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The New World

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Sir Winston Churchill's classic History of the English-Speaking Peoples; with an introduction by Andrew Roberts, author of Eminent Churchillians Sir Winston Churchill's classic History of the English-Speaking Peoples; with an introduction by Andrew Roberts, author of Eminent Churchillians


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Sir Winston Churchill's classic History of the English-Speaking Peoples; with an introduction by Andrew Roberts, author of Eminent Churchillians Sir Winston Churchill's classic History of the English-Speaking Peoples; with an introduction by Andrew Roberts, author of Eminent Churchillians

30 review for The New World

  1. 5 out of 5

    booklady

    While many have found fault with his historical method, and others have critiqued his idiosyncrasies, Time itself will — I believe — prove the truth in the spirit of Winston's writing if not in the letter. For all his faults, I love him! Although his bust no longer adorns the Oval Office, my four volume set of Winnie's History of the English Speaking Peoples shall continue to adorn my bookshelves and be referred to whenever the subject of British history comes up. Sadly, I have never read them c While many have found fault with his historical method, and others have critiqued his idiosyncrasies, Time itself will — I believe — prove the truth in the spirit of Winston's writing if not in the letter. For all his faults, I love him! Although his bust no longer adorns the Oval Office, my four volume set of Winnie's History of the English Speaking Peoples shall continue to adorn my bookshelves and be referred to whenever the subject of British history comes up. Sadly, I have never read them cover-to-cover, but I have enjoyed large sections from each of the volumes. Churchill is witty, wise and incisive with a love for the English speaking peoples, on both sides of the Atlantic(!), borne of his Anglo-American parentage. If you don't read any other history of Great Britain, read this one.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    This shed some light for me on an incredibly interesting period in English history: basically covering England in the 1600s, the wars between Catholics and Protestants, the backdrop to the Westminster Assembly (which was an incredibly tumultuous time) and all that happened after. Very fascinating and Churchill has an excellent grasp of the various mechanisms and motivations at play, even if he does have some biased areas himself.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ray Campbell

    The saga continues in this second volume of A History of the English Speaking People. In this book we go from the rise of the Tudors to the rise of the American Colonies and the Restoration of the monarchy. It is fascinating to see the development of rights and the evolution of the common man taking powers bit by bit over the centuries. Churchill is clearly writing with the perspective of a leader who has seen the worst of what dictators can be. I've read other accounts of this period which aggra The saga continues in this second volume of A History of the English Speaking People. In this book we go from the rise of the Tudors to the rise of the American Colonies and the Restoration of the monarchy. It is fascinating to see the development of rights and the evolution of the common man taking powers bit by bit over the centuries. Churchill is clearly writing with the perspective of a leader who has seen the worst of what dictators can be. I've read other accounts of this period which aggrandize Cromwell. It is clear Cromwell was a significant part of the limited monarchy and recognition of rights of the common man which have given rise to freedom in the western world. It is possible to tell his tale in a favorable light. However, Churchill pulls no punches in pointing out that he was a dictator who employed brutality and extreme measures. Churchill's is a welcome and refreshing perspective. He also sees Henry VIII and Elizabeth in less favorable light than others I've read. He is not openly critical in the way he is of Cromwell, but he provides insight whenever any monarchs act in a dictatorial manner. I was delighted and impressed by Churchill's first volume because I knew very little about Roman Britain. I am less impressed by this installment, though it is first class history, it is material with which I am somewhat familiar. For a reader unfamiliar with this period or people, this is certainly an outstanding survey, well researched and readable. However, the greatest strength of this book is Churchill's unique perspective, himself an historical figure. I look forward to the next in the series as Churchill connects the events of the past to the rise of the free world with all the rights, liberties and prosperity we enjoy today.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gina Johnson

