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NET Bible - Limited Edition with CD

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7,722 notes, full color satellite map section, large print, premium leather, sewn binding and gilded edges.


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7,722 notes, full color satellite map section, large print, premium leather, sewn binding and gilded edges.

30 review for NET Bible - Limited Edition with CD

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Stieffel

    I got this Bible free in the Olive Tree Bible Study app on my iPad. (Love that app, by the way.) The translation was crowdsourced, which explains why it's inconsistent in places. The editors show a propensity toward cliches, e.g., Isaiah 64:11, "all our prized possessions have been destroyed," where a note indicates the alternate translation as "all that we valued has become a ruin." Given the choice between the two, why would an editor prefer the hackneyed old set phrase "prized possessions" ove I got this Bible free in the Olive Tree Bible Study app on my iPad. (Love that app, by the way.) The translation was crowdsourced, which explains why it's inconsistent in places. The editors show a propensity toward cliches, e.g., Isaiah 64:11, "all our prized possessions have been destroyed," where a note indicates the alternate translation as "all that we valued has become a ruin." Given the choice between the two, why would an editor prefer the hackneyed old set phrase "prized possessions" over something plain, simple, and more literal? Other times, though, the translators appear to be needlessly striving for originality. In Habakkuk 2:14, for example, they write: "For recognition of the Lord s sovereign majesty will fill the earth just as the waters fill up the sea." The footnote shows the literal translation: Heb. "for the earth will be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord, just as the waters cover over the sea." The poetic meter of the original has been eradicated in the translation, and for no good reason I can discern. The translators have a journalist-like aversion to metaphor. Deuteronomy 26:8 reads, "Therefore the LORD brought us out of Egypt with tremendous strength and power(a), as well as with great awe-inspiring signs and wonders." Note (a) then says, "Heb. 'by a powerful hand and an extended arm.' These are anthropomorphisms designed to convey God's tremendously great power…They are preserved literally in many English versions (cf. KJV, NAB, NIV, NRSV). Well, yeah. I suppose that's why those translations are among the most widely used. I'd rather have the literal translation with an explanatory footnote than the other way around. Diction choices are very odd indeed. There seems to be an excessive concern about helping "modern" readers understand the text, which results in pointless things like Jeremiah 13:1 describing his "linen shorts." I trust that modern readers are not so dense as to be unaware of what a loincloth is. Elsewhere, the plans for the temple are called "blueprints," a whopping anachronism. The translators' notes are copious, almost overwhelmingly so. But I do like seeing the thought process. The notes often highlight occasions when the translators have taken liberties with sentence structure. The notes will cite a verse or verses and then note that they are "one long sentence in Hebrew. The translation divides this into two sentences for stylistic reasons." In one place, they have left what they consider a "long" sentence, with this explanation: "The length of this sentence runs contrary to the normal policy followed in the translation of breaking up long sentences. However, there does not seem any way to break it up here without losing the connections." The sentence in question is Jer. 15:4 -- "I will make all the people in all the kingdoms of the world horrified at what has happened to them because of what Hezekiah's son Manasseh, king of Judah, did in Jerusalem.” Now, is that really so long? It's not unwieldy. This aversion to long sentences and the anachronistic diction choices lead me to believe that this translation is aimed at readers with lower skill levels, e.g., young people and those for whom English is a second language. Yet the notes are highly scholarly, often delving deep into fine points of Hebrew and Greek grammar. For example, here's the note on Jer. 31:19 -- "For this meaning of the verb see HAL 374 s. v. ידע Nif 5 or W. L. Holladay, Concise Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon, 129. REB translates "Now that I am submissive" relating the verb to a second root meaning "be submissive." (See HALOT 375 s. v. II ידע and J. Barr, Comparative Philology and the Text of the Old Testament, 19- 21, for evidence for this verb. Other passages cited with this nuance are Judg 8:16; Prov 10:9; Job 20:20.)" I have no idea what half of that even means, and I'm a pretty skilled reader. But not in Hebrew. The notes are sometimes written so much for those with a seminary education that they are out of reach of ordinary laypersons. For example, on Mark 1:31, "...the fever left her and she began to serve (a) them," where note (a) says, "The imperfect verb is taken ingressively here." Not knowing Greek, either, I have no idea what an ingressive verb is or why it matters. So I'm not quite sure what to make of the NET. As a Bible study leader, I find the scholarly notes helpful, albeit over my head at times. But because of the tendency of the text toward oversimplification and paraphrase, I'm not likely to use it in class.

