Hot Best Seller

Progeny

Availability: Ready to download

Nikalys and his sister Kenders grew up living a peaceful life in the quiet farming village of Yellow Mud... until the blistering hot day when they go to the nearby lake for a swim. When they reach the lake, they spy an unknown mage conjure a massive water creature hundreds of feet tall. They watch in horror as the water creature plunges toward their home, apparently drowni Nikalys and his sister Kenders grew up living a peaceful life in the quiet farming village of Yellow Mud... until the blistering hot day when they go to the nearby lake for a swim. When they reach the lake, they spy an unknown mage conjure a massive water creature hundreds of feet tall. They watch in horror as the water creature plunges toward their home, apparently drowning all in its path, including their parents and older brother, Jak. As the only survivors, brother and sister strike out on their own, hoping to discover the reason their home and family was destroyed. They must make their way through a countryside where magic is outlawed, punishable by imprisonment or even death while struggling with the revelation that Kenders has magical abilities herself. Although Kenders can feel and touch the many-colored "strands" of magic she has no idea how to use them until she and Nikalys are attacked by a pack of wolves and Kenders instinctively summons a bolt of lightning, immediately collapsing when the effort drains her of all her energy. From nowhere a giant lynx appears and saves the pair from certain death and then miraculously morphs into his natural self, a seven-foot-tall man. The shape changer's name is Broedi and when the time is right, he reveals to the siblings that he is one of the original White Lions and he recites to them an ancient prophecy that tells of the coming of a new and even more terrible war than the one centuries ago. The evil Gods of Chaos, Strife, and Sorrow and Pain would combine efforts to unite the orcs, gnolls and razorfiends --- normally sworn enemies. The forces of good would be led by two children of other White Lions; those children are Nikalys and Kenders, the Progeny. As brother and sister struggle with the revelation that the only parents they could remember were not their birth parents, some of the Gods and Goddesses were busy setting other events in motion. Others people - strangers at first - would gather and become allies of the Progeny. Together, they were about to be caught up in the greatest conflict the world had ever seen. Ancient, powerful forces still seek the Progeny on their travels, some intent to eliminate the threat they pose, some hoping to help them fulfill a destiny of which they are unaware. Myths and legends come to life, whisking the pair along a journey they never could have imagined possible.


Compare

Nikalys and his sister Kenders grew up living a peaceful life in the quiet farming village of Yellow Mud... until the blistering hot day when they go to the nearby lake for a swim. When they reach the lake, they spy an unknown mage conjure a massive water creature hundreds of feet tall. They watch in horror as the water creature plunges toward their home, apparently drowni Nikalys and his sister Kenders grew up living a peaceful life in the quiet farming village of Yellow Mud... until the blistering hot day when they go to the nearby lake for a swim. When they reach the lake, they spy an unknown mage conjure a massive water creature hundreds of feet tall. They watch in horror as the water creature plunges toward their home, apparently drowning all in its path, including their parents and older brother, Jak. As the only survivors, brother and sister strike out on their own, hoping to discover the reason their home and family was destroyed. They must make their way through a countryside where magic is outlawed, punishable by imprisonment or even death while struggling with the revelation that Kenders has magical abilities herself. Although Kenders can feel and touch the many-colored "strands" of magic she has no idea how to use them until she and Nikalys are attacked by a pack of wolves and Kenders instinctively summons a bolt of lightning, immediately collapsing when the effort drains her of all her energy. From nowhere a giant lynx appears and saves the pair from certain death and then miraculously morphs into his natural self, a seven-foot-tall man. The shape changer's name is Broedi and when the time is right, he reveals to the siblings that he is one of the original White Lions and he recites to them an ancient prophecy that tells of the coming of a new and even more terrible war than the one centuries ago. The evil Gods of Chaos, Strife, and Sorrow and Pain would combine efforts to unite the orcs, gnolls and razorfiends --- normally sworn enemies. The forces of good would be led by two children of other White Lions; those children are Nikalys and Kenders, the Progeny. As brother and sister struggle with the revelation that the only parents they could remember were not their birth parents, some of the Gods and Goddesses were busy setting other events in motion. Others people - strangers at first - would gather and become allies of the Progeny. Together, they were about to be caught up in the greatest conflict the world had ever seen. Ancient, powerful forces still seek the Progeny on their travels, some intent to eliminate the threat they pose, some hoping to help them fulfill a destiny of which they are unaware. Myths and legends come to life, whisking the pair along a journey they never could have imagined possible.

30 review for Progeny

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rachel's Book Reviews

    Progeny by R.T. Kaelin Synopsis from the back cover- “Nikalys and his sister Kenders grew up living a peaceful life in the quiet farming village of Yellow Mud…until one blistering hot summer day when they went to the nearby lake for a swim. When they reached the lake, they saw and unknown mage conjure a massive water creature hundreds of feet tall. They watched in horror as the monstrous creation plunged toward their home, apparently drowning all in its path, including their parents and older br Progeny by R.T. Kaelin Synopsis from the back cover- “Nikalys and his sister Kenders grew up living a peaceful life in the quiet farming village of Yellow Mud…until one blistering hot summer day when they went to the nearby lake for a swim. When they reached the lake, they saw and unknown mage conjure a massive water creature hundreds of feet tall. They watched in horror as the monstrous creation plunged toward their home, apparently drowning all in its path, including their parents and older brother, Jak. As the only survivors, brother and sister strike out on their own, hoping to discover the reason their home and family was destroyed. They must make their way through a countryside where magic is outlawed, punishable by imprisonment or even death, while struggling with the revelation that Kenders has magical abilities herself. Ancient, powerful forces seek them on their travels- some intending to eliminate the threat they pose, and some hoping to help them fulfill a destiny of which they are unaware. Myths and Legends come to life, whisking the pair along a journey they never could have imagined possible.” This book was the hardest book I have ever read. Not in the good way either. You may have read my review for ‘Allon’ by Shawn Lamb, I mentioned that it had a unique style that would be most appreciated by experienced readers. This is totally different. To be blunt, this was a major waste of my time. Tons of reviewers have given it good reviews (haven’t seen one below five stars yet.) I don’t see where they get ‘almost as good as the Chronicles of Narnia.’ I suppose it’s all up to opinion. The syntax was muddled, and the content was constantly redundant. I would sometimes have to re-read ENTIRE paragraphs to understand what was going on. Or, one of my favorite mishaps was learning that after four pages that the view had switched to a completely new character in a completely different place. I almost felt physically exhausted after reading it. I would stop after about twenty pages and do something else (within the course of one hundred pages, I read four other books), it was sucking the energy right out of me. I really do not like being a negative person, but I couldn’t find anything positive. Cussing was a medium amount and I would definitely not recommend this book. (After reading the book, I read the back synopsis and realized there are five grammatical errors, I corrected them in this review.)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Bought the book on my nook app on IPad......felt like I couldn't put the book down, had free time at work and then the next morning almost read the book.....yes....all 747 pages that were in it, in less then 13 hours. Not entirely sure what people were talking about that gave the book low ratings, thought the chapters were well thought out and hardly noticed any errors in the book, and IMO I'm glad the book was longer....lately, I've been disappointed with books that are to short to fill in all t Bought the book on my nook app on IPad......felt like I couldn't put the book down, had free time at work and then the next morning almost read the book.....yes....all 747 pages that were in it, in less then 13 hours. Not entirely sure what people were talking about that gave the book low ratings, thought the chapters were well thought out and hardly noticed any errors in the book, and IMO I'm glad the book was longer....lately, I've been disappointed with books that are to short to fill in all the gaps in a story Here's to hoping the story continues with another great book soon

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michelle (Clover Hill Book Reviews)