    As is to be expected with history, some parts were more exciting than others, but overall I very much enjoy Churchill’s histories. They’re informative and well written.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Volume II proceeds more slowly and deliberately than Volume I, covering fewer regimes in a greater number of pages. Henry VIII breaks with the Catholic Church, Richard II is a swine, and then Charles I tries to get the king’s mojo back, but his reign devolves into 12 years of “Personal Rule” and a dissolved Parliament, which then brings on Cromwell and the Roundheads, and the first standing commoner-officered army who end up reeking Puritan havoc on the land, and when finally the dust settles an Volume II proceeds more slowly and deliberately than Volume I, covering fewer regimes in a greater number of pages. Henry VIII breaks with the Catholic Church, Richard II is a swine, and then Charles I tries to get the king’s mojo back, but his reign devolves into 12 years of “Personal Rule” and a dissolved Parliament, which then brings on Cromwell and the Roundheads, and the first standing commoner-officered army who end up reeking Puritan havoc on the land, and when finally the dust settles and the fires are quenched, Parliament has brought back a king, Charles II. Reading of the long struggle between the supporters of centralized government (in the person of a king or queen) and supporters of decentralized government (in the persons of an elected parliament) puts me in mind of what is happening in America today and gives insight into some of the possible directions matters could take. I am supported by George Orwell (in his more optimistic London bombing days) when I say that it seems that whatever happens in America, the ultimate result will remain some form of republican government.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lily Wallaker

    Reading this as a school assignment, I often did narrations on what I'd read. This book was interesting, but it was obvious that Churchill was partial to one party or the other throughout basically the entire book. For example, near the end of the book he makes it clear that he did not approve of Oliver Cromwell at all. Therefore, it was hard to see things from both sides. In this manner it often disagreed with other history books that were about the same era. Other than that, it was good! Reading this as a school assignment, I often did narrations on what I'd read. This book was interesting, but it was obvious that Churchill was partial to one party or the other throughout basically the entire book. For example, near the end of the book he makes it clear that he did not approve of Oliver Cromwell at all. Therefore, it was hard to see things from both sides. In this manner it often disagreed with other history books that were about the same era. Other than that, it was good!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Clayton

    I was interested in learning more about the English Civil War and had this book on my shelf for a long time. I finally picked it up and read it. I enjoyed the book. I always heard what I felt would be Churchill’s voice while reading the text. Churchill is deeply versed in the political and royal figures of the day. I found myself referencing Wikipedia frequently to gain some understanding of all the players he mentions in the book. I suggest reading the book for Churchill’s grand prose and be re I was interested in learning more about the English Civil War and had this book on my shelf for a long time. I finally picked it up and read it. I enjoyed the book. I always heard what I felt would be Churchill’s voice while reading the text. Churchill is deeply versed in the political and royal figures of the day. I found myself referencing Wikipedia frequently to gain some understanding of all the players he mentions in the book. I suggest reading the book for Churchill’s grand prose and be ready to use Wikipedia and other sources to fill in the background.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cherif Jazra

