Hot Best Seller

30 review for Black Nationalism and the Revolution in Music

  1. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    This book is definitely a product of its time (1970), with a lot of overheated Marxist rhetoric and more than a few arguments directed at straw men. Kofsky favors anecdotes and hyperbole over research and data. Which is a shame, since the book's main argument seems sound: White club owners, label heads and promoters make a more stable living than black jazz musicians, and this is directly related to the racist culture of the United States. His point that most critics are essentially publicists d This book is definitely a product of its time (1970), with a lot of overheated Marxist rhetoric and more than a few arguments directed at straw men. Kofsky favors anecdotes and hyperbole over research and data. Which is a shame, since the book's main argument seems sound: White club owners, label heads and promoters make a more stable living than black jazz musicians, and this is directly related to the racist culture of the United States. His point that most critics are essentially publicists due to their fear of losing favor with record labels and management is surely as true today as it was in the late '60s, if not more so. The last third or so of the book deals more with aesthetics, particularly John Coltrane's music, and the tone is more measured. The themes of this book are ones that needed addressing, and to some extent most remain relevant today, but this is a polemic, a screed, not scholarship, and as history I'd approach it with caution.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Includes a lot of diatribes, but also an illuminating interview with Coltrane.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Naeem

    I read this in 1975 while listening to "free jazz." I can barely remember it and will need to read it again. I do recall that it feed my need to connect music, racism, political economy, and politics. I had never read anything like it and still don't recall with as much fire and volatility. I read this in 1975 while listening to "free jazz." I can barely remember it and will need to read it again. I do recall that it feed my need to connect music, racism, political economy, and politics. I had never read anything like it and still don't recall with as much fire and volatility.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    kofsky manages to combine his background in sociology & his passion for the then new music to provide a solid & well-informed look at the social and political dimensions of jazz, c.1969. nice little mccoy tyner & coltrane interviews in the back.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris Meloche

  6. 4 out of 5

    Garry

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brent

  8. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Buck

  9. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  10. 5 out of 5

    Raymond

  11. 5 out of 5

    Aphiwe

  12. 5 out of 5

    lynnee denise

  13. 4 out of 5

    Matt Benham

  14. 5 out of 5

    JW

  15. 4 out of 5

    Vinnie Ferguson

  16. 5 out of 5

    Luke Riedlinger

  17. 5 out of 5

    Josh Ronsen

  18. 4 out of 5

    Léon

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jamar Roberts

  20. 4 out of 5

    Melvin Cade Jr.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kamen

  23. 5 out of 5

    Liquidlasagna

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sara-Maria

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brad Duncan

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bob Brownlee

  28. 4 out of 5

    Wade

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nicolas Maldonado

  30. 5 out of 5

    Scott Carlson

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...