    This book knocked my socks off! I highly recommend it - this review is also on my blog. The cover on this symbolizes the essence of the story, the White Lions, a select few originally chosen by the gods to defend and maintain balance, fighting evil in its many guises, including those that incarnate (e.g. God of Deception), among many. From the first chapter I was completely hooked. I was drawn into a community where magic is outlawed, and had just met Nikalys and his sister Kenders, before being This book knocked my socks off! I highly recommend it - this review is also on my blog. The cover on this symbolizes the essence of the story, the White Lions, a select few originally chosen by the gods to defend and maintain balance, fighting evil in its many guises, including those that incarnate (e.g. God of Deception), among many. From the first chapter I was completely hooked. I was drawn into a community where magic is outlawed, and had just met Nikalys and his sister Kenders, before being immersed into an utterly devastating event for their community, which sees their village being destroyed and the probability of their family having died as a result. Nikalys and Kenders are hurtled into an unknown fate, as they put distance between themselves and the incredibly powerful (but outlawed) magic which they were the witnesses and survivors of. This novel is a fantasy about family, legacies, strengths, coming of age and also magical powers..."the strands". Anyone who enjoys adventure stories or magical and paranormal I would suggest you give this a try. For me, Progeny is in league with both The Chronicles of Narnia and Lord of the Rings and far better than Harry Potter - Progeny has a wealth of depth to it that I haven't seen in many books. Progeny has many layers of stories within its pages, and I found it totally awe inspiring as a read, with each character that is developed really coming to life and adding weight to the story telling. It's hard for me to pick a favorite character to be honest, as they were all of a fantastic quality. We get to see flaws, weaknesses and the loathsomeness in the most evil characters of the plot. The Sun Elf is exceptionally evil and self centered, leaving both chaos and death in his wake, I loved some of his creations which added to his dastardly deeds. Broedi is a strong, relaxed and fairly easy going character who oozes control with a mindset of a protector and true friend. Nundle the Halfling is a joy to read about. I loved the way a character of such small stature could make such a big difference - not only do we get to see him as he rises from being under the thumb of a horrible teacher, we see him in a setting which he deserves to be part of with his magical talents. The progressions of both Nikalys and Kenders if fascinating, alongside that of their friends. There's also a wealth of villages and backdrops which characters are either from, pass through or end up at, all of which have their own story which we also see and become part of as the story continues. Progeny is well paced, and seamlessly weaves lots of stories and characters without effort or flaw. My favorite quote from Progeny: "I feel like an arrow. For thirty-six years, I remained inside a quiver. Now suddenly, I've been shot and am flying through the air, trying to glimpse and grasp everything as it all rushes past." I thoroughly enjoyed the build up to the last couple of chapters. We are left knowing that there is more to come, so I hope Sabine makes her mind up, and that it's clarified in the next book if Eliza and Aryn Atticus are no longer living - this was hinted at, but not confirmed. I loved the idea of the gods aiding and making pacts behind closed doors on either sides, and I also loved the use of "the strands"...the use of magic...for me reminiscent of a dvd which I adore for its use of T'ai Chi & energy working -The Last Airbender. For all of its 650+ pages, Progeny is the biggest book I've read for a while - however it is also substantial in content and storyline. I've enjoyed it immensely from start to finish and am really looking forward to whatever happens next - it's sure to be good after the high bar R.T. Kaelin has made with Progeny. A highly recommended read, this is a great story of epic proportions, which I would love to see this as a film. My only question now is...when can we expect the next one?!

  4. 5 out of 5

    T.Y. Lee

    What in the Nine Hells made me check out this book, after I groaned out loud when I read the mechanical plot synopsis on the back? This was like a D&D campaign turned into a book. (That is not a compliment). The story itself was a bit too generic and formulaic, like one gigantic stereotype (if you read about it in any other fantasy fiction book ever, you'll read it here too), and the plot was extremely predictable. The one unique element I enjoyed was the "weaving of the strands" and the history What in the Nine Hells made me check out this book, after I groaned out loud when I read the mechanical plot synopsis on the back? This was like a D&D campaign turned into a book. (That is not a compliment). The story itself was a bit too generic and formulaic, like one gigantic stereotype (if you read about it in any other fantasy fiction book ever, you'll read it here too), and the plot was extremely predictable. The one unique element I enjoyed was the "weaving of the strands" and the history surrounding the magic. That was the only time I felt like the author wasn't plagiarizing from the genre, and I felt his own voice come through. He has the beginnings of a great storyteller if he could only stray a little from the cliches of this genre. The writing was a bit weak as well. I didn't want to be overwhelmed in grandiloquent flowery prose, but 658 pages of matter-of-fact straightforward descriptions of fantastic places made the writing flat and dry. I didn't feel the awe or grandeur, because simply stating, "His face was full of awe" does little to translate that awe to the reader. The repetition of "What in the Nine Hells...?" got really old, really fast. Yes, I get it. There is a different theism here. Nearly every character thought or spoke the above when startled. It was like reading a book where the characters are constantly saying, "OMG WTF dude?" That repetition also assisted in making the already bland stereotypical characters bleed together and overlap. Even the main characters were remarkably interchangeable, as their purported quirks really didn't manifest themselves frequently, in spite of the author's constant way of trying to point it out through remarks from the Hillman ("She's so rash, just like her mother", in reaction to something I would barely call "rash"). The character dialogue seemed so manufactured and contrived, lacking aspect or flavor, and revealed how little... character... they actually had (with the exception of Nundle). Even the foremost villain, Jhaell, was incredibly static and lacked any believable dimension. He was such a generic "bad guy". Here is an excerpt to demonstrate what I mean: "He had only observed the village for part of the morning, but what he had seen disgusted him. The lessers here had happily gone about their daily lives, working hard to tend the land around them. They seemed strangely content with what little they had. It had sickened Jhaell." The main villain simply hated happiness, because he was THAT evil (you can't see it, but I'm rolling my eyes). You can probably imagine what the heroes of the story were like. Simply put, the characters were BORING. I was really hoping the actual storytelling would redeem the book, but the writing was so conventional and ordinary. I actually caught several writing errors (mostly in the form of omitted words). You know a story is dull when you catch yourself proof-reading. The story was so intentionally truncated at the end, and that last "battle" was merely a speed bump in the road that we traveled hundreds of miles to get to, at 2 mph, thinking it was going to be some cosmic fate-altering ordeal. Predictably, the author is planning on writing a series, so not only did I trudge through 658 pages of mechanical writing and tired plot devices, but I also don't have the satisfaction of getting to the real ending. The reason I gave this book 2 stars instead of 1 is because I did feel compelled enough to FINISH reading the book, so there must have been something in the writing or the story that drew me in, even if it was only false hope.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Presley

    Original review posted here. I don’t normally read and review self-published books, but when Mr. Kaelin contacted me with the pitch for Progeny (and after seeing numerous five star reviews – and a few one star) I decided to give this one a go. My package arrived complete with Progeny bookmark and business cards and a bright, shiny, HUGE book. Overall, I was not disappointed by Progeny. On a scale of 1-5 I’d give it a solid 3 1/2 stars. There were things that needed fixing, but there were some mast Original review posted here. I don’t normally read and review self-published books, but when Mr. Kaelin contacted me with the pitch for Progeny (and after seeing numerous five star reviews – and a few one star) I decided to give this one a go. My package arrived complete with Progeny bookmark and business cards and a bright, shiny, HUGE book. Overall, I was not disappointed by Progeny. On a scale of 1-5 I’d give it a solid 3 1/2 stars. There were things that needed fixing, but there were some masterful parts of the story as well and, let’s face it, it’s hard work writing a high fantasy novel the size and length of this one. In a way, Kaelin’s magic system reminded me of Brandon Sanderson. It was thrilling, unique and very interesting and came across as well thought out. A thorough explanation provided in the story, as well as an Appendix, helped with grasping its intricacies as well as made certain parts of the story even more astounding. I think that the magic system was the best part of this book and will be enough to keep me reading to see if Kaelin has made improvements to the style of the story in Book 2. So what needed improvements? The length. It was much too long, and much of that was travel time, endless repeating of the background of the characters (we know most of it, we don’t need to hear it retold), some editing errors here and there (pg 627, second to last paragraph for example), and the pace was just too slow. It is possible to give the illusion of time passing without spelling out the endless meals, talks and flirting? of the characters with one another. I felt as if there was this huge story just simmering beneath, this massive conflict, but the book gave me 500 pages of set-up with very little actual action that fit with the storyline. And I don’t even want to talk about the history that came with the introduction of the character Nundle (whom I loved, the history lesson.. I did not). That soon into the story, when the reader is so overwhelmed with everything, it just induces yawns and made me want to skip over the whole thing. But I did love the characters! I found Nundle to be perfectly cast, given that he’s a halfling. I found Broedi to be intimidating and comforting at the same time. I’m harboring a bit of a crush on Sargeant Trell, and I loved seeing Zecus come into his own. Sabine was a bit of an annoying distraction, I have to admit, but the addition of Helene made for some great comedic moments. And most of all, the siblings. I found the bond between Jak, Nik and Kenders to be tightly woven and I admit to even shedding a tear now and then when circumstances and fate seemed to want to play with them more than was necessary. Overall, Progeny is a promising beginning for R.T. Kaelin, and I’ll be looking for his second book, with the hopes that some of the things I’ve talked about here will be addressed. I’m sure he’s heard them from more than me – and as this was his first venture, it shows great promise!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Uriah

