Hot Best Seller

Feel-Bad Education: And Other Contrarian Essays on Children and Schooling

Availability: Ready to download

Mind-opening writing on what kids need from school, from one of education’s most outspoken voices   Arguing that our schools are currently in the grip of a “cult of rigor”—a confusion of harder with better that threatens to banish both joy and meaningful intellectual inquiry from our classrooms—Alfie Kohn issues a stirring call to rethink our priorities and reconsider our Mind-opening writing on what kids need from school, from one of education’s most outspoken voices   Arguing that our schools are currently in the grip of a “cult of rigor”—a confusion of harder with better that threatens to banish both joy and meaningful intellectual inquiry from our classrooms—Alfie Kohn issues a stirring call to rethink our priorities and reconsider our practices.   Kohn’s latest wide-ranging collection of writings will add to his reputation as one of the most incisive thinkers in the field, who questions the assumptions too often taken for granted in discussions about education and human behavior.   In nineteen recently published essays—and in a substantive introduction, new for this volume—Kohn repeatedly invites us to think more deeply about the conventional wisdom. Is self-discipline always desirable? he asks, citing surprising evidence to the contrary. Does academic cheating necessarily indicate a moral failing? Might inspirational posters commonly found on school walls (“Reach for the stars!”) reflect disturbing assumptions about children? Could the use of rubrics for evaluating student learning prove counterproductive?   Subjecting young children to homework, grades, or standardized tests—merely because these things will be required of them later—reminds Kohn of Monty Python’s “getting hit on the head lessons.” And, with tongue firmly in cheek, he declares that we should immediately begin teaching twenty-second-century skills.   Whether Kohn is clearing up misconceptions about progressive education or explaining why incentives for healthier living are bound to backfire, debunking the idea that education reform should be driven by concerns about economic competitiveness or putting “Supernanny” in her place, his readers will understand why the Washington Post has said that “teachers and parents who encounter Kohn and his thoughts come away transfixed, ready to change their schools.”


Compare

Mind-opening writing on what kids need from school, from one of education’s most outspoken voices   Arguing that our schools are currently in the grip of a “cult of rigor”—a confusion of harder with better that threatens to banish both joy and meaningful intellectual inquiry from our classrooms—Alfie Kohn issues a stirring call to rethink our priorities and reconsider our Mind-opening writing on what kids need from school, from one of education’s most outspoken voices   Arguing that our schools are currently in the grip of a “cult of rigor”—a confusion of harder with better that threatens to banish both joy and meaningful intellectual inquiry from our classrooms—Alfie Kohn issues a stirring call to rethink our priorities and reconsider our practices.   Kohn’s latest wide-ranging collection of writings will add to his reputation as one of the most incisive thinkers in the field, who questions the assumptions too often taken for granted in discussions about education and human behavior.   In nineteen recently published essays—and in a substantive introduction, new for this volume—Kohn repeatedly invites us to think more deeply about the conventional wisdom. Is self-discipline always desirable? he asks, citing surprising evidence to the contrary. Does academic cheating necessarily indicate a moral failing? Might inspirational posters commonly found on school walls (“Reach for the stars!”) reflect disturbing assumptions about children? Could the use of rubrics for evaluating student learning prove counterproductive?   Subjecting young children to homework, grades, or standardized tests—merely because these things will be required of them later—reminds Kohn of Monty Python’s “getting hit on the head lessons.” And, with tongue firmly in cheek, he declares that we should immediately begin teaching twenty-second-century skills.   Whether Kohn is clearing up misconceptions about progressive education or explaining why incentives for healthier living are bound to backfire, debunking the idea that education reform should be driven by concerns about economic competitiveness or putting “Supernanny” in her place, his readers will understand why the Washington Post has said that “teachers and parents who encounter Kohn and his thoughts come away transfixed, ready to change their schools.”