    This is a very engaging book I highly recommend. It was my first, delving into the intricate threads shaping English rule in the 16 and 17th century. The focus of this volume is mostly on the kings and queen and their interactions with the House of Commons and lords, with which they often fought. From the start of the Stuart monarchy with Henry VII, the break wth Rome over the divorce of Henry VIII with Catherine in order to marry Ann Boleyn(which he later got rid of), the rules of queen Elizabe This is a very engaging book I highly recommend. It was my first, delving into the intricate threads shaping English rule in the 16 and 17th century. The focus of this volume is mostly on the kings and queen and their interactions with the House of Commons and lords, with which they often fought. From the start of the Stuart monarchy with Henry VII, the break wth Rome over the divorce of Henry VIII with Catherine in order to marry Ann Boleyn(which he later got rid of), the rules of queen Elizabeth and the fights with the Spanish, the first civil war, the era of dictatorship under Cromwell, the restoration and the final glorious revolution of 1688, the rise and fall of such men as Pym, Stafford, Shaftesbury (who was the philosopher John Locke's patron), and even an ancestor of Churchill. A great cast of characters! We see kings and queens, statesmen, generals and clergy, overtaken by the greatest religious upheaval in modern times Europe: the Reformation and the spread of Protestantism. This phenomena was of such huge consequence that it is impossible to overlook in any discussion about the transition out of the feudal and medieval age, towards the age of individual rights, democracy, constitutional governments and market and trade economies. I was very happy to hear the story in the words of Winston Churchill whose smooth, almost conversational style makes the ride on the historical train a delight. It has given me great background context for my readings in the history of political philosophy, which just started with John Locke's second treatise of government.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I have been reading this book at the rate of a few pages a day, like a textbook, so it has taken almost two months to finish. That pace was used deliberately to help me absorb the facts better. If you enjoy history and especially enjoy English history, this is a terrific book and I highly recommend it. My admiration for Winston Churchill, already great, has grown astronomically. This history was such an ambitious undertaking and he did it well. The book is readable and interesting; Churchill fo I have been reading this book at the rate of a few pages a day, like a textbook, so it has taken almost two months to finish. That pace was used deliberately to help me absorb the facts better. If you enjoy history and especially enjoy English history, this is a terrific book and I highly recommend it. My admiration for Winston Churchill, already great, has grown astronomically. This history was such an ambitious undertaking and he did it well. The book is readable and interesting; Churchill focuses on events and years, but also the people, and the interactions between the people. If only I could retain a tenth of what I read! An interesting plus for me is that in these turbulent political times, the series of English civil wars and religious disagreements(!) (the text starts with the Tudors and ends in 1688 after Oliver Cromwell and the restoration) gives me faith that the United States will find its way through our own turbulent times. I plan to take a break from history and then order Vol III, the Age of Revolution.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Simone

    This book was a pleasure to listen to. The narrator is very competent, and manages to interpret the text with wit and meaning. The information in it is very extensive, and very well presented and balanced. Even though it comprised periods of history which I don't know much of, I was able to follow the main events and personages and learn a lot from it. Churchill's phrasing and writing is superb. There are various parts in which he seems to speak to the reader, in which he puts asides about curre This book was a pleasure to listen to. The narrator is very competent, and manages to interpret the text with wit and meaning. The information in it is very extensive, and very well presented and balanced. Even though it comprised periods of history which I don't know much of, I was able to follow the main events and personages and learn a lot from it. Churchill's phrasing and writing is superb. There are various parts in which he seems to speak to the reader, in which he puts asides about current affairs and how certain events unfolded throughout history.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Zuvich

    A very good and relatively brief overview of the time from Henry VIII to the Glorious Revolution of 1688. Some (not much) historical information contained herein is, granted, generally out-of-date now (due to more research having been done since the publication of the book) but on the whole, this book was well-written, interesting, and informative.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Francisca

    I'm fairly convinced that from 1457 till 1688, Wales did not exist. I'm fairly convinced that from 1457 till 1688, Wales did not exist.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    First let me make clear that I did not read and am not reviewing any book in the collection other than this for one main reason: This is the volume (first-run Book of the Month Club that my father had) that I have on my shelf. Continuing that thought, it will probably be the last volume in the collection I shall read and review. Simply, this is not at all what I expected. Given Churchill's reputation for elegance in his use of the English language I imagined a volume rich in depth and explanation First let me make clear that I did not read and am not reviewing any book in the collection other than this for one main reason: This is the volume (first-run Book of the Month Club that my father had) that I have on my shelf. Continuing that thought, it will probably be the last volume in the collection I shall read and review. Simply, this is not at all what I expected. Given Churchill's reputation for elegance in his use of the English language I imagined a volume rich in depth and explanation of what it was that made the English-speaking peoples any different from any other in terms of cultural development. It was not there. As a critic noted in a bi-fold from BOMC that accompanies the book, Churchill was not an academician nor is this a book an academic history in any way. As noted there and as is obvious from reading "The New World," Churchill's idea of history is centered on two things: the doings of English monarchs and nobles, as well as the Catholic, Anglican, and Presbyterian churches, particularly as they relate to how the monarchs rule. Social and cultural things (outside of religion) afoot in that era may as well not exist. Shakespeare? One mention. Marlowe. Nada. You get the idea. So what does that leave us? The Stuarts and the English Civil War. Throw in a touch of Mary, Queen of Scots and that's the drive here. Henry VIII, Elizabeth and that cast of characters. Naturally, to place this history into any context requires a look at the break from Rome and the popes. While it is easy to think of the break from the Catholic Church as Henry VIII's way of getting divorce legalized, Churchill does do it justice by taking us through a triptych of what led to the schism. One factor was the rise of Protestantism after Luther posted his theses in what is now Germany. Another was the rise of English nationalism. Why should the English monarch and the church take marching orders from Rome or somewhere else in the Empire? Think of it as the Brexit of its times, but with history-changing results. Work in the advent of the Puritans, who essentially forced the civil war (they certainly didn't all climb on the Mayflower to colonize North America) with Oliver Cromwell as their top general and then dictator, and we get the makings of a state that leans more heavily on representative governance than (admittedly without checking) pretty much anywhere in the developed world at the time. Speaking of North America, this volume is titled "The New World," but that is misleading. Contemporary history regards that phrase being the provenance of the discovery of the Americas by and for Europeans, yet the colonies of those powers are hardly mentioned and herein play a scant role in the history being told. Not having Churchill nearby, one might extrapolate from the book's content that "The New World" referenced is less about the Americas and more about the changing powers of the English monarchy and the unprecedented rise (for its time, of course) of representative governance, not to mention the departure from the Catholic Church as the state religion. Not a long read, but his English chauvinism, perhaps characteristic of a man who still thought and dreamed of the Empire as it was when he was younger, one on which the sun never set and was a dominant force, does shine through. And he is naturally proud of his family's place (and his namesake's place therein) in English history. In any event, this is not a critical book for one to read, but if you have a little time and want a quick run-through of that era, this may do nicely.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