  2. 4 out of 5

    slaveofone

    Best Bible translation available! Unlike other modern Bibles, this is not a revision of a previous translation--but new from the ground up by specialists across the world. Although similar to (but better than) the NIV in its dynamic translation, the bulk consists of various note types like the Text Critical, which gives a strict/literal rendering as alternative. Detailed notes explain the reason why each verse was translated as it was, clues you in to linguistic, scholastic, and theological issu Best Bible translation available! Unlike other modern Bibles, this is not a revision of a previous translation--but new from the ground up by specialists across the world. Although similar to (but better than) the NIV in its dynamic translation, the bulk consists of various note types like the Text Critical, which gives a strict/literal rendering as alternative. Detailed notes explain the reason why each verse was translated as it was, clues you in to linguistic, scholastic, and theological issues, and lets you decide for yourself how best to understand it. It therefore functions both as an easy-reading and hard-core study Bible. Plus full color satellite maps of the Holy Land! I didn't give it 5 stars because the pages stick due to the gold spray on the edges and the printed edition doesn't come with the Apocrypha.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dina (ReviewTime)

    Please Note: I'm assuming that this listing is for the First edition NET Study Bible. About the Binding & Cover This edition is made from smooth finished Cromwell Premium Bonded Leather, with a Premium Smythe sewn binding. The cover has a smooth leathery feel, and rich color. Bonded leather is made from tiny bits of leather reformed together with latex binders to create one sold sheet of leather. Depending on the quality bonded leather is composed of 80% to 100% leather fibers. Bonded leather does Please Note: I'm assuming that this listing is for the First edition NET Study Bible. About the Binding & Cover This edition is made from smooth finished Cromwell Premium Bonded Leather, with a Premium Smythe sewn binding. The cover has a smooth leathery feel, and rich color. Bonded leather is made from tiny bits of leather reformed together with latex binders to create one sold sheet of leather. Depending on the quality bonded leather is composed of 80% to 100% leather fibers. Bonded leather doesn't last as long as Genuine Leather, but does certainly out lasts other types of covers. Smythe sewn binding is considered the highest quality binding, the pages are sewn and glued to the spine of the Bible. The benefits are a long lasting Bible that can be read and reread for years without falling apart. Books with Smythe sewn binding will stand up to more abuse than regular glued binding, and can be read on a flat surface. For these reasons many textbooks, picture books and Bibles that are designed to stand the tests of time use Smythe sewn binding. Smythe sewn book printing and binding gets its name from its inventor, an Irish-American named David McConnell Smythe (1833-1807). A pioneer of modern day bookbinding, Smythe took a bold leap forward over the centuries old methods of binding by producing the first technology and methods for sewing book pages to the spine to create a book of superior quality and appearance. Smythe-sewn Bibles are durable, but they may be heavier and less flexible than glued Bibles. That said if you want the best, then you want Smythe sewn binding. Size: 9.75 X 7.0 X 2.25 What’s inside? This Bible is printed on Premium Bible paper, the text is clear 9 point type, the translators' notes are 7.5 point type text. The lay out of this Bible is double column format, black letter edition, with paragraph/subject headings. Features include 60,932 extensive translators' notes (more translators' notes than any other Bible in history), detailed table of contents, glossary of terms, 12 full color satellite maps, 8 full color pictures, 6 maps depicting the old testament periods, and 4 Journeys of Paul line maps. This edition has gold gilded page edges, which adds to the traditional elegance of this Bible. Along with this Bible is included a bonus Companion CD which is a very well featured program. Preview John chapter 1 of the First Edition http://www.bible.org/assets/netbible/... In the Front 1. Preface to the First Edition 2. Introduction to the First Edition 3. Books of the Bible in Canonical Order In the Back 1. NET Bible Principles of Translation 2. Abbreviations 3. List