Hot Best Seller

Beyond Talent: Creating a Successful Career in Music

Availability: Ready to download

This second edition of Beyond Talent provides user-friendly real-life advice, examples, and perspectives on how to further a career in music. Understanding the unique talents and training of musicians, veteran music career counselor Angela Myles Beeching presents a wealth of creative solutions for career advancement in the highly competitive music industry. Step-by-step in This second edition of Beyond Talent provides user-friendly real-life advice, examples, and perspectives on how to further a career in music. Understanding the unique talents and training of musicians, veteran music career counselor Angela Myles Beeching presents a wealth of creative solutions for career advancement in the highly competitive music industry. Step-by-step instructions detail how to design promotional materials, book performances, network and access resources and assistance, jump start a stalled career, and expand your employment opportunities while remaining true to your music. Beeching untangles artist management and the recording industry, explains how to find and create performance opportunities, and provides guidance on grant writing and fundraising, day jobs, freelancing, and how to manage money, time, and stress. The companion website puts numerous up-to-date and useful internet resources at your fingertips. This essential handbook goes beyond the usual how-to, helping musicians tackle the core questions about career goals, and create a meaningful life as a professional musician. Beyond Talent is the ideal companion for students and professionals, emerging musicians and mid-career artists.


Compare

This second edition of Beyond Talent provides user-friendly real-life advice, examples, and perspectives on how to further a career in music. Understanding the unique talents and training of musicians, veteran music career counselor Angela Myles Beeching presents a wealth of creative solutions for career advancement in the highly competitive music industry. Step-by-step in This second edition of Beyond Talent provides user-friendly real-life advice, examples, and perspectives on how to further a career in music. Understanding the unique talents and training of musicians, veteran music career counselor Angela Myles Beeching presents a wealth of creative solutions for career advancement in the highly competitive music industry. Step-by-step instructions detail how to design promotional materials, book performances, network and access resources and assistance, jump start a stalled career, and expand your employment opportunities while remaining true to your music. Beeching untangles artist management and the recording industry, explains how to find and create performance opportunities, and provides guidance on grant writing and fundraising, day jobs, freelancing, and how to manage money, time, and stress. The companion website puts numerous up-to-date and useful internet resources at your fingertips. This essential handbook goes beyond the usual how-to, helping musicians tackle the core questions about career goals, and create a meaningful life as a professional musician. Beyond Talent is the ideal companion for students and professionals, emerging musicians and mid-career artists.