    As Pamela can attest, Winston Churchill is one of my heroes. She even discovered the existence of the Churchill War Rooms Museum in London during our trip there, and gave me ample time to explore it, of which I took full advantage. For those who question my patriotism, Winston Churchill was an honorary U.S. Citizen, and some Presidents have adorned the Oval Office with Churchill’s bust, though not my man, Obama, for some reason. From reading about Churchill’s life, I’ve recently transitioned int As Pamela can attest, Winston Churchill is one of my heroes. She even discovered the existence of the Churchill War Rooms Museum in London during our trip there, and gave me ample time to explore it, of which I took full advantage. For those who question my patriotism, Winston Churchill was an honorary U.S. Citizen, and some Presidents have adorned the Oval Office with Churchill’s bust, though not my man, Obama, for some reason. From reading about Churchill’s life, I’ve recently transitioned into reading his works as an author. He is a good writer (he won the Nobel Prize in Literature) and during the latest lockdown, I ordered his 4 volume History of the English Speaking Peoples. The first volume was decent; it covered so much history that it was hard to keep my bearings. This volume, the second, is outstanding. It covers a much shorter historic timeframe than the first, allowing the reader to understand and sympathize with those Englishmen and Americans (the New World is colonized during the time period this book covers) who ‘strut their hour upon the stage’ in this book. I’m glad I purchased these books, and I’ll soon move on to the 3rd and 4th volumes.