    I first heard about this book when it was listed as a first reads giveaway. As an avid devourer of fantasy books I signed up to win and didn't think much of it beyond that. I was surprised when the author contacted me a few days later and invited me to join a sub forumn about the group where we could ask questions and discuss the book. I could tell that this was an autor who was passionate about his story and wanted it to succeed. This piqued my curiosity and I went and read the intro to the sto I first heard about this book when it was listed as a first reads giveaway. As an avid devourer of fantasy books I signed up to win and didn't think much of it beyond that. I was surprised when the author contacted me a few days later and invited me to join a sub forumn about the group where we could ask questions and discuss the book. I could tell that this was an autor who was passionate about his story and wanted it to succeed. This piqued my curiosity and I went and read the intro to the story. I could tell then that he author had good reason to be enthusiastic, this was not your run of the mill fantasy. I crossed my fingers to win a first reads copy but knew that if I didn't, I would purchase one on my own, which I ended up doing. The world presented in Progeny is an evocative mix of the normal and the supernatural. I found myself easily slipping into the world and capable of seeing it as they did. The settings are imaginative yet grounded in the possible. The people of this world are "people" instead of falling into racial stereotypes. The characters are visibly but not fatally flawed(in a good way), giving them depth and evoking emotion. All this combines to present a recognizable world in an extraordinary setting. A couple of the things I like most in the book are the magic system and the sense of history. The magic is understandable but also invisible. You see people using it but your imagination must fill in the details. While parts of the language may remind of other books, the use is obviously original. The history and interplay between nationalities and nations is also rich and well executed. Part of me can't decide wether I would rather see the next book or a prequel. The sense of history is not only apparent in exposition but also in the settings and interplay. The book is well written. The first couple of chapters are the roughest but then it falls into an easy rythem. It was a pleasure to read. I won't give any spoilers here but he plot does twist at times. The development of the characters is obvious and real as are their relationships. I hope we do not need to wait long to see another installment in this series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    This book was filled with three dimensional characters; there are no perfect good guys or one dimensional bad guys, just people with strengths and flaws like any person you would meet on the street. Over the course of the book, they started to feel like friends. The world felt similarly real too. The history of the world could be seen in the current political climate and events. The system of magic was original and well-thought out. Add to that a plot that sucks you in and keeps you reading far i This book was filled with three dimensional characters; there are no perfect good guys or one dimensional bad guys, just people with strengths and flaws like any person you would meet on the street. Over the course of the book, they started to feel like friends. The world felt similarly real too. The history of the world could be seen in the current political climate and events. The system of magic was original and well-thought out. Add to that a plot that sucks you in and keeps you reading far into the night, and you have a book that is a real pleasure to read. I'm already looking forward to the next installment in the story of the Progeny and their friends and family.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Madbuzz

    Reading the book reminded me of Lord of the Rings and The Wheel of Time books in the fact that it was a large world, there were similar, but different races, and it wasn't a simple "hack and slash" novel, but rather an interesting story line. There were certain events in the book that were predictable, and others that I hadn't expected. I really found how magic worked in Progeny to be different but interesting. I found the reading to be easy, it flowed well, and kept my attention. There are few Reading the book reminded me of Lord of the Rings and The Wheel of Time books in the fact that it was a large world, there were similar, but different races, and it wasn't a simple "hack and slash" novel, but rather an interesting story line. There were certain events in the book that were predictable, and others that I hadn't expected. I really found how magic worked in Progeny to be different but interesting. I found the reading to be easy, it flowed well, and kept my attention. There are few authors who will eat up the majority of my time (15 minute break at work, while waiting in line at the store, etc.), and R.T. Kaelin is one of them.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Betty-Anne

    Without a doubt, R. T. Kaelin’s Progeny goes on my list of high fantasy to be re-read. With the number of books currently competing for my attention, that is saying a lot. At first glance, it seems that Kaelin has written a formulaic quest-type fantasy story. He has elves, mages, orcs and Halflings, a sword and magic. I’ve seen all of these elements appear in stories before. The thing is, I still read many of them, because I’m always looking for one thing I want above all else when I read fantasy Without a doubt, R. T. Kaelin’s Progeny goes on my list of high fantasy to be re-read. With the number of books currently competing for my attention, that is saying a lot. At first glance, it seems that Kaelin has written a formulaic quest-type fantasy story. He has elves, mages, orcs and Halflings, a sword and magic. I’ve seen all of these elements appear in stories before. The thing is, I still read many of them, because I’m always looking for one thing I want above all else when I read fantasy. That one thing is story – and without a doubt, Kaelin delivers. Teenagers Nikalys and his sister Kenders live in a country where magic is outlawed and viewed as something to be feared. When they witness an act of magic that ultimately destroys their tiny village, along with their parents and all the people they know and love, they are forced to leave the only home they’ve ever known. Along with their older brother Jak, they undertake a journey that begins with the intention of finding the elf responsible for the destruction of their home. Meetings with several different persons, almost from the start cause Nikalys and Kenders to find out more about a destiny that had been hidden from them. Much more is at stake than they could ever have believed. Progeny is the story of the first step to them becoming who they were meant to be. Let me backtrack a little however. I have actually read two different versions of this book. The first version (which I received from the author) was longer, but had fewer chapters. There was more setup before the action, and a somewhat slower pacing. The second version I read is the one that’s now available for purchase. It has an entirely different prologue, almost twice as many chapters … but is actually a shorter book. I was so impressed with the level of storytelling in the original version that I simply had to have the new version, even if it meant that I was basically reading the same book again. I wanted not only to see what had changed, but to know whether Kaelin actually did a better job on the story than the first time around. The changes made the story move along much more quickly. The shorter chapters in particular added a welcome level of tension that resulted in a tighter, more exciting book. I became quickly caught up in the characters’ lives – not only Nikalys and Kenders, but also Broedi, Zecus and especially Nundle – and with each page, wanted to know what was happening with them next. By the ending, I was satisfied with where the story had gone and how the first level of resolution had taken place. This is an excellent fantasy that you will find yourself wanting to share when you’re done. Like me, I think you’ll be anxiously awaiting the second book in the series. In the meantime, however, Kaelin also has a series of four collections of short stories which expand on the world created in Progeny. These are also an excellent read, and helped feed the addiction just a little.

  10. 4 out of 5

    CorLostForWords

    Source: Received from author. Many thanks goes to R.T. Kaelin for sending me a copy of his book for review. I received this book free of charge in exchange for an honest review. My rating: 5/5 Nikalys and Kenders have a monumental destiny thrust on them when they find themselves watching a water monster, created by magic, ravage and destroy their small town. With everyone and everything they had ever known wiped out on one sunny, hazy afternoon, they are left desperate and alone. Past consoling, Source: Received from author. Many thanks goes to R.T. Kaelin for sending me a copy of his book for review. I received this book free of charge in exchange for an honest review. My rating: 5/5 Nikalys and Kenders have a monumental destiny thrust on them when they find themselves watching a water monster, created by magic, ravage and destroy their small town. With everyone and everything they had ever known wiped out on one sunny, hazy afternoon, they are left desperate and alone. Past consoling, they move on, as they try to figure out why this happened, and how they can avenge the deaths of so many innocent people. What they don't realize, is that this is the first step to unveiling their legacy, and destiny, and they will meet many who will stand with them, and partake of the journey ahead. I don't think I can do this book justice. Honestly, Progeny is right up my alley. It is one of those reads that just sucked me in and wouldn't let me go. Progeny is an exceptional read. The characters are well-defined, and I immediately found myself invested in their story. Kenders, Nikalys, and Jak, as well as their parents are so approachable, and credible. I found myself connecting to them almost immediately. I rooted for them throughout the story, and hoped that things would turn out for them, even in the face of tragedy. The world-building is absolutely amazing, and from the beginning the read is intense. We're thrown into a world where magic is outlawed and feared, yet it is still practiced behind closed doors. Along the way we meet a host of colourful characters, including Broedi, and Nundle. They all add to the read, as does the villainous Preceptor, Jhaell Myrr. Fantasy is one of my favourite genres to read, and when it is done right, it will keep me coming back for more. Progeny is absolutely done right. Between the world-building, and the character-building, I was thoroughly enthralled. I found myself reading and re-reading every page, devouring the words, all the while savouring them as I did not want to miss a single thing. Even within reading the first few pages, I knew this one would be a favourite read and re-read of mine. It is an absolutely phenomenal, and prolific read. I want the next book now! R.T. Kaelin has penned an exceptionally exquisite first novel, and I'll be waiting with bated breath for the rest of this series, as well as any of his future works not tied to the series. All in all, this is certainly a read you will want to savour. Between the characters, and the world enticing you in, you won't want to put Progeny down. It has crossover appeal for both teens and adults alike. Kaelin has a way with words that fully immerses the reader, demanding they invest themselves in the world he has created; much like Terry Goodkind and Christopher Paolini. It is such an explosively amazing book and has made my top reads list for 2011 with ease. I'll be re-visiting it shortly, because it is just that good.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sandie