of Cited Works 4. Principal Manuscript Evidence for the Greek New Testament 5. Hebrew and Greek Translation 6. Detailed Table of Contents 7. Index to NET Bible Maps Contents of the Companion CD NET Bible * HTML version like the one online * HTML Help version - searchable (windows only) History of the English Bible Articles * Part I: From Wycliffe to King James (The Period of Challenge) * Part II: The Reign of the King James (The Era of Elegance) * Part III: From the KJV to the RV (from Elegance to Accuracy) * Part IV: Why So Many Versions? Making of the NET Bible Articles * Innovations in the Text and Translation of the NET Bible, New Testament * An Open Letter Regarding The NET Bible, New Testament * Consideration of Contexts in the Translation Philosophy of the NET Bible: Discussion and Examples Studying the Bible Section * Finding God - a brief explanation of God’s plan of salvation * The Basics of the Faith - A question and answer Bible study series * Introduction to Christian Belief - A layman’s guide to systematic theology * How to Study the Bible ($15 book) - covers the place of the Bible in the life of the Christian, key components of Bible study, and different kinds of Bible study. * How to Teach the Bible - Shows you how to begin to communicate what you’ve learned in your study of the Bible to other people. Gospel of John Tools * Audio version of Gospel of John * Pastor's Commentary on John - Bob Deffinbaugh * Technical Commentary on John - Hall Harris Reference Tools: * Introductions, Outlines and Arguments of whole New Testament - extensive background materials * Easton's Bible Dictionary * Nave's Topical Bible * Torrey's Topical Textbook * Matthew Henry's Commentary About this Translation This information is from "Preface To The NET Bible http://www.bible.org/page.php?page_id... " if you would like to learn more about this translation please refer to the above address."The NET Bible is a completely new translation of the Bible with 60,932 translators’ notes! (The translators' notes can be found online and in the printed First Edition) It was completed by more than 25 scholars – experts in the original biblical languages – who worked directly from the best currently available Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts. The translators’ notes make the original languages far more accessible, allowing you to look over the translator’s shoulder at the very process of translation. This level of documentation is a first for a Bible translation, making transparent the textual basis and the rationale for key renderings (including major interpretive options and alternative translations). This unparalleled level of detail helps connect people to the Bible in the original languages in a way never before possible without years of study of Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek. It unlocks the riches of the Bible’s truth from entirely new perspectives. The Deutero-Canonical books/Apocrypha are not completely translated yet and are not certainly in the printed editions. Plans are underway to translate these books the translators' of the Net Bible seek to create a translation which all Christians can use regardless of denomination. The Net Bible can be found online at http://net.bible.org/or go to http://www.blogger.com/www.bible.org for a free downloadable copy. A short video about the NET Bible Watch Preface to the Net Bible First Edition http://www.bible.org/page.php?page_id... My Personal Opinion Many would assume that this edition is meant especially for those in ministry or those who know the original languages but this isn't the case. The translators' notes of the first Edition are meant to help people get a better idea of what the original languages said and of the translation process that went into the NET Bible. Personally I love the extensive translators' notes of this edition, they are very useful and interesting. Even though I can't read Hebrew, Aramaic, or Greek I still find the notes fascinating and comprehensible, although I'm sure someone with knowledge of the the original languages would find this edition even more helpful. Many times I find myself using this Bible along side other study Bibles to get a better idea of what the original languages said. This edition lays flat while reading, which is very helpful when studying or while comparing translations. The Net Bible First Edition is a good choice for study because of the extensive translators' notes and the wonderful maps.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dina (ReviewTime)