  15. 4 out of 5

    David Pyle

    I found this volume of The History of the English Speaking Peoples intriguing, especially because within its pages I believe I found the impetus of this project. The close of the book sees the end of the reign of King James II; in both his reign and his father’s (King Charles II), distant forbears of the author (William and John Churchill) play significant parts. Sir Winston Churchill has an evident bias toward the Anglican Church, as opposed to the other options, not surprisingly. He does, howev I found this volume of The History of the English Speaking Peoples intriguing, especially because within its pages I believe I found the impetus of this project. The close of the book sees the end of the reign of King James II; in both his reign and his father’s (King Charles II), distant forbears of the author (William and John Churchill) play significant parts. Sir Winston Churchill has an evident bias toward the Anglican Church, as opposed to the other options, not surprisingly. He does, however, clearly point out the hypocrisy of all sides in his accounting. It is astounding to see how large a part the broad sectarian divide played in the history of the Island Nation, beginning in Volume 1 with Celtic versus Christian, carrying through to the Catholic/Anglican/Puritan/Anabaptist conflicts in this book. In a sense, that whole conflict played a huge part in our nation’s founding (The United States of America). It’s 1688 now and I’m excited to see the next volume unfold. Carry on, good sir!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    This volumes covers The Tudor Dynasty, sorting out the mess of Henry VIII and the church. There is considerable coverage of the religious issues of the day. The Cardinal Wolsey episodes, the break with Rome, Martin Luther's impact in the world leading to the reformation. England's clash with Spain in the Spanish Armada, the beginning of the new frontiers in America as the Mayflower sets sail. The final quarter of the book deals with the English civil war, the Cromwell era, and as the political p This volumes covers The Tudor Dynasty, sorting out the mess of Henry VIII and the church. There is considerable coverage of the religious issues of the day. The Cardinal Wolsey episodes, the break with Rome, Martin Luther's impact in the world leading to the reformation. England's clash with Spain in the Spanish Armada, the beginning of the new frontiers in America as the Mayflower sets sail. The final quarter of the book deals with the English civil war, the Cromwell era, and as the political parties of the Whigs and Tories arrive on the scene as the Catholic King James II tries to bring back catholicism to England the people revolt as the book ends with the Revolution of 1688, keeping the catholic religion from being re-established in England. Oh and there are more wars. conquering, hangings and beheading's in case you wondered, this time around people were getting a bit fed up with arbitrary punishment. Liberty on the rise you say???

  17. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    I am reading this celebrated work volume by volume. I think that this second volume - which broadly covers the Tudor and Stuart monarchies - is more convincing that the first volume. I say this because I detect Churchill's greater interest and engagement in the subjects covered, particularly the civil wars of the seventeenth century. Churchill's focus is high politics and the military campaigns. The narrative drives forward with purple prose and the reader gains a good understanding of the seque I am reading this celebrated work volume by volume. I think that this second volume - which broadly covers the Tudor and Stuart monarchies - is more convincing that the first volume. I say this because I detect Churchill's greater interest and engagement in the subjects covered, particularly the civil wars of the seventeenth century. Churchill's focus is high politics and the military campaigns. The narrative drives forward with purple prose and the reader gains a good understanding of the sequence of events. Absent is any real analysis of what was happening and of how the kingdom's economy and society developed. Moreover, the sources were limited and out-of-date at the time that the volumes were produced. Nevertheless, this is an enjoyable read and is worthy of attention for the story that is tells and for the perspective of the story-teller.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    For writing, for thoroughness of research, and for scope, this book is definitely 5 stars. Yet, the last third, about the Republic, the Restoration, and the Revolution became tiresome. The crux of all the conflict, personal rights vs. absolute rule was overlaid with constant religious intolerance. The final chapter was about as happy as this period could be in that a king was replaced without war and without execution or murder. (No spoiler alert necessary because this is history.) Churchill's a For writing, for thoroughness of research, and for scope, this book is definitely 5 stars. Yet, the last third, about the Republic, the Restoration, and the Revolution became tiresome. The crux of all the conflict, personal rights vs. absolute rule was overlaid with constant religious intolerance. The final chapter was about as happy as this period could be in that a king was replaced without war and without execution or murder. (No spoiler alert necessary because this is history.) Churchill's ancestors made their appearance during this period; he handled their actions respectfully as would be expected. I did find the entire sections on the Tudor dynasty and the Civil Wars of the 17th century both familiar and fascinating.