    Rarely, readers are honored to discover a book that is so entrancing, so fascinating, that they are carried away to another land. Progeny is such a book, and those who read it will be changed by the experience. Nikalys and his sister, Kenders leave their small farm to go swimming for the afternoon. Little do they know their trip will change their lives forever. Returning after their swim, they are horrified to observe a Sun Elf using magic to destroy their village and everyone they have known, in Rarely, readers are honored to discover a book that is so entrancing, so fascinating, that they are carried away to another land. Progeny is such a book, and those who read it will be changed by the experience. Nikalys and his sister, Kenders leave their small farm to go swimming for the afternoon. Little do they know their trip will change their lives forever. Returning after their swim, they are horrified to observe a Sun Elf using magic to destroy their village and everyone they have known, including their parents and brother, Jak. They flee, unsure what to do or why their village has been targeted. Fearful, they are unwilling to trust anyone, but find themselves in the company of a giant man who somehow wins their trust. This man, Broedi reveals much to them as they travel. He reminds them of the story underlying their society, that of the White Lions who came together to save humanity when the God of Chaos decided to destroy the world. The ancient stories that tell of the White Lions also foretell of new heroes that will emerge when the world needs them--the Progeny. Nikalys and Kenders are shocked to find that Broedi is one of the White Lions and a Shapeshifter, but totally disoriented when they come to realise that they are the Progeny of the legends. For Chaos is again making an attempt to destroy all that is known. As they determine to fight the forces of evil, their group is joined by others. Wonderfully, they discover that Jak has somehow escaped the carnage that destroyed the village and is able to join them. A Halfling with magic powers becomes one of the band. A company of soldiers that is sent by the Sun Elf to find and destroy them instead become part of the group. They save a family out on the remote plains, and the surviving members of that family also start to travel with them. Together, this small band must attempt to fight the overwhelming forces of evil that are determined to destroy everything they hold dear. Robert Jordan. George R. R. Martin. Stephen Donaldon. Brandon Sanderson. These are the masters of fantasy and readers of Progeny will be able to discover a new voice that is destined to match those authors. R.T. Kaelin has created a complex world that his original and creative storytelling manages to make realistic and believable. The characters are fresh and engaging. While the story of good versus evil and a band who comes together to fight overwhelming odds is a staple of the fantasy genre, Kaelin manages to make it seem new again. He draws the reader along marveling at the story that unfolds and willing to go wherever he leads. The book is very highly recommended for all readers, and especially for fantasy fans. When the last page is read, readers are left satisfied, fulfilled and impatient for the next book in the series.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Diane Kistner

    In this impressive first novel by R. T. Kaelin, we are introduced to the White Lions—champions-in-hiding from an ancient war against one of the nine evil gods, Chaos—and a prophecy only partially come to pass. With assistance this time from other gods in the evil cabal, Chaos is rising again, "unraveling what has been made." It now falls to the children of the mysterious White Lions and those who aid and befriend them to rise up and fight—as the prophecy tells, to "seek to make it right." When I In this impressive first novel by R. T. Kaelin, we are introduced to the White Lions—champions-in-hiding from an ancient war against one of the nine evil gods, Chaos—and a prophecy only partially come to pass. With assistance this time from other gods in the evil cabal, Chaos is rising again, "unraveling what has been made." It now falls to the children of the mysterious White Lions and those who aid and befriend them to rise up and fight—as the prophecy tells, to "seek to make it right." When I picked up the advance uncorrected proof of "Progeny," I was soon swept up into a world so large, and a tale so relentless, that I could not put it down. The plot flows as strongly as a waterfall but manages to pace itself and keep the reader guessing. The disparate characters we meet along the way are intriguing and richly nuanced, reminding one of Tolkien's without being derivative. Although good is classically pitted against evil in this tale, there are few black-and-white characters here. (Interestingly, in the pantheon of 33 gods and goddesses listed in the Appendix, nine are good, nine are evil, and the rest are "neither.") We find terror and confusion, petulance and pettiness—but also patience, humor, compassion, and the will to grow into one's best potential. With one vividly nasty exception, even the "bad guys" sometimes "do good." The concept, I am told, of "weaving the strands" came to the author in a dream. We learn that most mages in "Progeny" can see and touch but a few of the nine strands of magic, and a rare few can touch all nine. Some who cannot see certain strands can still recognize their absence and guess at how the magical patterns might have been made. The author himself is adept at weaving: legend and modernity, numerology and alchemy, democracy and psychology, shamanism and string theory—and much more—shimmer through the patterns of this tale. Astute readers will bring their own instincts and insight to "Progeny," rewarded for their effort by no less than a heightening of their own consciousness of themselves and the world around them. I am struck by the similarities between the prodigious young Kenders learning to weave the strands of magic—sometimes clumsily but always extraordinarily—and the way Kaelin weaves his story. This is a big book and a big world, surprisingly well conceived for a first novel. Although there are errors in the proof I read that a light editorial gloss should fix, the writing as a whole is strong and engaging. At the end of its 662 pages, the larger story for which the stage is set in "Progeny" has only just begun. Many books (not to mention movies and video games) could be spun from the magical foundational pattern R. T. Kaelin has woven in "Progeny." I very much look forward to the next book in the series, and I strongly encourage Mr. Kaelin to keep writing.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Nikalys and Kenders Isaac have lived a simple life as children of a farmer in the town of Yellow Mud. When a summer day leads them away from their village, they never predicted that it would also save their lives. From a distance, the two witness the magical destruction of their town - including their friends and family - by a mysterious elf and several robed figures. After watching the terrifying encounter, the two siblings flee. Magic has always been outlawed in their home, but even more start Nikalys and Kenders Isaac have lived a simple life as children of a farmer in the town of Yellow Mud. When a summer day leads them away from their village, they never predicted that it would also save their lives. From a distance, the two witness the magical destruction of their town - including their friends and family - by a mysterious elf and several robed figures. After watching the terrifying encounter, the two siblings flee. Magic has always been outlawed in their home, but even more startling than seeing it destroy their lives is the discovery of unique powers within themselves. Setting out to notify the authorities, Kenders and Nikalys soon cross paths with a giant of a man named Broedi. Possessing the rare talent of shapeshifting, he is a fortunate ally who holds the secrets to their past - as well as their future. Progeny by R.T. Kaelin is a stunning work of epic fantasy. The story is wonderfully told and full of action and adventure. Along with the Isaac siblings and their large companion, the book is populated with well-developed characters. The story lines are beautifully woven together and each new multi-dimensional hero or villain that is introduced adds a new layer of perspective to the tale. These characters flourish in the the expansive fantasy landscape that Kaelin has created. A single village or kingdom is not enough to contain the story, so the setting is an entire nation with multiple terrains, laws, races, and cultures. Along with a pantheon of gods - good, neutral, and evil - the story refers to seasons, history, education, politics, ancient prophecy, customs, and legends of the land, all of which contribute to bringing the world to life. The universe also contains a richly detailed and unique system of magic. The system is built upon the concept of Strands - nine of them, each with a unique color and property - and those with a gift for magic wield it by weaving together the types of Strands they are able to use. Some users can control multiple types such as fire, air, water; some can only touch a few; others have no knowledge of magic at all; while some can sense it but not use it. Cleverly conceived and expertly crafted, Kaelin demonstrates great talent as a writer with this work. The grand scale world-building, rarely seen in a debut novel, is on par with current greats of the genre such as Brandon Sanderson and Jim Butcher. Though it nears seven hundred pages long, the epilogue comes far too soon; but the story holds great promise for future adventures in the series. Overall, Progeny is a fantastic book! It is appropriate for young adults or fans of high fantasy of any age. While it does tell a succinct story, it will definitely leave readers eagerly anticipating its sequel!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tina Peterson