30 review for Beyond Talent: Creating a Successful Career in Music

  1. 4 out of 5

    Devin

    Great, in-depth look (do's and don'ts) at creating a bio, navigating professional photography, and much more. As I got further in the book, I realized it was geared more towards performers, which made its relevancy slightly less for me, but there were still some practical advice for musicians who don't plan to be full time performing artists. Notes: Musicians today are no longer content to perform only in traditional, formal venues, disconnected from audiences and from communities. Musicians toda Great, in-depth look (do's and don'ts) at creating a bio, navigating professional photography, and much more. As I got further in the book, I realized it was geared more towards performers, which made its relevancy slightly less for me, but there were still some practical advice for musicians who don't plan to be full time performing artists. Notes: Musicians today are no longer content to perform only in traditional, formal venues, disconnected from audiences and from communities. Musicians today explore ways to find a sense of immediacy, connection, and relevance. Careers are developed over years, not hatched overnight (4). Tip: Ask professional musicians about their work lives. You will find there are very few who make a living solely from performing (5). In the protective bubble of a music degree program, students can be oblivious to the difficult realities of the "Real world." Unfortunately, the bubble also keeps musicians uninformed about the many other nontraditional and entrepreneurial music career success paths (6). With a narrow vie of success, musicians unconsciously limit their careers, their satisfaction, and their professional fulfillment. Highly competitive traditional jobs are only a fraction of the work actually available to musicians (7). The U.S. music industry employs roughly 295,000 people in the core music industries, which music include performers, ensembles, those working for publishers and record labels, and those doing studio and radio work, music instrument manufacturing, and retail. Another 899,000 people are employed in the peripheral music industries: those at music schools and recording reproduction companies, and those working as agents, promoters, and venue managers. The total annual revenue for the music industry includes $3.1 billion from the core industries, and another $23.5 billion from the peripheral ones. Communicate what makes you distinctive. In order to get book bookings, media attention, and an audience, you will need to be able to communicate what is special about you and your music making. What is your singular viewpoint? Do you perform any specialized or unusual repertoire? (12) Remind yourself why you got involved in music in the first place. Your most basic reasons for being in music are crucial factors to keep you moving forward in your career. Keeping tabs on your motivation-on the essence of what music means to you-should help sustain you throughout your career (13). Most music careers are project-driven (16). *"Goals are dreams with deadlines." "If you only interact with people in your network when you want something (a job, leads for your business, help getting out a jam) you will destroy it faster than you can build it. Healthy networks are made up of people who truly like and respect each other and help each other willingly without expecting anything in return."- Pamela Slim (22) The way you approach someone new (your words and actions, and the agenda behind these) will determine the outcome of your networking efforts. Don't be a taker-the kind of person who is thinking only of his or her own interests, needs, and ambitions. Be a giver-the kind of person attuned to the interests of others and who demonstrates a kindness of spirit and genuine personal concern for others. Your network should include people who inspire and challenge you, not just artistically, but as a citizen and a member of a community (23). *Networking is not about being extroverted. You simply need to be interested in other people, able to talk one-on-one, and willing to say a bit about yourself and either your project or an upcoming performance (29). If you're approaching a busy professional and asking for some of their time and expertise, you need to come across as interested, respectful, and professional (32). An elevator speech is not something formal or memorized (33). Instead, it should be a set of phrases and content you can use flexibly and comfortably to introduce yourself to others. If you have an elevator speech at the ready, it makes it much easier to meet people. It should be short: about 30 seconds and no more than four sentences. It should be conversational and personal, not a sales pitch. Your own voicemail message should sound professional. Some performance contractors won't leave messages offering work unless the recorded greeting appropriately identifies the musician (35). When attending a social function, use conversation openers: Ask open-ended questions, such as "What do you think about the...[performance, speech, workshop]?"as opposed to yes or no questions. Ask questions that show your interest in the other person's perspective (39.) Exchange business cards when you have reason to. Write yourself a note on the back of the card reminding you where you met the persona and what your intended follow-up action will be (40). "Promotional materials tell the story of who you are and what your music is about" (45) Handling publicity is part of a musician's job. You are the best person to tell your story (46). Branding is about clarifying your identity, mission, and reputation. Branding, and promotional efforts that stem from it, is about articulating your true self, not putting up a false front. Think through your past, both musical and nonmusical. Sort through remembered anecdotes, old photos, and concert programs to help get a sense of what you'd like to communicate about yourself. Think about what you have done as a musician, what you intend to do, what you value, and what you have to offer. An essential promotional piece is a musician's professional toolkit is the bio. A bio is NOT a biography. It is not a chronicle of your life history. Rather, a musician's bio is a marketing piece consisting of background information written in paragraph form, conveying what is distinctive and compelling about you and your music (49). Most musicians have several versions of their bio, each tailored for a different situation (50). Start by making a list of potential items for your bio. List: Interesting musical projects, what you're especially interested in or focusing on lately, including upcoming plans; Interesting non musical hobbies and interests, such as causes or community efforts with which you've been involved; Unusual biographical anecdotes, such as how or why you chose your instrument, or any dramatic or unusual story about your training and decision to become a musician (52-53). Choose an opener for your bio (54). Your lead mau bea quote, a single item, a group of impressive-sounding awards, or a group of performances at interesting venues. Whatever you choose, your opener should not be about your earliest musical experiences, because your bio should NOT be in chronological order. Group similar items together by topic, but don't group items by either year or location, because you do not want to write a chronological bio (55). One topic per paragraph. Back up all general statements with specific examples. Concrete examples assure tham that you are indeed every bit as accomplished as your bio indicates (56). -Write your bio in the third person: use she/he, and Ms./Mr. (not "I"). -There is no need to include the date of every award, performance, scholarship or degree. When things happen is nowhere near as important as what happened. -Don't start with your educational credentials-save this for the end of the bio -Don't use cliches such as "unique." Besides being a cliche, it's redundant: each of us is, by definition, an individual, so don't state the obvious. Avoid phrases such as "critically acclaimed," "rising star," "quickly establishing herself" and "has had the privilege of studying under". They sound mechanical. -Don't try to dress up your bio with fancy words. "In the end, it's the concrete facts of the story itself that make an impression, not the adjectives." (57) What you should aim for in a publicity photo is an image of what you look like (on a good day) and a real sense of your personality- the version of yourself revealed through your music (68). Your photographer should take a minimum of 100 shots. The more pictures your photography takes, the more options you will have. Check on how many shots are included in the fee. Ask about retouching and the cost of a finished master shot. With most photographers, you are paying for the creation of the phots (Skills and expertise), an agreed amount of time for the shoot and delivery of the final product, a print or scan of select images, the reproduction rights for use of the images, plus all expenses involved, such as post-production digital work and processing. According to U.S. copyright law, it's the photographer-not you-who owns the negatives. So make sure you know exactly what you are paying for and what you should get in return (71). Bring references shots; photos of yourself that you either love or hate. Be ready to explain why. If your photographer knows what you want, you will have a much better chance of being satisfied with the results (72). Show samples of other musicians' promo shots you like for the mood, composition, or lighting. Make a list of adjectives describing what traits you want to your photo to convey (serious, self-assured, creative, introspective, etc). Be specific about how you want to come across. The New York Times reports that in the early 1960s, classical music still accounted for 33% of all record citation of American, classical and jazz record sales ach account for about 3% of all sales (87). To record a copyrighted work, you need to obtain a mechanical license from the copyright holder, usually the publisher or composer. You do not need a mechanical license if the copyright on the work has