  19. 4 out of 5

    John Poulain

    Similar to the first installment, Churchill focuses on legendary events, creation of institutions and the church. Covering up to the Glorious Revolution the book highlights a lot of important points. At times the book shows it's age, simultaneously saying that 'tyranny can only exist in servile races' and decrying Victorian historians. His own ancestors take precedence when they appear beyond their import. The large chunk of the book deals with the Civil War and ramifications highlighting a lot Similar to the first installment, Churchill focuses on legendary events, creation of institutions and the church. Covering up to the Glorious Revolution the book highlights a lot of important points. At times the book shows it's age, simultaneously saying that 'tyranny can only exist in servile races' and decrying Victorian historians. His own ancestors take precedence when they appear beyond their import. The large chunk of the book deals with the Civil War and ramifications highlighting a lot if complexities that I didn't know, the simplistic story of Cromwell fighting a dictatorship only to fall prey to the same temptations is found to be far much more complicated than I remember.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This second volume of Churchill's History of the English Speaking Peoples was fantastic. I love the way Churchill writes, and I think for these historical works, he mixes in just the right amount of information with his personal touch and opinions. I think he is biased toward the greatness of England (in his mind), but I find this gives more character to the books. This volume covered the Tudors and the Stuarts and filled in some gaps in my knowledge (particularly with the Stuarts). Looking forw This second volume of Churchill's History of the English Speaking Peoples was fantastic. I love the way Churchill writes, and I think for these historical works, he mixes in just the right amount of information with his personal touch and opinions. I think he is biased toward the greatness of England (in his mind), but I find this gives more character to the books. This volume covered the Tudors and the Stuarts and filled in some gaps in my knowledge (particularly with the Stuarts). Looking forward to the next one.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Curtis Bentley

    Other reviews have summer up the content. The Tudors through 1688, with a dash of America thrown in. You either love Churchill's narrative historical style, or you hate it. I enjoy it. This is all new to me, and I'm learning a lot. The series is highly recommended, especially for Americans looking for a high level overview of English history. Other reviews have summer up the content. The Tudors through 1688, with a dash of America thrown in. You either love Churchill's narrative historical style, or you hate it. I enjoy it. This is all new to me, and I'm learning a lot. The series is highly recommended, especially for Americans looking for a high level overview of English history.

  22. 5 out of 5

    James Richardson

    I just read The New Word A History of the English Speaking Peoples Volume 2 by Winston Spencer Churchill. Great book highlightening the reigns of the Tudors and Stuarts, often turbulent, and the Protestant Reformation's impact on England. The English Civil War and colonization is also stressed. A fine book. I especially liked the information provided on Oliver Cromwell. I just read The New Word A History of the English Speaking Peoples Volume 2 by Winston Spencer Churchill. Great book highlightening the reigns of the Tudors and Stuarts, often turbulent, and the Protestant Reformation's impact on England. The English Civil War and colonization is also stressed. A fine book. I especially liked the information provided on Oliver Cromwell.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jdb

    Not as compelling as volume 1. So many names of minor historical figures that only a student of English history could put them in perspective. The constant warring over royal succession and religious controversies make it clear why our founding fathers created our government structure the way they did.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eliza Fitzgerald

    I took over a year to read this book 🤣 following along with my daughter's history readings in Our Island Story by H.E. Marshall. It was interesting to see the extra details. I would especially recommend this volume for Americans who want to have a better idea of the background and build up to the colonization of America and eventual revolution. I took over a year to read this book 🤣 following along with my daughter's history readings in Our Island Story by H.E. Marshall. It was interesting to see the extra details. I would especially recommend this volume for Americans who want to have a better idea of the background and build up to the colonization of America and eventual revolution.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gordon

    An interesting, high level view of the history of the English speaking world as seen by the great Sir Winston Churchill. Covers the Tudors and the Stuarts. Perhaps most amusing is the brief mention of the author's eponymous predecessor. An interesting, high level view of the history of the English speaking world as seen by the great Sir Winston Churchill. Covers the Tudors and the Stuarts. Perhaps most amusing is the brief mention of the author's eponymous predecessor.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Legens

    Churchill finds his groove with the second instalment. He admires the Tudors as the founders of the modern English nation and, as an ardent parlamentarian, takes much interest in the conflict between Parliament and monarchs under the Stuarts.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Liza May

    Bit more tedious than Volume I, but fantastic; and narration for the audible version is excellent.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Excellent, erudite account of British history by a remarkable statesman and gifted writer!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ginny

    As good as the first volume. For me it’s a wonderful enlightening overview of English history. I especially liked the part on the Tudor dynasty. Ends just before Wm. and Mary take over.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Frank Ashe

    Churchill could write so well. That's what gives this 5 stars. Churchill could write so well. That's what gives this 5 stars.

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