    Progeny is the debut novel of a brand new author who visions that this story will take place in a series of books (he's thinking 5 at this time). Fast moving, engrossing and action packed you will find yourself feeling like you are part of the landscape as you follow the characters through a story with much depth. This is story of a planet (Terrene), several different races, magic, the paranormal and a prophecy by the "gods" involving young adults Nikalys, Kenders and Jak and the race to save an Progeny is the debut novel of a brand new author who visions that this story will take place in a series of books (he's thinking 5 at this time). Fast moving, engrossing and action packed you will find yourself feeling like you are part of the landscape as you follow the characters through a story with much depth. This is story of a planet (Terrene), several different races, magic, the paranormal and a prophecy by the "gods" involving young adults Nikalys, Kenders and Jak and the race to save and make the world a better place. The story opens with a cataclysmic event that starts our 3 main characters on the journey of a lifetime. As that journey continues we meet many different characters that play a specific purpose throughout the story and have a strong influence on the decisions that Nikalys, Kenders and Jak make. RT Kaelin has taken the time to think through his storyline, he has created a history and personality for each of the characters and I'm sure as the books are published we will find that each has their own individual story "behind the main story". I found the book to immediately capture my attention since as you know I am a BIG Lord of the Rings fan. I found the author carefully planned out the topography, the language, the poetry, the events and the battles just like Tolkien did and I think that is partly why I loved the book so much - the nice thing about RT Kaelin's writing though is that I didn't have to concentrate as much to keep the events straight, the language used by the writer made it very easy to follow along and wasn't "difficult" like Tolkien's was. You will find the elves, the dwarves, the longlegs (the race of men), there are the magician's (I took them as warlocks almost), the orcs and the halflings. In addition, Kaelin has added the soulwraiths (similar to the black wraiths mentioned in LOTR), the razor fiends, the demons and bullockboars, One thing that caught my attention is the choices that those on the wrong side and those on the good side make that has an effect on future events for themselves and the world. I would give this book 5 stars! I personally would suggest this book for young adults 15/16 on up due to the dark nature of the magic and feeling I got of the soulwraiths, demons and warlocks being possessed (you'll see what I mean when you read the book). I am definitely looking forward to Book 2!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lis Ann - The Indigo Quill

    Read Original Review @ The Indigo Quill: http://theindigoquill.blogspot.com/20... Progeny is one of those books you see made into a movie. It's a story that captures the reader and doesn't let them go, not even at the final page. If you enjoyed the Chronicles of Narnia or the works of Paolini then you will most definitely enjoy Progeny. As YA Fantasy novels go, this is one of those that leaves me impressed and wanting for more. You can tell that R.T. Kaelin took his time to develop his story and Read Original Review @ The Indigo Quill: http://theindigoquill.blogspot.com/20... Progeny is one of those books you see made into a movie. It's a story that captures the reader and doesn't let them go, not even at the final page. If you enjoyed the Chronicles of Narnia or the works of Paolini then you will most definitely enjoy Progeny. As YA Fantasy novels go, this is one of those that leaves me impressed and wanting for more. You can tell that R.T. Kaelin took his time to develop his story and characters to give them dimension and bring them to life. A quality I find that good authors share is the ability to make their stories come alive, where it becomes so real to them they offer the reader more to explore outside of their book (i.e. J.K. Rowling writing "Quidditch Through The Ages and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them or J.R. Tolkein's Middle Earth). Kaelin does exactly this. Not only has he written a hefty book full of depth and plot, but from exploring his website and receiving sources from him myself, I see that he has taken his story and breathed life into it. So if you couldn't tell, I loved this book. I loved the magic, the drama, the characters, the twists and the mystery. It has all of those elements in one. Usually when I start a book I have to keep telling myself, "just get through the first few chapters, they always get better after that." Not here. I loved that you hit the ground running on the very first page. As you travel through the story with the main characters, you find yourself searching for answers along with them, turning the pages so you can journey onto the next moment with them. 5 stars, and I can't wait to read the next installment!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tad

    I was fortunate to win this book in a first-reads giveaway. Very entertaining epic fantasy. The world-building and system of magic are impressive. The heroes are easy to root for and identify with. After seeing their village destroyed by an evil mage in a land where magic is outlawed, brother and sister Nikalys and Kenders flee, leaving behind the only life they have known. As they journey towards a fate greater than either of them imagined lay in store for them, they assembly a group of allies I was fortunate to win this book in a first-reads giveaway. Very entertaining epic fantasy. The world-building and system of magic are impressive. The heroes are easy to root for and identify with. After seeing their village destroyed by an evil mage in a land where magic is outlawed, brother and sister Nikalys and Kenders flee, leaving behind the only life they have known. As they journey towards a fate greater than either of them imagined lay in store for them, they assembly a group of allies to help them avenge what they have lost and begin to prepare for the battle that lies in front of them. Along the way they discover that much of what they thought they knew about their world is wrong and that they have a great destiny. The siblings and their friends are well written characters that you want to watch grow. Nundle in particular is a highly entertaining individual that I'm looking forward to seeing more of. The world is expansive and lends itself to much further exploration. The villain of the story is written a little thinly. Openly and exaggeratedly cruel, he simply doesn't have the same character depth as the heroes. Sometimes his over-the-top actions were a little too much to believe and jarred you out of the story for a bit. I have higher hopes, though, for some of the villains that were introduced in this book but that I expect will have a greater role in subsequent novels. All in all, a very good story that is entertaining in its own right and will leave you curious as to what happens next.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    R.T. Kaelin has begun a new phenomenon with his debut book, Progeny. Rarely do we see such work come from a new author. The first in a new series, Progeny promises an exhilirating ride. After watching the destruction of their entire village, siblings Jak, Nikalys, and Kenders, soon learn that little they accepted as fact was true while myths turn out to be real. Faced with a new reality and a challenge to fulfill their role in a prophecy, the siblings begin a coming of age journey of self-realiz R.T. Kaelin has begun a new phenomenon with his debut book, Progeny. Rarely do we see such work come from a new author. The first in a new series, Progeny promises an exhilirating ride. After watching the destruction of their entire village, siblings Jak, Nikalys, and Kenders, soon learn that little they accepted as fact was true while myths turn out to be real. Faced with a new reality and a challenge to fulfill their role in a prophecy, the siblings begin a coming of age journey of self-realization. Kaelin's characters are beautifully rich and well developed, as is the history behind the story and the world which he eloquently creates. The use of magic as energy work brings another dimension to the book, accompanied by subtle nuances and deeper underlying topics. Readers will not be disappointed. Fans of Tolkien and Paolini will see a wonderful new spin on a fantastical world which leaves the reader anxiously awaiting the next book in the series. While the copy I read still needed some light editing, that fact couldn't detract from the wonderful writing and story woven within. Disclaimer: A complimentary copy was provided by the author.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    This was a difficult read. The characters are wooden, the dialogue is clumsy and the content repetitive. And if I have to read one more character saying another character's name over and over again during a conversation I will throw my kindle into a wall. People do not speak like this, ever. I'm glad I didn't pay for this book. Also, as a knitter and a weaver the two are not interchangeable. You either weave by bringing yarn (or "strands") over and under the warp, or you knit by looping yarn toge This was a difficult read. The characters are wooden, the dialogue is clumsy and the content repetitive. And if I have to read one more character saying another character's name over and over again during a conversation I will throw my kindle into a wall. People do not speak like this, ever. I'm glad I didn't pay for this book. Also, as a knitter and a weaver the two are not interchangeable. You either weave by bringing yarn (or "strands") over and under the warp, or you knit by looping yarn together with needles. You do not knit a weave. This drove me crazy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    This was super. If you like magic, and big battles. New heroes discovering their power. It did lose a star for editing. At one point one of the character said orcs. This pulled me right out of the story. This tail didn't have orcs. It made me pause to wonder if the big grey bad guys had been called orcs and then the author changed it. It had a few other grammar issues, but what book (or review) doesn't. Overall really great. Really full length. Some of these free kindle books are a little on the This was super. If you like magic, and big battles. New heroes discovering their power. It did lose a star for editing. At one point one of the character said orcs. This pulled me right out of the story. This tail didn't have orcs. It made me pause to wonder if the big grey bad guys had been called orcs and then the author changed it. It had a few other grammar issues, but what book (or review) doesn't. Overall really great. Really full length. Some of these free kindle books are a little on the skimpy side.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Colton Hensarling