    About the Binding & Cover This edition is made from smooth finished Cromwell Premium Bonded Leather, with a Premium Smythe sewn binding. The cover has a smooth leathery feel, and rich color. Bonded leather is made from tiny bits of leather reformed together with latex binders to create one sold sheet of leather. Depending on the quality bonded leather is composed of 80% to 100% leather fibers. Bonded leather doesn't last as long as Genuine Leather, but does certainly out lasts other types of cove About the Binding & Cover This edition is made from smooth finished Cromwell Premium Bonded Leather, with a Premium Smythe sewn binding. The cover has a smooth leathery feel, and rich color. Bonded leather is made from tiny bits of leather reformed together with latex binders to create one sold sheet of leather. Depending on the quality bonded leather is composed of 80% to 100% leather fibers. Bonded leather doesn't last as long as Genuine Leather, but does certainly out lasts other types of covers. Smythe sewn binding is considered the highest quality binding, the pages are sewn and glued to the spine of the Bible. The benefits are a long lasting Bible that can be read and reread for years without falling apart. Books with Smythe sewn binding will stand up to more abuse than regular glued binding, and can be read on a flat surface. For these reasons many textbooks, picture books and Bibles that are designed to stand the tests of time use Smythe sewn binding. Smythe sewn book printing and binding gets its name from its inventor, an Irish-American named David McConnell Smythe (1833-1807). A pioneer of modern day bookbinding, Smythe took a bold leap forward over the centuries old methods of binding by producing the first technology and methods for sewing book pages to the spine to create a book of superior quality and appearance. Smythe-sewn Bibles are durable, but they may be heavier and less flexible than glued Bibles. That said if you want the best, then you want Smythe sewn binding. Size: 6.75 x 4.5 in What’s inside? This Bible is printed on Premium Bible paper, the text is clear 8 point type, the translators' notes are 5.5 point type text. The lay out of this Bible is double column format, black letter edition, with paragraph/subject headings. Features include 7,722 condensed translators' notes, glossary of terms, Concordance with over 6300 entries/references covering more than 1000 key biblical terms, detailed table of contents, Bible Answers to Life Questions, On Prayer section a resource that lists more than 25 passages about prayer, Scripture Memory Verses, NET Bible Maps six Old Testament Maps, four Journeys of Paul Maps and two brand new New Testament Maps. This edition has gold gilded page edges. Along with this Bible is included a bonus Companion CD which is a very well featured program. Preview John chapter 1 of the Compact Edition http://www.bible.org/assets/netbible/... In the Front 1. Preface to the Compact Edition 2. Introduction to the Compact Edition 3. The NET Bible Team 4. Books of the Bible in Canonical Order In the Back 1. Glossary of Terms 2. Compact Concordance 3. Principles of Translation 4. Bible Answers to Life Questions (Preview at http://www.bible.org/page.php?page_id... ) 5. On Prayer (located online at http://www.bible.org/page.php?page_id... ) 6. Scripture Memory Verses 7. Detailed Table of Contents 8. Index to NET Bible Maps-Black and White New & Old Testament Maps Contents of the Companion CD NET Bible * HTML version like the one online * HTML Help version - searchable (windows only) History of the English Bible Articles * Part I: From Wycliffe to King James (The Period of Challenge) * Part II: The Reign of the King James (The Era of Elegance) * Part III: From the KJV to the RV (from Elegance to Accuracy) * Part IV: Why So Many Versions? Making of the NET Bible Articles * Innovations in the Text and Translation of the NET Bible, New Testament * An Open Letter Regarding The NET Bible, New Testament * Consideration of Contexts in the Translation Philosophy of the NET Bible: Discussion and Examples Studying the Bible Section * Finding God - a brief explanation of God’s plan of salvation * The Basics of the Faith - A question and answer Bible study series * Introduction to Christian Belief - A layman’s guide to systematic theology * How to Study the Bible ($15 book) - covers the place of the Bible in the life of the Christian, key components of Bible study, and different kinds of Bible study. * How to Teach the Bible - Shows you how to begin to communicate what you’ve learned in your study of the Bible to other people. Gospel of John Tools * Audio version of Gospel of John * Pastor's Commentary on John - Bob Deffinbaugh * Technical Commentary on John - Hall Harris Reference Tools: * Introductions, Outlines and Arguments of whole New Testament - extensive background materials * Easton's Bible Dictionary * Nave's Topical Bible * Torrey's Topical Textbook * Matthew Henry's Commentary About this Translation This information is from "Preface To The NET Bible http://www.bible.org/page.php?page_id... " if you would like to learn more about this translation please refer to the above address."The NET Bible is a completely new translation of the Bible with 60,932 translators’ notes! (The translators' notes can be found online and in the printed First Edition) It was completed by more than 25 scholars – experts in the original biblical languages – who worked directly from the best currently available Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts. The translators’ notes make the original languages far more accessible, allowing you to look over the translator’s shoulder at the very process of translation. This level of documentation is a first for a Bible translation, making transparent the textual basis and the rationale for key renderings (including major interpretive options and alternative translations). This unparalleled level of detail helps connect people to the Bible in the original languages in a way never before possible without years of study of Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek. It unlocks the riches of the Bible’s truth from entirely new perspectives. The Deutero-Canonical books/Apocrypha are not completely translated yet and are not certainly in the printed editions. Plans are underway to translate these books the translators' of the Net Bible seek to create a translation which all Christians can use regardless of denomination. The Net Bible can be found online at http://net.bible.org/or go to http://www.blogger.com/www.bible.org for a free downloadable copy. A short video about the NET Bible Watch More Information about the Net Bible Compact Edition http://www.bible.org/page.php?page_id... My Personal Opinion This Bible has clear, easy to read text, which is always nice to see in a compact edition. I would like to point out that the size of this edition is 6.75" x 4.5", as you can tell from the photo I have very small hands which makes this Bible look larger than it actually is. The features of this edition such as the Compact Concordance, Bible Answers to Life Questions, On Prayer section, and Scripture Memory Verses section makes this Bible a very useful compact edition.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Todd Miles

