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Marlowe, Shakespeare: The Harvard Classics Deluxe Edition

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1910. Contents: Edward the Second by Christopher Marlowe. The Tragedy of Hamlet prince of Denmark; The Tragedy of King Lear; The Tragedy of Macbeth; The Tempest by William Shakespeare.


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1910. Contents: Edward the Second by Christopher Marlowe. The Tragedy of Hamlet prince of Denmark; The Tragedy of King Lear; The Tragedy of Macbeth; The Tempest by William Shakespeare.

30 review for Marlowe, Shakespeare: The Harvard Classics Deluxe Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    julié.

    WE ARE NEVER EVER EVER GETTING BACK TOGETHER

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nullifidian

    To respond to the comment below, it is true that there aren't many or very detailed notes in this edition, but this is fairly typical of the time. There was only once when I felt this was a serious disadvantage: in Act II, scene 1 of The Tempest, when Antonio and Sebastian were doing their Statler-and-Waldorf-esque commentary on the speeches of Gonzalo and Adrian. There were a lot of puns and wordplay that could potentially be misconstrued or not understood. I'll also concede that on one occasio To respond to the comment below, it is true that there aren't many or very detailed notes in this edition, but this is fairly typical of the time. There was only once when I felt this was a serious disadvantage: in Act II, scene 1 of The Tempest, when Antonio and Sebastian were doing their Statler-and-Waldorf-esque commentary on the speeches of Gonzalo and Adrian. There were a lot of puns and wordplay that could potentially be misconstrued or not understood. I'll also concede that on one occasion a note was extremely inane: when Hamlet described the pirates as dealing with him like "thieves of mercy", the note helpfully explained that Hamlet meant they were "merciful thieves". However, on the whole, this is a perfectly adequate edition for understanding the words of Shakespeare (and Marlowe), and if you feel like there aren't enough notes then there are more fully annotated editions available. I'd recommend The RSC Shakespeare: The Complete Works or the Folger Shakespeare or Arden Shakespeare individual editions of the plays (the latter being the most detailed in terms of the number and length of their annotations and the depth of the scholarly apparatus). Still, this work is in the public domain and a free resource isn't to be despised, regardless of what more recent editions are like.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Warren Hall

    The editing for this edition is not the best. For example, on the righthand side of the page, one comes upon the word [ Aside ], but often this fails to denote just what it is meant to be added to--thus forcing the reader to use context-clues to figure out just what was said to others and what was said to oneself. Some of the notes are also superfluous, but--because these texts are from so long ago--sometimes it is best to be rather on the safer side than otherwise, so I don't really have a prob The editing for this edition is not the best. For example, on the righthand side of the page, one comes upon the word [ Aside ], but often this fails to denote just what it is meant to be added to--thus forcing the reader to use context-clues to figure out just what was said to others and what was said to oneself. Some of the notes are also superfluous, but--because these texts are from so long ago--sometimes it is best to be rather on the safer side than otherwise, so I don't really have a problem with them; if anything, more might be in order. In the first play contained herein (Edward II), for example, one character uses a previously common phrase "marry" to express agreement, something not (often) used now. I don't feel the need to review the plays individually here; this review is solely for what they are published into.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mario

    This is only a review of the physical book, not of the individual plays, which were as good as ever. The collection, though, and this might only be my edition, was disorganized and unnecessarily difficult to read. The character names were always abbreviated (Seb, Mir, Y. Mor, etc.) presumably to save space, which is a step I haven't seen other editions find necessary. There were footnotes, but they didn't add much; if you are going to distract from the text you should do a little more than defin This is only a review of the physical book, not of the individual plays, which were as good as ever. The collection, though, and this might only be my edition, was disorganized and unnecessarily difficult to read. The character names were always abbreviated (Seb, Mir, Y. Mor, etc.) presumably to save space, which is a step I haven't seen other editions find necessary. There were footnotes, but they didn't add much; if you are going to distract from the text you should do a little more than define an archaic word or phrase. I guess it looks nice on a shelf, but I wouldn't recommend buying something like this unless I didn't plan to read it. You get a lot more from one of the cheap paperback versions.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tiago Kreusch

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jacy

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alec

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  11. 5 out of 5

    Fred Kiesche

  12. 4 out of 5

    John W. Dennehy

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  14. 5 out of 5

    A. J

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eddie

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amber

  17. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Chung

  18. 4 out of 5

    D Freeman

  19. 5 out of 5

    James

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Wayne

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michael Jepson

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kari Windham

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dave Walston

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Cotter

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mason McMillan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mwmosley

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Thomas

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jason Ormandy

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bertram Hoddinott

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