    I don't usually write a review for any book, but I just finished reading this for the third time in preparation for the next book (Which I hope comes out soon). Progeny was a great book that had a stunning world and was easy to read and made me never want to put the book down. Kaelin is a great author and I look forward to his next addition to the series. I don't usually write a review for any book, but I just finished reading this for the third time in preparation for the next book (Which I hope comes out soon). Progeny was a great book that had a stunning world and was easy to read and made me never want to put the book down. Kaelin is a great author and I look forward to his next addition to the series.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    Enjoyable new voice in the fantasy genre. Typical plot, but a decently original setting. Would I/Did I buy it? No, borrowed from Amazon, but I'll probably buy it in hard copy Would I read it again? Yes Would I recommend it to friends? Yeah Enjoyable new voice in the fantasy genre. Typical plot, but a decently original setting. Would I/Did I buy it? No, borrowed from Amazon, but I'll probably buy it in hard copy Would I read it again? Yes Would I recommend it to friends? Yeah

  22. 5 out of 5

    Beth Erwin

    Excellent characters, solid story line. Enjoyable. I truly hope there's a sequel or two.....otherwise, I'm going to have to check out some of the author's other work. Excellent characters, solid story line. Enjoyable. I truly hope there's a sequel or two.....otherwise, I'm going to have to check out some of the author's other work.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    DISCLAIMER- I DIDN'T FINISH THIS BOOK. I stopped at the 2/3 point because I just couldn't take it anymore. But, my original post about Why I couldn't bring myself to finish was originally posted on my blog, Books from Bleh to Basically Amazing. Progeny by R.T. Kaelin is an epic fantasy novel, and honestly, as much as it pains me to admit this, it has reminded me, once again, why I spent years of my childhood blatantly refusing to touch any book labeled fantasy. I'm going to apologize up front, be DISCLAIMER- I DIDN'T FINISH THIS BOOK. I stopped at the 2/3 point because I just couldn't take it anymore. But, my original post about Why I couldn't bring myself to finish was originally posted on my blog, Books from Bleh to Basically Amazing. Progeny by R.T. Kaelin is an epic fantasy novel, and honestly, as much as it pains me to admit this, it has reminded me, once again, why I spent years of my childhood blatantly refusing to touch any book labeled fantasy. I'm going to apologize up front, because I don't really have anything nice to say about this book. I'm going to try really, really hard not to get mean, but I'm going to be honest about what I thought of what I did read, and why I just honestly couldn't bring myself to finish the last third of the book. I started this book, knowing that I wasn't in the mood for it. It's high, epic fantasy, something I don't read a lot of, and right now, I'm definitely wanting to sit back and read Contemporary fiction. But this is a tour book, and I had a deadline, so I picked it up and started reading. And, during the first paragraph, I knew I was going to have problems with the story. That's a terrible thing to say, and I'm aware of that, because it means I haven't really given the story a chance. But, the first line is- "The day was unbearably hot." And then the author spends a whole paragraph explaining the hot. This is why the book is a massive 660 pages, and why I struggled to read it. This is a book that really would have benefited from an editor. And, I'm not talking an editor who reads through your paper to make sure that your grammar, punctuation and spelling is correct. I'm talking about an editor who isn't afraid to tell you that it's not a good idea to use 30 words when 10 will suffice, or to spend 5 pages describing how a boy gets out of a tree. (<-- True story... Really happens) I really struggled reading through this book, because the author is really heavy on the detail, and back story, and side stories, and sub characters and sub plots and he lets you take a peak into every single character's mind. It made the main bad guy we get to 'see' unscary, because really, he's nothing more than a snob who takes his superiority out on people he believes to be less than himself, and he just happens to have the magic to do it on a large scale. I got really tired of him repeating that his nose wrinkled at every movement of a 'lesser' or that he had to force himself to let the weak and sniveling humans live. Sigh. I also didn't care about a single character. I was never interested in their fates, and I found the parts of the book I did read to be quite predictable. Because, while the story itself was quite good, it was also wholly unoriginal and rather unremarkable. It's been done before, many times and I didn't think that this particular version brought anything new to the telling. And honestly, the characters interactions with each other were... weird. And awkward. Their dialogue was unrealistic and their expectations of each other were... off. I don't know exactly how to explain it without giving specific examples from the book, but none of their relationships or communication or interaction actually felt like something that could realistically or believably transpire between people, which only increased my disinterest in them and their story. I managed to get about 2/3 through the book before calling it quits, although I will admit right now that much of that 2/3 ended up being skimmed, because so much of it was, in my opinion, unnecessary and tedious. But I finally decided to give up for two reasons. One, was that the entire reading experience had felt like a chore and I cannot think of one section that was enjoyable to read. But the second reason, and why I finally did decide to give up on it was because the author mentioned he plans to make this a 5 book series. There is no way I'm going to be reading the other books in the series, and it just seemed pointless to waste my time being bored while reading to the end of a story that wasn't even over yet anyway. So, I gave up on the book. Don't let this totally discourage you though. There are a lot of really positive reviews on Goodreads for this book, and I know that one of my good blogger friends read and really enjoyed this one herself. So maybe you will like it. If it sounds like a book you would really enjoy, give it a shot. Epic fantasy definitely has a large and loyal following, so there will be some people out there who love this one.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Meaghan R. (YA-aholic)

    i don't even know where to begin! ★★★★ for the storyline/plot ☆☆☆☆☆ for the writing and grammar (that's 0 stars) I WOULD ONLY RECOMMEND THIS VERSION TO THOSE THAT AREN'T BOTHERED BY INNUMEROUS TYPOS AND GRAMMATICAL ERRORS. i mean, it was reallllllyyyyyyy bad. it started out horrendous. just careless mistakes that any third grader would have been able to catch, and a lot of extra words...like, you could tell that the author went back to change something but didn't delete it in it's entirety...stuff li i don't even know where to begin! ★★★★ for the storyline/plot ☆☆☆☆☆ for the writing and grammar (that's 0 stars) I WOULD ONLY RECOMMEND THIS VERSION TO THOSE THAT AREN'T BOTHERED BY INNUMEROUS TYPOS AND GRAMMATICAL ERRORS. i mean, it was reallllllyyyyyyy bad. it started out horrendous. just careless mistakes that any third grader would have been able to catch, and a lot of extra words...like, you could tell that the author went back to change something but didn't delete it in it's entirety...stuff like: she was that was that....just annoying. it got so bad, i actually wrote directly in the book. not ONE SINGLE page went by that didn't have some kind of error! and what was with the overuse of the word "had" ?!?!?!?! it was like every other word. it would be nice if the author learned some synonyms. many times, it felt like the author had a list of words that he had to use, and couldn't deviate from this set list to write the book. [examples to come] i got super frustrated at time, like, to the point of wanting to strangle someone....yes, i know i have anger issues....however, arounf halfway through the book, the errors/mistakes seemed to decrease in rate. thankfully. don't get me wrong, there was still at least one per page, but no where near as many as in the beginning of the story. unfortunately, this trend didn't continue throughout the book. at around Chapter 38, the mistakes/errors started to pick up again....it was like, he'd just written 600 pages and wanted to get the ending out and be done with it, and in doing so got a little careless. now, i have heard from the author, and the progeny website, that there will be a second edition of this book, with a complete editing overhaul. removed a ton of words, and trust me, pretty near half were unnecessary and made for awkward phrases. As delighted by this that i am, i will not be rereading the story. now, on to the 5 ★ story. and it was, if you can ignore the severely problematic writing, that was amateur at best. absolutely loved the actually story. it was great, unique, and extremely well thought out. there was a plethora of information to absorb in regards to the world of the progeny, the moon cycles and the turns (months) -you could tell the world was greatly envisioned by the author, and he portrayed ti well. -i only hope that the following books don't go into so much detail about stuff that we learned in the first one. such as, the gods and goddesses, the turn cycles, moon cycles, overly descriptive cities and whatnot. [i have VERY detailed notes at home, so a more in-depth review will be coming later] Below was from some point near the beginning of the book: this book is a real struggle to get through. i love the story, but the writing is completely horrendous. it's so bad that it's taking me practically 10 times longer to read! i was just on the website for the book, and there's a large banner -type box on the front that says : big news! a new version of Progeny is available with a never before seen Prologue and "countless edits." -kind of makes me wonder how much different the experience would be if i was reading that one! review to come when i finish the book