30 review for Feel-Bad Education: And Other Contrarian Essays on Children and Schooling

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gary Anderson

    Alfie Kohn has made sense to me for more than a decade, ever since a colleague recommended Kohn’s book Punished by Rewards and enthusiastically implemented a no-grade policy in his class that caused quite a brouhaha. In the intervening years, our nation’s education policies and discussions have viscously congealed around an accountability culture that diminishes the ability of students, teachers, and communities to nurture authentic learning and learners. Feel-Bad Education, a new collection of Alfie Kohn has made sense to me for more than a decade, ever since a colleague recommended Kohn’s book Punished by Rewards and enthusiastically implemented a no-grade policy in his class that caused quite a brouhaha. In the intervening years, our nation’s education policies and discussions have viscously congealed around an accountability culture that diminishes the ability of students, teachers, and communities to nurture authentic learning and learners. Feel-Bad Education, a new collection of Kohn’s articles published over the past several years, is a welcome addition to current debates about the state of American education. Educators and parents concerned about the direction of education in our nation should read at least some of the pieces in Feel-Bad Education. Kohn engagingly articulates ideas about reading, writing, cheating, testing, grading, teaching, learning, and parenting. He deservedly skewers those in the education community who advocate standardized testing as a meaningful way to do anything productive. Also in Kohn’s sights are homework, grades, “rigor,” and the national core standards movement. My only two quibbles with Feel-Bad Education are relatively minor. Although I’m glad to have all of these highly relevant writings collected in one volume, some of the themes become repetitive if a reader goes through the book cover to cover. Of course, the pieces were not originally published with such a reading process in mind, so this is more a function of the book’s nature than anything else. I’m more bothered that the articles here lack pragmatic considerations. For example, I agree with Kohn that grades are detrimental to actual learning, but grades are still the coin of the realm in American high schools. What exactly can classroom teachers do in the face of that? How can we mitigate the deleterious effects of grades while we work to eliminate them (or at least undermine their impact)? I agree with Alfie Kohn on just about everything, but many teachers still work in environments that fall far short of his vision. How exactly can teachers take steps toward Kohn within the context of schools going in the opposite direction? Cross-posted on my blog at What's Not Wrong?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    I read authors for different reasons, and when I need a really radical harangue, Alfie Kohn is the man to get me going. I have heard him speak, and whenever I hear or read him, I think, "YEAH!! Oh, but that won't work!" He so lives outside the real world of teachers trying to keep their jobs in order to make a difference in kids' lives. We can't refuse to give the tests, or turn our backs on the political realities of public education, but OH DO I LOVE HIM. This is a collection of essays and arti I read authors for different reasons, and when I need a really radical harangue, Alfie Kohn is the man to get me going. I have heard him speak, and whenever I hear or read him, I think, "YEAH!! Oh, but that won't work!" He so lives outside the real world of teachers trying to keep their jobs in order to make a difference in kids' lives. We can't refuse to give the tests, or turn our backs on the political realities of public education, but OH DO I LOVE HIM. This is a collection of essays and articles that were previously published other places. From the introduction, "WELL DUH" through cheating, through the vital issue of creating readers (or nonreaders), through rubrics (Gotta admit, I've said some of those things), through a lovely 'modest proposal' for 22nd century schools, through his critique of Common Core (one of the most reasoned ones I've read!, Kohn takes all the sacred cows on and he vanquishes them for me...or at least he does, until I get that message for the next Common Core meeting. He may not live in the real world I inhabit, but he makes my world more bearable because he is such a fierce advocate for kids and teachers and education. I trust his vision even when he goes too far -- more to think about!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Liz Murray

    There are no easy answers to the problems facing public education at this time in history but Kohn is able to suggest ways in which it could be improved from the inside out. Kohn takes apart beliefs we have around public schooling, for example the focus on individual work at the expense of group participation: I want to see what *you* can do, on your own. Emphasis on the individual is part and parcel of the American 'ideal' and is currently making testing companies (and many others) very rich. I There are no easy answers to the problems facing public education at this time in history but Kohn is able to suggest ways in which it could be improved from the inside out. Kohn takes apart beliefs we have around public schooling, for example the focus on individual work at the expense of group participation: I want to see what *you* can do, on your own. Emphasis on the individual is part and parcel of the American 'ideal' and is currently making testing companies (and many others) very rich. It is not, however, a healthy way to educate children. Unfortunately damaging 'educational' practices are not going away soon and neither can we suddenly abandon grades and rubrics, despite it being in the best interests of children. Kohn challenges widely held educational beliefs and offers ways to think about them while cognizant of the realities facing public school teachers and students. Each chapter is accompanied by extensive footnotes and references to back up his arguments. Anyone interested in critically examining public education should have this book on the shelves to use as reference in the months and years to come.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Beth Diiorio