    NB: My four-star rating is not for the content, but for the translation. From a devotional standpoint, this translation was not my favorite. At times it was too dynamic - giving longer explanatory translations for familiar terms (e.g., "The Lord who commands armies" for the more familiar "The Lord of Hosts"). The great benefit of the NET Bible is, of course, the footnotes. It works well in a digital format. NB: My four-star rating is not for the content, but for the translation. From a devotional standpoint, this translation was not my favorite. At times it was too dynamic - giving longer explanatory translations for familiar terms (e.g., "The Lord who commands armies" for the more familiar "The Lord of Hosts"). The great benefit of the NET Bible is, of course, the footnotes. It works well in a digital format.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Pam Larson

    I generally prefer the more literal (formal equivalence) translations and dislike non-literal (dynamic equivalence) translations. NET Bible is the best of both worlds, since the notes give the literal translations and the explanations for why they translated the way they did. They also avoid ideological gender inclusivity (my biggest gripe about the NRSV).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    As a translation, the NET Bible is OK. Sometimes it is odd, sometimes it is idiomatic, sometimes it is wooden. Sometimes it is painfully obvious that different people were primarily responsible for different books. Overall, it is OK—no better or worse. The notes, however, are very good. They contain gems of helpful information ranging from connections to other parts of scripture to translation issues to cultural background and textual criticism. One caveat is there is a clear evangelical bias. Th As a translation, the NET Bible is OK. Sometimes it is odd, sometimes it is idiomatic, sometimes it is wooden. Sometimes it is painfully obvious that different people were primarily responsible for different books. Overall, it is OK—no better or worse. The notes, however, are very good. They contain gems of helpful information ranging from connections to other parts of scripture to translation issues to cultural background and textual criticism. One caveat is there is a clear evangelical bias. That may not bother you, but it is something to be aware of.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    This Bible, although sometimes awkward in its wording, is full of great notes to help us understand the Scriptures better through textual criticism, text notes, and study notes. A great resource to have at hand.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    Great Bible for a serious student. It is a highly interpretive translation but has tens of thousands of notes explaining their basis for every choice.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dina (ReviewTime)