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    After getting behind on my book reviews I finally am posting my review for "Progeny" by R.T. Kaelin. I feel like I spent quite a while recently reading outside my comfort zone and this book was no exception. I don't typically pick up high fantasy books, but I met R.T. at a convention less than a year ago and heard him describe his book several times throughout the weekend. By the third day, I had decided that I really wanted to read this book. It turns out that by the time I had worked my way do After getting behind on my book reviews I finally am posting my review for "Progeny" by R.T. Kaelin. I feel like I spent quite a while recently reading outside my comfort zone and this book was no exception. I don't typically pick up high fantasy books, but I met R.T. at a convention less than a year ago and heard him describe his book several times throughout the weekend. By the third day, I had decided that I really wanted to read this book. It turns out that by the time I had worked my way down the book pile to it, he had released a second edition, so this review is actually based on that second edition. The reason I typically don't read high fantasy, is because it usually feels too similar to the big players in the genre (e.g. The Lord of the Rings). Progeny doesn't even come close to feeling similar to any of them. The world that is created in this book is unique, fascinating, and quite rich. The magic system is a new concept, or at least it was to me, and the races or beings are very cool creations unto themselves, except humans, of course! Tombles are the closest thing there is to hearkening back to a traditional high fantasy creature, because they're short like hobbits, but that's the biggest similarity I have seen so far. I can overlook that simply because I love the word tomble. :-) This book was refreshing to me because it was a truly original new world I got to explore. Characterization is very well done in "Progeny". The main characters' personalities are defined pretty early on, and stay consistent throughout. I quite enjoyed watching how the relationships between the siblings had to grow and evolve in reaction to what was happening to them. She was by no means my favorite character, but the character of Sabine who shows up later in the book, was the most intriguing to me. R.T. does a great job of dropping just enough clues to make you uneasy about her but not enough to make you to think bad of her. I think I have to say that Nundle was my favorite character (the tomble, of course). One other thing I took note of was the pacing of the story and, kind of tied into that, the dispensing of the background information. The pacing was right on throughout the book; there's no losing steam halfway through the Dead Marshes in this book! Part of the reason is that the information about the world and its history is broken up into nice bite-sized chunks. Those chunks are sprinkled throughout the book in just the right places. You always know just enough to understand what is going on at the moment but not too much more, just like J.K. Rowling did in Harry Potter. The finished effect of this being done so well is that I looked forward to the background information bits just as much as I looked forward to the action bits. I recommend this book to everyone, really. If you like any kind of adventure story (And who doesn't, really?) then you will enjoy this book. The magic is very logical and has to operate within certain rules, so it might even appeal to science fiction lovers as well. I know it did to me! This is actually the first of the White Lion trilogy, and the second book is in the works. R.T. Kaelin also has some short stories available that take place in the same world.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Washor

    Progeny is the first chapter in what could easily become one of the great high fantasy stories of our time. Plainly said, Progeny is just a lot of fun! This novel sets up a backdrop for a much greater tale than is portrayed in the book – this is not to say the picture painted by this book is not great in and of itself! I can easily see this series becoming a trilogy, tetralogy or more. Terrene, the world in which this story takes place, is rife with elves, men, halflings, giants, orcs, demons, et Progeny is the first chapter in what could easily become one of the great high fantasy stories of our time. Plainly said, Progeny is just a lot of fun! This novel sets up a backdrop for a much greater tale than is portrayed in the book – this is not to say the picture painted by this book is not great in and of itself! I can easily see this series becoming a trilogy, tetralogy or more. Terrene, the world in which this story takes place, is rife with elves, men, halflings, giants, orcs, demons, etc. – all the goodies and baddies that make up high fantasy. They all have their own racial tendencies already familiar to the reader, but the author has not locked his individual characters into these pre-established racial roles. For instance, one of the main bad guys is what I would equate to a “high elf” – a race almost always portrayed as the embodiment of goodness – and he is a real baddie! The world that has been created by Kaelin feels very “clean” to me. There is a highly ordered calendar complete with evenly spaced lunar cycles and seasons. An established pantheon of gods and goddesses walks the world it shares with its followers – remaining withdrawn from society for the most part, but acting in ways unseen until after the effects of its transgressions have passed. Add to this, a logical and beautiful magic system based off of Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series and made original by the author, you have a clean canvas for great works of art to be produced. The story itself is written very well – especially considering this is the author’s own first novel. Sure there are some minor grammatical errors not caught before publishing, however these are few and he does not even have an established publishing house proofing his work before it goes to release. Kaelin is a self published, Indie author! Considering this I give the author a lot of credit for doing such a good job with both the writing and editing before it got to my hands! Multiple plotlines intertwine to develop a rich story that is both enjoyable and quick reading. It was fun to see how the different characters came together and I appreciated the lack of “soap opera tactics” I find in so many books (i.e. characters somehow neglecting to share crucial details with their companions to further a specific bizarre story line that otherwise would have fallen apart before progressing far enough to matter). Instead, Kaelin builds the story in a manner with which real people might react if they were put in a similar situation. All of the characters have their own unique personalities that you will fall in love with and they remain true to their idiosyncrasies throughout the book. You really get a feeling you know a character soon after he or she is introduced to you. You will find yourself associating with their different aspects as the plots develop and come to a harmonious conclusion. I am pleased to give this book five stars and I look forward to the next novel in what I anticipate will be a series on the same level as the Wheel of Time series, The Inheritance Cycle, and the Shannara series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    T.L. Gray

    *Review Published in The West Georgia Living Magazine - Nov/Dec 2012 There are many reasons authors write stories. Sometimes it’s to share a little bit of magic in a practical world. Sometimes it’s cathartic, a release of pent up emotions and hurts that others can identify and share. Sometimes it’s to take a break from the harsh realities and escape in a bit of fantasy. Sometimes it’s a vehicle used to spread a message, a moral code, a bit of wisdom or advice to pass down to the next generation. *Review Published in The West Georgia Living Magazine - Nov/Dec 2012 There are many reasons authors write stories. Sometimes it’s to share a little bit of magic in a practical world. Sometimes it’s cathartic, a release of pent up emotions and hurts that others can identify and share. Sometimes it’s to take a break from the harsh realities and escape in a bit of fantasy. Sometimes it’s a vehicle used to spread a message, a moral code, a bit of wisdom or advice to pass down to the next generation. There are many reasons. In history, story-telling was very crucial to the development and understanding of humanity’s way of life, passing down traditions, values and knowledge to educate and survive. Today, with the easy access to self-publishing and lowering of standards of excellence by traditional publishing, bookshelves and eBook readers are being filled most often with sensationalized stories, demoralizing values and re-telling of superficial history. I’m guilty of a bit of this myself. But, it has me wondering what future generations will look like because of this practice. It also caused me to pause and re-evaluate the stories I read. R.T. Kaelin has reminded me in his Children of the White Lions series of what it was that first had me fall in love with reading as a child. It’s not full of sensationalism, pushing the boundaries of the moral code, or even re-writing history to fit modern-day ideals. It’s about coming-of-age magic, destiny and first loves. It’s about discovering who you are, regardless of what you’re told. It’s about facing fears and adversity, but finding the strength to overcome them within yourself – not waiting on a superhero to swoop down out of the sky to rescue you – most often from your own messes. It’s about failing and finding the courage to get back up. All these wonderful elements are brilliantly placed within a beautiful story centered on two brave teenaged boys and their rambunctious sister. Surrounding the central heroes are powerful minor characters, full of flaws, beauty, scars and well-developed personalities, along with a refreshing and straight forward magical system, and a battle for dominance from an imperfect and fallible antagonist. This story isn’t just about the battles, the quest, freedom from oppression or victory of the war, but it’s about the lives that are involved. This is a character-driven story, my favorite kind. Kaelin stays true to the youth and inexperience of the main characters, allowing plenty of room for growth and development through the series. I absolutely love them all – including many of the minor characters. I would recommend this book from young adult (10yrs – up) to adult. It’s a wonderful story of loss, love, and leadership. It’s a great example of reluctant heroes rising to the greatness that’s been thrust upon them. It’s clean, it’s magical and it leaves the reader with hope instead of despair. I can’t wait to read more. Till next time, ~T.L. Gray Author of the Arcainian Series