    It was helpful to see in print those philosophical pieces of education that we all know are true for every child! I actually took six pages of notes. At times, the author was unrealistic but it was still a good read and reinforcement of why its so important to educate all facets of a student, not just the intellectual.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Alfie Kohn wants to start a revolution in education. He has something to criticize on every facet. Occasionally he even has a suggestion about how to improve education that could realistically be implemented.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mamie

    Great book! At first, I thought it would be boring, but the author actually brought up some really great, creative, valid points that are worth considering. They're things all teachers should keep in consideration, do I'm really glad I read this book. Also, Kohn had a really funny, casual, satirical voice that honestly made me burst out laughing at multiple points. Great book! At first, I thought it would be boring, but the author actually brought up some really great, creative, valid points that are worth considering. They're things all teachers should keep in consideration, do I'm really glad I read this book. Also, Kohn had a really funny, casual, satirical voice that honestly made me burst out laughing at multiple points.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dewin Anguas Barnette

    Absolute brilliance.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Thomas R

    For every essay I agreed with or drew insights from, there were 5 that felt unrelatable or out dated. Really like Alfie Kohn and reading someone you don’t totally agree with can help you grow.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Beth G

    Alfie Kohn is a breath of fresh air. I adore his books.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    great book filled with tastes of ideas that sent me to more books

  11. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    This book fervently promotes progressive education and takes aim at many of the conventional practices taking place in our schools. Kohn says among other things: -There is little or any advantage to homework particularly in elementary and middle school -High school and college teachers have been encouraged to think of themselves as experts in their content areas rather than in pedagogy -The schooling most students have encourages passivity and compliance over questioning and challenging ideas an This book fervently promotes progressive education and takes aim at many of the conventional practices taking place in our schools. Kohn says among other things: -There is little or any advantage to homework particularly in elementary and middle school -High school and college teachers have been encouraged to think of themselves as experts in their content areas rather than in pedagogy -The schooling most students have encourages passivity and compliance over questioning and challenging ideas and authority -Teachers create poorer learning environments by keeping virtually all the power in all classroom decisions made concerning students -Both rewards and punishments can have the opposite effect on a child hoped for by diminishing the intrinsic motivation a child has -Students relentlessly focused on how well they are doing often become less engaged with what they are doing -Even just the act of having students quantify their reading can kill their motivation to read. -Measuring students so closely can lead to children being valued conditionally -Students are not empty glasses into which information can be poured in -It’s not the teacher's actions that matter but the students perceptions of those actions that matter Kohn’s sharp critique causes us to take a step back to see a new perspective on many of the education practices we’ve become accustomed to. A good example example of this is Kohn’s deconstruction of sentiment behind the classic NO WHINING sign on many classroom walls into “I don’t want to hear your complaints about anything you’re being made to do (or prevented from doing)” His rich critique often isn’t thorough enough to win someone over to his side of a position but it does offer a stepping stone toward a new perspective and for that his book is worth reading.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mary Anne

    This is the first book I've read by Kohn, and I'm so glad I read it. My book group has decided to start reading The Homework Myth: Why Our Kids Get Too Much of a Bad Thing, so I've got my library's copy tucked in my room. I digress. One awesome thing about this book is that I actually didn't get the book. Rather, almost all of the chapters were available at Kohn's website, so I highly recommend going there for more of his stuff (bonus points for accessibility). His agenda is progressive education This is the first book I've read by Kohn, and I'm so glad I read it. My book group has decided to start reading The Homework Myth: Why Our Kids Get Too Much of a Bad Thing, so I've got my library's copy tucked in my room. I digress. One awesome thing about this book is that I actually didn't get the book. Rather, almost all of the chapters were available at Kohn's website, so I highly recommend going there for more of his stuff (bonus points for accessibility). His agenda is progressive education, and that system has its own complexities and issues. What I like is that he pushes against boundaries and assumptions we have about children and their learning. I teach college-level students, and while this seems to be mostly geared toward the teachers of younger students, I remind myself that my students were those younger students, so it gives me a greater understanding for how they got to be the way they are when I see them. Overall a fascinating read and an excellent catalyst for discussion among parents and educators.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Leanne