    About the Binding & Cover This edition is made from Cromwell Premium Top Grain Genuine Leather, with a Premium Smythe sewn binding. The cover has a fine leathery feel, rich color, and well defined grain. Top Grain leather is considered the second highest grade of leather, and is as strong and durable as full grain leather. This type of leather is split from the top layer of the hide, sanded and then refinished. Smythe sewn binding is considered the highest quality binding, the pages are sewn and About the Binding & Cover This edition is made from Cromwell Premium Top Grain Genuine Leather, with a Premium Smythe sewn binding. The cover has a fine leathery feel, rich color, and well defined grain. Top Grain leather is considered the second highest grade of leather, and is as strong and durable as full grain leather. This type of leather is split from the top layer of the hide, sanded and then refinished. Smythe sewn binding is considered the highest quality binding, the pages are sewn and glued to the spine of the Bible. The benefits are a long lasting Bible that can be read and reread for years without falling apart. Books with Smythe sewn binding will stand up to more abuse than regular glued binding, and can be read on a flat surface. For these reasons many textbooks, picture books and Bibles that are designed to stand the tests of time use Smythe sewn binding. Smythe sewn book printing and binding gets its name from its inventor, an Irish-American named David McConnell Smythe (1833-1807). A pioneer of modern day bookbinding, Smythe took a bold leap forward over the centuries old methods of binding by producing the first technology and methods for sewing book pages to the spine to create a book of superior quality and appearance. Smythe-sewn Bibles are durable, but they may be heavier and less flexible than glued Bibles. That said if you want the best, then you want Smythe sewn binding. Size: 9.75 X 7.0 X 1.5 (inches) What’s inside? This Bible is printed on Premium Bible paper, the text is clear 11-point type text. The lay out of this Bible is double column format, black letter edition, with paragraph/subject headings. Features include 7,722 condensed translators' notes, a glossary of terms, 12 full color satellite maps, 8 full color pictures, 6 maps depicting the old testament periods, and 4 Journeys of Paul line maps. This edition includes a Premium black ribbon marker, and gold gilded page edges, which adds to the elegance of this Bible. Preview John chapter 1 of the Reader's Edition http://www.bible.org/assets/netbible/... In the Front 1. Preface to the Reader's Edition 2. Introduction to the Reader's Edition 3. The NET Bible Team 4. Books of the Bible in Canonical Order In the Back 1. Glossary of Terms 2. Principles of Translation 3. Detailed Table of Contents 4. Index to NET Bible Maps Along with this Bible is included a bonus Companion CD which has many features. Contents of the Companion CD NET Bible * HTML version like the one online * HTML Help version - searchable (windows only) History of the English Bible Articles * Part I: From Wycliffe to King James (The Period of Challenge) * Part II: The Reign of the King James (The Era of Elegance) * Part III: From the KJV to the RV (from Elegance to Accuracy) * Part IV: Why So Many Versions? Making of the NET Bible Articles * Innovations in the Text and Translation of the NET Bible, New Testament * An Open Letter Regarding The NET Bible, New Testament * Consideration of Contexts in the Translation Philosophy of the NET Bible: Discussion and Examples Studying the Bible Section * Finding God - a brief explanation of God’s plan of salvation * The Basics of the Faith - A question and answer Bible study series * Introduction to Christian Belief - A layman’s guide to systematic theology * How to Study the Bible ($15 book) - covers the place of the Bible in the life of the Christian, key components of Bible study, and different kinds of Bible study. * How to Teach the Bible - Shows you how to begin to communicate what you’ve learned in your study of the Bible to other people. Gospel of John Tools * Audio version of Gospel of John * Pastor's Commentary on John - Bob Deffinbaugh * Technical Commentary on John - Hall Harris Reference Tools: * Introductions, Outlines and Arguments of whole New Testament - extensive background materials * Easton's Bible Dictionary * Nave's Topical Bible * Torrey's Topical Textbook * Matthew Henry's Commentary About this Translation This information is from "Preface To The NET Bible http://www.bible.org/page.php?page_id... " if you would like to learn more about this translation please refer to the above address."The NET Bible is a completely new translation of the Bible with 60,932 translators’ notes! (The translators' notes can be found online and in the printed First Edition) It was completed by more than 25 scholars – experts in the original biblical languages – who worked directly from the best currently available Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts. The translators’ notes make the original languages far more accessible, allowing you to look over the translator’s shoulder at the very process of translation. This level of documentation is a first for a Bible translation, making transparent the textual basis and the rationale for key renderings (including major interpretive options and alternative translations). This unparalleled level of detail helps connect people to the Bible in the original languages in a way never before possible without years of study of Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek. It unlocks the riches of the Bible’s truth from entirely new perspectives. The Deutero-Canonical books/Apocrypha are not completely translated yet and are not certainly in the printed editions. Plans are underway to translate these books the translators' of the Net Bible seek to create a translation which all Christians can use regardless of denomination. The Net Bible can be found online at http://net.bible.org/or go to http://www.blogger.com/www.bible.org for a free downloadable copy. Introduction to the Net Bible Reader's Edition http://www.bible.org/page.php?page_id... My Personal Opinion The cover has a very nice leathery feel and texture, I understand now why many of my friends say "When you get a Genuine leather Bible you don't want to put it down". This Bible lays flat while reading, I've found this to be very helpful when studying or while comparing different translations. The Reader's Edition would be a good choice for devotional reading or study, because of the text size and the condensed translators' notes. Personally I find the translators' notes to be very interesting and helpful, giving a deeper understanding in to the possible translations.

