that Mickey Mouse and Popeye could have so much depth to their storylines ‘til I opened this tome (the laugh of the Sea Hag!... ANK ANK ANK). And don’t even get me started on Little Nemo… I was constantly drawing before I read this, but afterward I know for a fact that I tried to emulate the masterwork of these old cartoonists as best I could. A random line that has stuck with me: “OH all you Hollanders! Watch out for SLIM JIM!!,” which is followed by a glorious, chaotic, full page involving a windmill and the aforementioned Slim Jim. Really, need I say more?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Csaba Rusznyák

    This is a wonderful collection of american newspaper comics from (mostly) the first half of the 20th century. I am not saying I loved all of the comics presented here, maybe not even most of the comics, but I am still giving the collection a five star rating because it provides the reader with a very enlightening, interesting and informative window to the evolution of the comic strip through many-many groundbreaking or even revolutionary examples in the widest variety of genres and styles. For s This is a wonderful collection of american newspaper comics from (mostly) the first half of the 20th century. I am not saying I loved all of the comics presented here, maybe not even most of the comics, but I am still giving the collection a five star rating because it provides the reader with a very enlightening, interesting and informative window to the evolution of the comic strip through many-many groundbreaking or even revolutionary examples in the widest variety of genres and styles. For somene like me, who only knew the most famous comics from this period (like Little Nemo, Flash Gordon or Peanuts) this book is a treasure trove and I will look up some volumes of the more intresting strips that I learned about and enjoyed in this collection (like Gasoline Alley, Polly and Her Pals or Wash Tubbs/Captain Easy).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    This book is a massive sampling of newspaper comics from The Yellow Kid to modern days (well, about 1977 anyway). The large pages allow for great classics like Little Nemo in Slumberland to be printed almost as big as they were originally. Comics like Nemo were so rich in fine details that are hard to appreciate or discern when printed in 8 1/2" x 11" format. I used to pore over this book quite a bit as a kid. It gave me an appreciation for E. C. Segar's early Popeye comics from the Thimble Theat This book is a massive sampling of newspaper comics from The Yellow Kid to modern days (well, about 1977 anyway). The large pages allow for great classics like Little Nemo in Slumberland to be printed almost as big as they were originally. Comics like Nemo were so rich in fine details that are hard to appreciate or discern when printed in 8 1/2" x 11" format. I used to pore over this book quite a bit as a kid. It gave me an appreciation for E. C. Segar's early Popeye comics from the Thimble Theater days. In comparison to these tales, the cartoons made in the 1960's were trite and poorly drawn. The early Fleischer cartoons, however, kept Segar's wit and art quality intact (and sometimes used revolutionary animation techniques, such as in Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba's Forty Thieves). It was also with this book that I discovered George Herriman's surreal Krazy Kat. Krazy, the Kat, is caught in the middle of a bizarre love triangle between Ignatz, the mouse who terrorizes Krazy by throwing bricks at her, and Offissa Pupp, the police dog who feels the need to protect Krazy and arrest Ignatz. However, Krazy loves to get hit in the head with a brick by Ignatz, seeing the abusive attention as a sign of affection. Now, take this conflict, set it in the strange landscape of Coconino County, sprinkle in some other minor characters, add some long-running storylines that go beyond the main conflict, and you have a great comic strip. Sadly, this book was destroyed one day when my dog decided to eat it. It seems that he found the glue in the binding to be a tasty treat and he devoured a good chunk of it. Fortunately, a good friend of mine gave me his copy of the book as a gift when he was moving so it is now back in my library.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steve Pifer

    Believe it or not, I picked this volume up for a measly dollar at the local library's annual sale. Some massive brain therein apparently goes thru their volumes and decides what they no long need, want, or feel is essential any more. Most probably, their way to decide which is to stay and which is to go is by the number of checkouts in the past few years. Well, what can I say. This is the publics loss and my gain. A wonderful historical collection of newspaper comics, many of which even this old Believe it or not, I picked this volume up for a measly dollar at the local library's annual sale. Some massive brain therein apparently goes thru their volumes and decides what they no long need, want, or feel is essential any more. Most probably, their way to decide which is to stay and which is to go is by the number of checkouts in the past few years. Well, what can I say. This is the publics loss and my gain. A wonderful historical collection of newspaper comics, many of which even this old man doesn't remember. All comics are discussed, including their context and how they related to the world at their time. Some are obviously quite politically incorrect, but an accurate history will necessarily include much of what makes most folks blush and gulp today. I don't really believe that we are all that sensitive, but for the sake of fitting in, most of us will continue to pretend so. So when did we begin to depend on cartoons to be honest, revealing, and relaying truth to the masses? Well, probably right from the very beginning! This book is an essential. No question.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael P.

    A superb sampling of newspaper comic strips from the start thru the next several decades, only slightly flawed (because there isn't much of it) by Blackbeard's overwritten narrative. If there is another flaw it is that it leaves you wanting more, but you forgive this thick book for not being even thicker. A superb sampling of newspaper comic strips from the start thru the next several decades, only slightly flawed (because there isn't much of it) by Blackbeard's overwritten narrative. If there is another flaw it is that it leaves you wanting more, but you forgive this thick book for not being even thicker.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Did you know Dashall Hammett scripted "Agent X-9". Well I didn't. This is a great general history in a large format. The first appereance of Superman and The Batman? It's all here. Plus Terry and the Pirates and my all-time favourite comic strip. Krazy Kat. Did you know Dashall Hammett scripted "Agent X-9". Well I didn't. This is a great general history in a large format. The first appereance of Superman and The Batman? It's all here. Plus Terry and the Pirates and my all-time favourite comic strip. Krazy Kat.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jerome

    There is no better overview of older newspaper comics out there. Phenomenal collection worth rereading many times.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Fishsanwitt

    stamped

  11. 4 out of 5

    Troy

    This is the finest collection of comics ever printed. This is one of my all time favorite books - an endless collection of treasures.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Fantastic collection of newspaper comics, in a size that does justice to the old full page Sunday strips. Has a classic full Segar Popeye sequence as well as many other fantastic strips.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Arpad Okay

    this is the best collection of old time comics i've ever seen. beautiful color sundays and whole plot lines of weeklies. perfect. huge. this is the best collection of old time comics i've ever seen. beautiful color sundays and whole plot lines of weeklies. perfect. huge.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Arthur

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Irwin

  17. 4 out of 5

    T Campbell

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alexander

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dunkindean

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tim Jennen

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charles Forsman

  22. 5 out of 5

    Timothy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Pierre

  24. 5 out of 5

    Scott Gilbert

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ian Vance

  28. 5 out of 5

    Blair

  29. 5 out of 5

    David Alex

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matthew White

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