    I 100% support Kohn's view that we "need to maintain a questioning stance. Intellectual progress demands that we refuse to take things at face value, refuse to accept everything we've been told, refuse to assume that the conventional wisdom must be right." Feel-Bad Education, pg. 43 That quotation is a pretty good summary of how I have treated my teaching for the last 30 years--whether I was teaching in public school, home school, private school, or community ed. And I love that Kohn leads the w I 100% support Kohn's view that we "need to maintain a questioning stance. Intellectual progress demands that we refuse to take things at face value, refuse to accept everything we've been told, refuse to assume that the conventional wisdom must be right." Feel-Bad Education, pg. 43 That quotation is a pretty good summary of how I have treated my teaching for the last 30 years--whether I was teaching in public school, home school, private school, or community ed. And I love that Kohn leads the way in important questions. Nevertheless, I am not in love with this book. I am presently teaching 7th grade language arts, and I am always looking for inspiration on education. I should have figured out from the book's title that this was NOT it. I expected Kohn to criticize the public school system, but I assumed he would have at least a couple of innovative solutions. Nope. None that I could find. If you are looking for a pep talk try Kelly Gallagher or read Teach Like your Hair is On Fire. Read Kohn when you need ammunition against the status quo.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    While I am not a huge Alfie Kohn supporter, because he is neither an educator by training nor a researcher, it makes sense understanding his point of view as he has made a name for himself in the world of mainstream education. That said, I like that in this work he draws on tested academic research to make his points. While I work in the mainstream world of public education and support the use of assessments to drive instruction and improve teaching and learning, we have missed the mark with hig While I am not a huge Alfie Kohn supporter, because he is neither an educator by training nor a researcher, it makes sense understanding his point of view as he has made a name for himself in the world of mainstream education. That said, I like that in this work he draws on tested academic research to make his points. While I work in the mainstream world of public education and support the use of assessments to drive instruction and improve teaching and learning, we have missed the mark with high stakes tests with delayed results that are neither useful for the child, the parents, nor their teachers. We are tasked with preparing children for a future that is rapidly changing and working within the framework of a system developed more than 100 years ago that was originally designed to meet the needs of an industrial workforce. Certainly there is no quick fix, no magic pill for educating young minds, but what are our next steps??

  15. 5 out of 5

    Misha

    I read most of these essays elsewhere, but Kohn is a writer best revisited and reread. His writing style is dense while also totally accessible. Full disclosure--I love Kohn and agree with most of what he has to say about education (tests and standards are bad, bad, bad and undermining actual education and most homework is a crock) and parenting (unconditional is best) even though I know that these ideals can be hard to attain (institutionally and personally). Kohn asks us to take a hard look at a I read most of these essays elsewhere, but Kohn is a writer best revisited and reread. His writing style is dense while also totally accessible. Full disclosure--I love Kohn and agree with most of what he has to say about education (tests and standards are bad, bad, bad and undermining actual education and most homework is a crock) and parenting (unconditional is best) even though I know that these ideals can be hard to attain (institutionally and personally). Kohn asks us to take a hard look at assumptions we have held dear or relied on for too long. He asks that we strive for greater things by reexamining ourselves and our institutions. I, for one, am so glad that Kohn is out there championing these causes.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Audra

    Classic Alfie Kohn -- asking questions, forcing us to think a little bit more deeply about the decisions are handed down to us as teachers. I would give this 5 stars except that it is true that many of these essays are available on his website, though there is a convenience to having them all in one place when you are on an airplane. I also wish that the book would help us think more about how we, as educators, can fight back against this system. I know that teachers have been outspoken against Classic Alfie Kohn -- asking questions, forcing us to think a little bit more deeply about the decisions are handed down to us as teachers. I would give this 5 stars except that it is true that many of these essays are available on his website, though there is a convenience to having them all in one place when you are on an airplane. I also wish that the book would help us think more about how we, as educators, can fight back against this system. I know that teachers have been outspoken against many of the things in this book (e.g., common core standards, standardized testing, one-size-fits-all approach) yet these measures keep getting added. What do we need to do differently? How can we broach the problem differently? That would be a very insightful & much needed book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    First of all I should say that I had to return this book to the library before I finished it. That being said - i gave this book two stars not because I disagreed with what the author was saying - on the contrary. I agree with many of his progressive ideas and theories for improving the educational system (and learning in general). I just feel that it’s nothing I haven’t heard before. To be quite honest, I got bored. That’s why I didn’t finish it in time. I’ll try to pick it up again at some poi First of all I should say that I had to return this book to the library before I finished it. That being said - i gave this book two stars not because I disagreed with what the author was saying - on the contrary. I agree with many of his progressive ideas and theories for improving the educational system (and learning in general). I just feel that it’s nothing I haven’t heard before. To be quite honest, I got bored. That’s why I didn’t finish it in time. I’ll try to pick it up again at some point I’m sure. Hopefully then it’ll change my mind- but until then, it’s getting 2 stars.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Clint