  11. 4 out of 5

    DR

    I don't know how many times I've read the Bible nor the different translations. This translation is my preference for many reasons. I'm familiar with some of the members of the translation team because they were my professors at the seminary I attended. There's shock and awe, fear and loathing, and lots of redeeming love. I do hope in some distant future the Apocrapha (middle books between the Hebrew and Greek texts) is added for a more full-bodied read. I don't know how many times I've read the Bible nor the different translations. This translation is my preference for many reasons. I'm familiar with some of the members of the translation team because they were my professors at the seminary I attended. There's shock and awe, fear and loathing, and lots of redeeming love. I do hope in some distant future the Apocrapha (middle books between the Hebrew and Greek texts) is added for a more full-bodied read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ronnie Nichols

    This is a decent translation. I used it for a through the Bible in one year plan and found it better than adequate. I did not use any of the footnotes or study helps, but simply read the text. The English is very reader friendly and although I did not come across anything that stood out as unorthodox, I did find several passages in the OT in particular that I felt missed the mark. I'll keep a copy for future reference, but it won't be a "go to" source. This is a decent translation. I used it for a through the Bible in one year plan and found it better than adequate. I did not use any of the footnotes or study helps, but simply read the text. The English is very reader friendly and although I did not come across anything that stood out as unorthodox, I did find several passages in the OT in particular that I felt missed the mark. I'll keep a copy for future reference, but it won't be a "go to" source.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    There are a few goofy moments throughout, but I found this translation to be one of the more readable versions, with ample notation specifically on translation (as opposed to typical study Bible sorts of notes). I'm sure there are plenty of quibbles to be found with the looser translation employed here, but this version is certainly one to be in the rotation. There are a few goofy moments throughout, but I found this translation to be one of the more readable versions, with ample notation specifically on translation (as opposed to typical study Bible sorts of notes). I'm sure there are plenty of quibbles to be found with the looser translation employed here, but this version is certainly one to be in the rotation.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    The NET Bible is an excellent and readable translation with outstanding notes. I read in the electronic version which made the Bible manageable with immediate access to the notes. Some of the notes cite very old literature, thus most readers will be unable to access articles that are cited in them. Overall this is an excellent choice for those planning to read through the Bible in a year.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Steven Rongley