expired. Works published in U.S. before 1923 are considered in the public domain and can be freely recorded, adapted, sampled, or arranged (92-93). Google yourself (123). The big idea behind all of the social networking platforms is that people want to make real connections with real people. It's about dialogue, not about spamming people with marketing messages (126). Your website should be an extension of you and your artistic vision (128). It should effectively convey your personality. Everything on your site should be carefully chosen to represent you and your music: from the choice of typeface, colors, and graphics to the text, sound clips, photos, and video. Once your site is up and running,you can use Google Analytics to get free site traffic analysis (133). -Fit the most important information onto your home page on one screen. Don't overlook your visitors. Keep it simple! Avoid flash and animation can take too long to load. -Use"white space," and avoid cutter-make your site pages easy on the eyes -*Put the most important info or image in the upper left of each page. Studies show that this is where visitors start, so put your name, instrument, or essential image there. -Think of having a "Call to action" on each page, a goal for something you want the visitor to do. This might be to sign up for your newsletter, listen to a sound clip, or purchase a track, or some merchandise (134). Blogs are for storytelling: when effective, they draw the reader into the writer's world and perspective (135). If you teach, you may want to have a portion of your website devoted to your teaching (138). Include teaching philosophy statement, his teaching credentials, a short bio about his teaching experience, and his studio policy (139). Ask yourself: What do you want visitors to do on your site? *After the terrorist attacks of September 11,2001, the sheer number of memorial concerts showed how important music is in helping people express and process powerful emotions. For the first anniversary of the attacks, the "Rolling Requiem" project presented worldwide, continuous performances of the Mozart Requiem. Music creates community (148). Are you practicing and performing with a sense of authenticity and commitment, or working as if you had a musical factory job? We communicate when we perform. Have you considered that everything has a meaning, including your presence on the stage? (150). No music competition guarantees a career, and there are many musicians who win prestigious competitions these days and do not get artist management (158). Part of being a successful musician is being aware of current ideas and opportunities. If you're not reading about who is performing what and where, you're missing out on program ideas you can borrow, potential collaborations with colleagues, possible bookings, and more. Find out where your local arts scene is covered. Check out the local daily and weekly newspapers, radio programs, webzines, online calendars, and the blogs that cover your music genre (184). The next day after a concert, send thank-you notes to everyone who assisted you in the performance-this is a good way to help the presenter and other supporters to think positively of you and to want to work with you again (200). Outreach can have negative connotations. It can imply a one-way elitist transaction, a kind of cultural imperialism,, whereas community engagement connotes collaboration and participation (202). Teaching artists work is a wide range of settings, from primary and secondary schools to hospitals, prisons, shelters, community centers, retirement homes, and museums (203). Due to a lack of music education in the schools, the competing demands for audience leisure time, and the hunger in our cultures for meaningful social connection, teaching artist kills, have become essential for today's musicians, and for the future of music. There is far more demand for effective residency work than there is for formal concerts (205). This is because there is simply more grant funding available for arts education presentations than for traditional concerts. *Many non-musicians experience music as aural wallpaper, the backdrop of their daily life, creating ambiance for commuting, shopping, dining, and at work. The fundamental listenig skills musicians take for granted, such as hearing melody distinct from accompaniment, and distinguishing instrumental timbres, changes in tone color, tonalities, tempo, and contrasting themes-these are all skills people need to learn. Audiences need to practice listening in a new way in order to catch these distinctions. We often ask audiences to pay attention without giving them ay clue as to how or for what to listen for specifically. Residency work is often about going to the audience, meeting them on their turf and performing in nontraditional spaces, like school gums, retirement homes, or office complexes (206). For most presenters, the primary goal of residency work is to bring music to those who would not otherwise attend main stage concerts. But the idea of residency work is to do more than simply expose people to great music. It's focused on education: helping audiences learn about the instruments, the musicians, music, and each other. "For many the formality of traditional Western classical concert can be a real turnoff. The audience is asked to sit quietly in rows, at a distance from the performers,without making noise or speaking until intermission, and God forbid anyone should applaud at the wrong time! All of this creates a barrier between audience and artist. So, in recent years, presenters and musicians have been rethinking the how, where, when, and why they give concerts. Think about how you want to come across to your audience: what you want to convey about who you are and what your music is about (226). The purpose of an entrance bow is to greet your audience and to acknowledge their applause. A bow is the equivalent of a handshake a greeting when you meet someone new. When you walk out from backstage, walk straight to your performance position, with your head and chin up. Then, turn to the audience and make eye contact, not fixing on any one individual, but catching eyes as you let your eyes sweep over the crowd, and smile. The eye contact conveys your sincerity. And what you think about translates to your facial expression and body language. Focus on positive self-talk. Thinking "I'm so happy to see you here!" may help to put you and your audience at ease. "Look down as you bow; this is a sign of humility." (227-228) Perfectionism is a trap (235). Flawlessness should not be the primary goal in performances. "Focus on what you want to convey, over and above technical qualities of your performance, and trust your preparation to keep your errors to a minimum" -Jeff Nelsen The foundation of performance anxiety is fear of public humiliation (236). "Sell your story, not yourself...make them a audience that loves what you love"-Jeff Nelsen. Don't project your fear and negative thoughts onto your audience-they are on your side. Studies have shown that as many a 82% of musicians have performance injuries. Of instrumentalists, the most frequent performance injuries reported are among pianists, violinists, cellists, and guitarists, but every musician is at risk (247). "Avoid playing more than twenty-five minutes without a give minute break." (249). Violinists and violists should adjust their supports so that the instrument can be held without any elevation of the left shoulder. People booking music for wedding often need a lot of help in understand what they want. Some clients know what they want but can't describe it. The musician's job includes helping clients feel confident about their choices(258). Establish an hourly rate per musician to quote to clients (267). "The most important thing is not the schedule itself, but clarity of intentions. What do you want to accomplish and how are you going to do it-clear intentions are needed for both (275). Americans total federal and state taxes amount to roughly a third of their income (287). Every April 15, federal and state taxes are due on income earned during the previous calendar year (January 1-December 31)(288). You are obligated to file a tax return if you made at least $400 after expenses as a self-employed individual; you need to declare the income from all your gigs and teaching, whether or not you received a 1099, because the employer may have notified the IRS even if you did not receive the copy; the IRS may audit you up to three years after the fact-and charge you three years' interest and penalties in addition to the taxes owed- so make sure there are no mistakes on your tax return (289). *How much you pay in taxes for your freelance income has everything to do with the records you keep. Here's how it works; the IRS considers freelance work to be self-employment, and you (as a musician) are an independent contractor or small-business owner. The IRS recognizes that self-employed individuals must invest in their businesses, that they need to spend money in order to make money. Consequently, the IRS allows musicians to deduct necessary business expenses form their reported income and pay taxes only on the remaining amount. This includes all music career-related expenditures, such as music equipment, scores, recordings, and the cost of traveling to gigs and auditions. However you can't take these tax-deductible expenses unless you keep records and receipts, and fill out the correct tax forms. You can deduct these business expenses from your taxes only if you use the 1040 (long form) with Schedule C for self-employed workers. Save credit card records, but know that they don't suffice for receipts because they do not detail what specifically was purchased (292). Fundraising work is all about connecting people and building relationships. It's helping people put their interests and values into action for a cause they care about (304). In kind donations- non-cash contributions (ex.piano) Write handwritten thank you notes (311)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This book helped me feel like I finally had someone in my corner like a really great mentor cheering me on.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Felicity