    Another good read by Alfie Kohn. As a teacher, I connected more with section 2 and 3 since I feel like I have a direct relation with the topics and could actually utilize them in my classroom. At times, what he points out seems to good to be true because its not the norm in the teaching world, but just because its the norm doesn't mean its always the best way to do it. Even though the writing is directed towards educators, I believe parents should also read this book as well. It will allow paren Another good read by Alfie Kohn. As a teacher, I connected more with section 2 and 3 since I feel like I have a direct relation with the topics and could actually utilize them in my classroom. At times, what he points out seems to good to be true because its not the norm in the teaching world, but just because its the norm doesn't mean its always the best way to do it. Even though the writing is directed towards educators, I believe parents should also read this book as well. It will allow parents to have guided questions to think about what and why their child's teacher does in the classroom.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I don't agree with all of Alfie Kohn's points, but it was a fascinating read. I particularly enjoyed his humor and ideas in Challenging Students, How to Create Nonreaders and Bad Signs. In Who's Cheating Whom? I fully expected him to discuss how collaboration is valued in the workplace and called cheating in school, and it was mentioned, but he spent the bulk of the chapter on a more profound point--if by cheating it is possible for a student to get a better grade, then the exam is not testing a I don't agree with all of Alfie Kohn's points, but it was a fascinating read. I particularly enjoyed his humor and ideas in Challenging Students, How to Create Nonreaders and Bad Signs. In Who's Cheating Whom? I fully expected him to discuss how collaboration is valued in the workplace and called cheating in school, and it was mentioned, but he spent the bulk of the chapter on a more profound point--if by cheating it is possible for a student to get a better grade, then the exam is not testing anything of value. I recommend Feel-Bad Education for homeschooling parents and conventional educators, too.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I read this because, coming upon it in the bookstore, I suspected that Mr. Kohn had managed to articulate much of my dissatisfaction and even discomfort with my own teaching practice and the context in which I'm teaching. He did not disappoint. His views are extreme, even to someone as liberal as me, but refreshing in this time when teachers feel they must teach to the test in order to keep their jobs. I do not agree with everything Mr. Kohn writes, but I do intend to change my teaching practice I read this because, coming upon it in the bookstore, I suspected that Mr. Kohn had managed to articulate much of my dissatisfaction and even discomfort with my own teaching practice and the context in which I'm teaching. He did not disappoint. His views are extreme, even to someone as liberal as me, but refreshing in this time when teachers feel they must teach to the test in order to keep their jobs. I do not agree with everything Mr. Kohn writes, but I do intend to change my teaching practice as a result of reading this book, and I can't wait to start.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Some of this book is awesome and some just crazy (and I'm sure Alfie Kohn knows that), but each essay should be a catalyst for great discussion. When reading Alfie Kohn, you have to remember that he is at one extreme and just use his ideas to spark new thinking. Many of his ideas are spot on (testing, standards, rubrics, and much of the pedagogy stuff), but I disagree with a lot of the classroom management, disciplining children stuff, motivation stuff. I bet he had one wild and crazy classroom! Some of this book is awesome and some just crazy (and I'm sure Alfie Kohn knows that), but each essay should be a catalyst for great discussion. When reading Alfie Kohn, you have to remember that he is at one extreme and just use his ideas to spark new thinking. Many of his ideas are spot on (testing, standards, rubrics, and much of the pedagogy stuff), but I disagree with a lot of the classroom management, disciplining children stuff, motivation stuff. I bet he had one wild and crazy classroom!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    I really appreciated this look at our schools and school policies from a progressive perspective. A lot of what he says makes so much sense. Sometimes I think he takes evidence and railroads us into a conclusion that might not necessarily be true, but for the most part I think he is right on target. I especially enjoyed his critique of the culture of schools--safety, achievement, motivation, inspiration-- and the parenting piece on supernanny.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    This author has filled his book with a collection of incredibly persuasive essays on what he thinks the education system does wrong. For identifying these problems in such a clear way, he is to be commended; however, the shortcoming of the book is that it is much lighter on practical suggestions and demonstrations on how to run a progressive classroom without losing the kids to rowdy abandon. Putting educational theory into practice is always the hard part!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lora

