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Bloody Poetry

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Full Length, Drama / 3m, 2f / Bare stage This fascinating drama, staged to acclaim in London and New York, has in its cast of characters Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Shelley and Claire Goodwin. The play is about radicalism artistic, political and more. Taking place in Italy, it concerns the characters' various ideas about radical politics and free love. Along the Full Length, Drama / 3m, 2f / Bare stage This fascinating drama, staged to acclaim in London and New York, has in its cast of characters Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Shelley and Claire Goodwin. The play is about radicalism artistic, political and more. Taking place in Italy, it concerns the characters' various ideas about radical politics and free love. Along the way, a number of serious questions are raised, not the least of which is why fervent radicals seem so often to be done in by their reprehensible characters. At the end of the play Byron attends the cremation of Shelley on the beach at Viareggio and delivers a stunning ovation over the pyre: "Burn him. Burn us all. A great big bloody beautiful fire." "Radicalism, artistic defiance, an intellectual rage. These are the virtues celebrated in this extraordinary dream play which begins, as it ends, on a foreign shore." London Financial Times. "A phantasmagoric play. . . . Brenton is celebrating the idea of the committed artist who seeks to stir and provoke sullen, defeated, bourgeois England. At the same time with clear eyed honesty, he shows how difficult it is to upset the moral order." London Guardian.


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Full Length, Drama / 3m, 2f / Bare stage This fascinating drama, staged to acclaim in London and New York, has in its cast of characters Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Shelley and Claire Goodwin. The play is about radicalism artistic, political and more. Taking place in Italy, it concerns the characters' various ideas about radical politics and free love. Along the Full Length, Drama / 3m, 2f / Bare stage This fascinating drama, staged to acclaim in London and New York, has in its cast of characters Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Shelley and Claire Goodwin. The play is about radicalism artistic, political and more. Taking place in Italy, it concerns the characters' various ideas about radical politics and free love. Along the way, a number of serious questions are raised, not the least of which is why fervent radicals seem so often to be done in by their reprehensible characters. At the end of the play Byron attends the cremation of Shelley on the beach at Viareggio and delivers a stunning ovation over the pyre: "Burn him. Burn us all. A great big bloody beautiful fire." "Radicalism, artistic defiance, an intellectual rage. These are the virtues celebrated in this extraordinary dream play which begins, as it ends, on a foreign shore." London Financial Times. "A phantasmagoric play. . . . Brenton is celebrating the idea of the committed artist who seeks to stir and provoke sullen, defeated, bourgeois England. At the same time with clear eyed honesty, he shows how difficult it is to upset the moral order." London Guardian.

30 review for Bloody Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mary Pagones

    Unfortunately, the most interesting character--the ghost of Harriet, Shelley's ex-wife--makes only a very small appearance. This play gives a taste of the lives of the Shelleys and Byron, but it feels rather like a presentation of their alleged characters and lacks a true dramatic arc. Probably works better live, although still worth a read and worthy of a revival. I raise my eyebrow how poets in drama can always extensively quote their own work from memory. Unfortunately, the most interesting character--the ghost of Harriet, Shelley's ex-wife--makes only a very small appearance. This play gives a taste of the lives of the Shelleys and Byron, but it feels rather like a presentation of their alleged characters and lacks a true dramatic arc. Probably works better live, although still worth a read and worthy of a revival. I raise my eyebrow how poets in drama can always extensively quote their own work from memory.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Beautiful use of language and some interesting theatrical conventions with split scenes/times etc. But I do wonder how engaging these characters would be to anyone not interested in the historical people they are based on...Any director and actors would have their work cut out for them with it (but then that's sometimes just the thing). Beautiful use of language and some interesting theatrical conventions with split scenes/times etc. But I do wonder how engaging these characters would be to anyone not interested in the historical people they are based on...Any director and actors would have their work cut out for them with it (but then that's sometimes just the thing).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kaila Tacazon

    Gorgeous play. In mixing modern and traditional (early victorian) styles/language/manners, this play is a great example. Also love the use of verse--esp for Percy Bysshe Shelly--and the narrator/outsider view of Polidori. Complex and difficult story, warrants many read-throughs.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Helmick

    One of the most under-rated plays EVER. The writing throughout the whole play reads as if the lines themselves were prettily-written verse, which makes it a beautiful read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Morteza

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brad

  7. 5 out of 5

    Missy

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shem the Penman

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

  10. 4 out of 5

    Caoimhe Gaughan

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marcus

  12. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rezvaneh

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kendall

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paula

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mammad H.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chas

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bloody Byssche

  22. 4 out of 5

    Farzin Souri

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alice Chambers

  24. 5 out of 5

    Imogen

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

  26. 4 out of 5

    Annie Morphew

  27. 5 out of 5

    Louise Pridding

  28. 4 out of 5

    Helen Heaton

  29. 4 out of 5

    Justin

  30. 4 out of 5

    D. BonAnno

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