    This book was recommended to me by my tutor. Wow! Boy do I wish I had read this book a few years ago. Angela Beeching tells you everything you need to know about having a successful and sustaining music career and covers every topic including: budgeting, networking, websites, funding applications etc. It is also bang up to date in a new 3rd edition and the only stuff that wasn't useful to me was information about how certain systems work in America. I will certainly read this book again and apply This book was recommended to me by my tutor. Wow! Boy do I wish I had read this book a few years ago. Angela Beeching tells you everything you need to know about having a successful and sustaining music career and covers every topic including: budgeting, networking, websites, funding applications etc. It is also bang up to date in a new 3rd edition and the only stuff that wasn't useful to me was information about how certain systems work in America. I will certainly read this book again and apply more of Beeching's ideas when we aren't in a pandemic but in the meantime I will be using it to help me build a website. Every musician or aspiring musician should read this book. It teaches you all the useful stuff they didn't teach you at college!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    A must-read for anyone selling a career in music!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    A lot of really important and helpful information in this book for any musician looking to start or expand their careers.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    One of my professors was using this book as one of her textbooks for a practicum class that I wasn't required to take. However, she highly recommended the book, so I got it as a gift for Christmas and read it over the rest of Christmas break. I was able to employ many of the ideas suggested in the book in several different areas. The publicity ideas were especially useful in the marketing of the quartet that I am managing. I would highly recommend it to the musician who is looking to start his o One of my professors was using this book as one of her textbooks for a practicum class that I wasn't required to take. However, she highly recommended the book, so I got it as a gift for Christmas and read it over the rest of Christmas break. I was able to employ many of the ideas suggested in the book in several different areas. The publicity ideas were especially useful in the marketing of the quartet that I am managing. I would highly recommend it to the musician who is looking to start his or her own business or perhaps just get some new ideas to refresh what they are currently doing.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Snufkin