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    I am a personal acquaintance of the author, although I have not seen or talked to him in over 3 years. When I saw he was on Twitter, I was intrigued he was listed as an Author. A click through to his website and a brief read of the Prologue, and I bought my copy. After reading a few of the reviews, I believe I bought the second edition of this book after Kaelin cut out a bunch of text. Although I found it to be an extremely good read, I felt like I missed a little too much of the back story. I'd I am a personal acquaintance of the author, although I have not seen or talked to him in over 3 years. When I saw he was on Twitter, I was intrigued he was listed as an Author. A click through to his website and a brief read of the Prologue, and I bought my copy. After reading a few of the reviews, I believe I bought the second edition of this book after Kaelin cut out a bunch of text. Although I found it to be an extremely good read, I felt like I missed a little too much of the back story. I'd have to get my hands on a first edition to find out for sure. I'm probably not a typical reader as I personally like books with a lot of character history in them. I originally felt that the development of the characters was missing something. I couldn't quite put my finger on it, but after Kaelin sent me an updated copy of the book, what was missing was easy to read. The characters are human, I felt their losses, their achievements, and I felt involved in their inter-relationships. I laughed, I cried, I found myslef clutching my Kindle reader until my hands cramped, and I lost sleep because I was spending time reading this book. Other than the yearning for more character history, this book is absolutely wonderful! I love the story, the characters, their relationships, and how the story is unfolding. Progeny gives you the sense all through the book that you're waiting for something, but you don't know exactly what. That makes for thrilling reading in my opinion. I would have liked to see a few more chapters end teetering on a cliff, but I devoured the book nonetheless. I also like Kaelin's spin on magic. I read another review that said this story wasn't original and that it borrowed a lot from other stories. I challenge that reviewer to find any new author writing fantasy with even 50% originality. I felt this book was a new story with familiar elements, but also had new ones I've never read before, which makes it fresh and new in its own right, and I personally feel that Kaelin achieved more than 50% originality. Everyone seems to like to compare new authors with established authors, so here goes. I've seen other reviews where Kaelin is compared to Tolkien and J. K. Rowling, but I personally don't think those make for good comparisons. I feel his writing style is much different that Tolkien, and Rowling's writing is for a bit of a different audience. Not to say that if you liked Tolkien and Rowling (which I do), you wouldn't like Kaelin, just that they're different. If I were to put Kaelin somewhere, I'd put David Eddings, Robert Jordan, and Terry Brooks in a triangle and put Kaelin somewhere off-center closest to Jordan and Brooks (if that makes any sense). Overall I would recommend this book to anyone who likes Fantasy. As a matter of fact, I have. I am waiting for the second book in the series with much anticipation.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shane Amazon

    I must admit that Fantasy books are not a realm of which I venture into often. I prefer to be lost in the stars where my heroes slay their enemy with a saber of light or the heat of a phaser instead of a sword cast from sweat and steel. That being said, I had been given the opportunity to read this book by a person I have come to call a friend and today I consider myself quite lucky that I was given the chance to read such incredible work. Progeny, from its first page had grabbed a hold of me lik I must admit that Fantasy books are not a realm of which I venture into often. I prefer to be lost in the stars where my heroes slay their enemy with a saber of light or the heat of a phaser instead of a sword cast from sweat and steel. That being said, I had been given the opportunity to read this book by a person I have come to call a friend and today I consider myself quite lucky that I was given the chance to read such incredible work. Progeny, from its first page had grabbed a hold of me like few books have in the past. Its story reached out from the pages like hands wrapped in white pulp and covered in the black print to which the story spoke. The authors creativeness and passion spilled forth like a dam that had burst, sending its waters to flood my imagination. The writing was effortless to read and every word had been perfectly chosen to convey the story's elements of emotion, suspense, struggle, turmoil, adventure, and family. Storytelling that molds the reader from characters that are as real as you and I are what make Progeny such a compelling piece of literature. The author speaks to the reader as if its just you and him sitting by the light of a campfire. His words full of whimsy as he tells the tale of three young adults finding themselves while the world around them collapses, forcing us to care for them as if they were family. Aided by a teacher of great wisdom and experience, the three struggle against an unknown enemy, finding the only key to His defeat deep within themselves. Along the way strangers will come to offer their aid only to be forced to offer their lives. Many comparisons can be made to other works and perhaps R.T. Kaelins epic adventure will be mentioned in the same breath as J.R. Tolkien or George R.R. Martin but for me R.T. Kaelin has built a solid and unforgettable story that has the strength to stand on its own. Kaelin's creativity and ability to weave such intricate and complex story arcs have earned himself a lifetime fan that will always be searching for more and more; and in the end that is all that any writer can strive for, after all the old saying goes "Always leave them wanting more.". That is the only real measuring stick to true success and Progeny measures well. I would also like to send my gratitude to Donna Overall and Terrene Press for helping to produce such incredible work(and so little errors). With over 650 pages of outstanding storytelling I was very impressed with the words found on the very last page "Made in America". I look forward to the next installment and the Hardcover printing as well(hopefully before the 25th anniversary).

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Why I stopped reading this book: I read a lot, and almost all of it is fantasy. I tend to avoid epic fantasy, though, because it's so often the same story tediously retold at unnecessary length. I pick up a book, read the blurb, and see one (often more than one) of the following described, and I quickly put it down again. Epic fantasy plot #1: The Chosen One must find the Lost McGuffin in order to defeat the Dark Lord, who… [at this point I stop reading] Epic fantasy plot #2: A corrupt empire is at Why I stopped reading this book: I read a lot, and almost all of it is fantasy. I tend to avoid epic fantasy, though, because it's so often the same story tediously retold at unnecessary length. I pick up a book, read the blurb, and see one (often more than one) of the following described, and I quickly put it down again. Epic fantasy plot #1: The Chosen One must find the Lost McGuffin in order to defeat the Dark Lord, who… [at this point I stop reading] Epic fantasy plot #2: A corrupt empire is at war with cruel barbarian kingdoms, and someone of low status must… [at this point I stop reading] Epic fantasy plot #3: A naive youngster suffers the loss of his/her parents when their village is destroyed, and his/her quest for vengeance/understanding/a place to belong is complicated when he/she discovers powers which nobody must know about. Along the way, he/she finds unlikely companions, who… [at this point I stop reading] Progeny is, clearly, Epic Fantasy Plot #3. Strike one. Another of my pet peeves about fantasy in general is something which I probably should just reconcile myself to, because so many people do it. Tad Williams does it, Tamora Pierce does it, Nathan Lowell does it. And R.T. Kaelin does it. I'm referring to the practice of creating a world in which the dominant religion (usually the only religion) is a form of polytheism or paganism, in which neither Judaism nor Christianity has ever existed -- and then giving your characters biblical names like "Rachael" and "Marie". (Giving them strange spellings, like "Nikalys", doesn't help.) My view of this is that it's either laziness or ignorance, or both. That may be too harsh. This may be something only I care about. But in any case, strike two. Strike three - the thing which caused me to set the book gently aside, because after all I don't want to hurl my Kindle across the room - concerns basic astronomy. Very basic astronomy. Basic geometry, really. Fantasy authors, if you must have more than one moon (and, really, must you?), please take 30 seconds with Google and find out how moon phases work. The phase of the moon is created by the angle between the planet, the moon, and the sun. A full moon appears when the sun is on the other side of the planet from the moon, so it is illuminating the side that faces us. A new moon appears when the sun is on the same side of the planet as the moon, so it is illuminating the side that doesn't face us. This means that a full moon and a new moon will not be in the sky at the same time. And, you're out.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...