    Kohn covers a lot more territory here than in _What does it Mean to be Well Educated_, repeats many of the old arguments, to great effect. I'm changing my classroom again. And composing a letter to the author. If you are one of those educators who is trying to get real learning to happen in your classroom, Kohn is always required reading for reflection on your practice. After 20 years + in education, I'm humbled into change, again. Kohn covers a lot more territory here than in _What does it Mean to be Well Educated_, repeats many of the old arguments, to great effect. I'm changing my classroom again. And composing a letter to the author. If you are one of those educators who is trying to get real learning to happen in your classroom, Kohn is always required reading for reflection on your practice. After 20 years + in education, I'm humbled into change, again.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Irene

    Second book in my streak of education books. Maybe third? Well. This author is ridiculous- we need to take him with a grain of salt. But his points are valid, indeed, very recent, since the book was published in 2011. I especially enjoyed his essays over cheating, self-discipline (and why it's overrated), and autonomy. Allow me to copy my reading log over the cheating and autonomy chapters: First of all, cheating is extremely relative. <- to be continued tomorrow Second book in my streak of education books. Maybe third? Well. This author is ridiculous- we need to take him with a grain of salt. But his points are valid, indeed, very recent, since the book was published in 2011. I especially enjoyed his essays over cheating, self-discipline (and why it's overrated), and autonomy. Allow me to copy my reading log over the cheating and autonomy chapters: First of all, cheating is extremely relative. <- to be continued tomorrow

  26. 5 out of 5

    Saraelizabeth

    This is a collection of essays by Alfie Kohn. I randomly picked it up off the education shelf at the library and I'm so glad I did. It is absolutely wonderful! An honest look at education and what needs to be thrown out. It was very inspiring to me. I found myself cheering inside as I read each essay thinking, "YES! YES! That is why I homeschool!" I also recognized many ways I could improve our little school at home so it's not so "School AT home". This is a collection of essays by Alfie Kohn. I randomly picked it up off the education shelf at the library and I'm so glad I did. It is absolutely wonderful! An honest look at education and what needs to be thrown out. It was very inspiring to me. I found myself cheering inside as I read each essay thinking, "YES! YES! That is why I homeschool!" I also recognized many ways I could improve our little school at home so it's not so "School AT home".

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christian

    Clandestinely reading this book during my teacher preparation program probably lowered my grade by filling my mind with irritation towards the standards-oriented corporate agenda that we were being force fed. Took time away from polishing my 12th essay about the Teacher Performance Expectations. Allowed me a tiny space to breathe under the avalanche of pressure from all sides that is teaching in America. Thank you Alfie!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Qwerty

    This book covers familiar territory for those familiar with Alfie Kohn's work; rewards and punishments destroy self-motivation, homework is of little value, need more "working with" and less "doing to" kids. Because this is a collection of articles the points he raises become a bit redundant, but this is an otherwise worthwhile read. This book covers familiar territory for those familiar with Alfie Kohn's work; rewards and punishments destroy self-motivation, homework is of little value, need more "working with" and less "doing to" kids. Because this is a collection of articles the points he raises become a bit redundant, but this is an otherwise worthwhile read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I didn't enjoy it as much as the two books of his I previously read - maybe because this was a collection of essays written for other publications, it didn't feel as cohesive, and much of it was repetition of concepts covered in those two books. It'd make a good first read for someone trying to understand what Alfie Kohn is about, or considering some of the current topics in education reform. I didn't enjoy it as much as the two books of his I previously read - maybe because this was a collection of essays written for other publications, it didn't feel as cohesive, and much of it was repetition of concepts covered in those two books. It'd make a good first read for someone trying to understand what Alfie Kohn is about, or considering some of the current topics in education reform.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    This is a collection of essays published in the past several years by the long-time advocate of progressive education and incisive critic of education policies. If you've never read any of Kohn's other books, this is a great introduction. He has a refreshingly rational, thoughtful mind on these matters. This is a collection of essays published in the past several years by the long-time advocate of progressive education and incisive critic of education policies. If you've never read any of Kohn's other books, this is a great introduction. He has a refreshingly rational, thoughtful mind on these matters.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...