    A brilliant and insightful read, useful for all budding musicians out there! Lots of wise words, great advice, logical reasonings, and fresh thinking. Seeing each aspect of music-making from all different angles, it gives plenty of food for thought. UK readers: some parts don't apply for us, but that's the only negative I have to say! A brilliant and insightful read, useful for all budding musicians out there! Lots of wise words, great advice, logical reasonings, and fresh thinking. Seeing each aspect of music-making from all different angles, it gives plenty of food for thought. UK readers: some parts don't apply for us, but that's the only negative I have to say!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Ohlenkamp

    This is one of only about 4 MUST READ books for young or old thinking a career in music. It will get the light bulb flashing about considerations never made.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Eric Jensen

    This is a great book for anyone pursuing a career in music, particularly performers. Great examples of entrepreneurial thinking throughout. Highly recommended.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Interested in a music career? Must read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kristy Morrell

  12. 4 out of 5

    Robyn Bos

  13. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Campbell

  14. 5 out of 5

    Britt

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charley

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pantelis

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kalyn

  19. 5 out of 5

    Emily Dunbar

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aissa Maese

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sara Truelove

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mehrdad Gholami

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hadiya

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sami Froncek

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Lewis

  28. 5 out of 5

    Viola Le Compte

  29. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Perry

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ann Rittenberg

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...