    An excellent, high fidelity, and very transparent translation. However, in parts it loses the flow and feel of other translations (ESV, KJV) for the sake of linguistic precision. This is not necessarily a disadvantage or problem because of the goals of this translation, but it is important to note.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Butler

    Can't put a rating on this one. At times the best book ever, and at times the worst :) I do like this version because it gives context and alternative translations in the notes. It's good to be reminded that there's nuance and uncertainty. Can't put a rating on this one. At times the best book ever, and at times the worst :) I do like this version because it gives context and alternative translations in the notes. It's good to be reminded that there's nuance and uncertainty.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    6th audio Bible for the year, This one took longer, because I had Audible Plus for a short while and wanted to make sure I listened through a lot of titles, but got distracted on getting back to this one.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Trautman

    3 stars for the translation

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Keiser

    Took me awhile, but my first reading of the Bible in its entirety. I read it in order, Genesis to Revelation. God’s word is living and active.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Peter Clegg

    I can’t say enough good things about this translation. It reads very well and I have grown to love it almost as much as the ESV.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Poling

    eversion or online is the best- physical book is too heavy to carry around.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Katrina Beyond

    Trust the Process!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joe Hightower

    An excellent translation.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    I have completed my reading of the NET Bible in just over eight months and have come away with a favorable impression. There were several places where the gender-inclusive language made passages a little awkward in structure but none that I found were detrimental to the meaning of the passages themselves. The notes in the NET are first-rate. This is the only major modern translation that I am aware of that gives you so much insight into the thoughts and decisions of the translators and why they we I have completed my reading of the NET Bible in just over eight months and have come away with a favorable impression. There were several places where the gender-inclusive language made passages a little awkward in structure but none that I found were detrimental to the meaning of the passages themselves. The notes in the NET are first-rate. This is the only major modern translation that I am aware of that gives you so much insight into the thoughts and decisions of the translators and why they went with the translations they did. The notes also give you many different alternate readings from other translations as comparison. Many of the translators notes can be technical so I do suggest that advanced readers brush up on their ability to read Greek and/or Hebrew as there are quite a few notes where those languages are used. However, even with those, the notes are accessible and through. The NET Bible is a dynamically-equivalent translation but when used closely with the supplied notes, it quickly becomes formally-equivalent. I recommend the NET Bible for new believers and for seasoned believers as well. This version I am reviewing includes the full complement of 60,932 translators notes. I found this to be somewhat distracting since my main goal was to use this version for my reading through the Bible this year. If I were to read the NET again like this I would pick up a copy of the reader's edition which has only 7,722 condensed study notes. I would like to see a text only edition with minimal, if any, notes and see it printed in a single-column format and maybe with a wide-margin to boot. I hope this review is helpful to you.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Marsch

    I love the concept of this Bible, copyright free for the widest possible distribution, but that necessitates a kind of "committee translation" that sidesteps infringing on the copyrights of other well-known Bibles and thus losing some of their cohesiveness. I'll keep this one on my Kindle and hope for its wide distribution. It's difficult to click on the Kindle notes features without accidentally clicking something else. I love the concept of this Bible, copyright free for the widest possible distribution, but that necessitates a kind of "committee translation" that sidesteps infringing on the copyrights of other well-known Bibles and thus losing some of their cohesiveness. I'll keep this one on my Kindle and hope for its wide distribution. It's difficult to click on the Kindle notes features without accidentally clicking something else.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    Before I bought my Kindle I did research on Bibles for eReaders and this one seemed to come up as the best one. I've never read this translation but so far I'm liking it. I've used it along with the Sermon in church a couple of times now and really enjoyed reading Ecclesiastes 1-2 today in particular. The large number of footnotes are pretty nice. The OSNOVA "Direct Verse Jump" links make this Bible usable on the Kindle since I like to be able to quickly jump around to various passages. Before I bought my Kindle I did research on Bibles for eReaders and this one seemed to come up as the best one. I've never read this translation but so far I'm liking it. I've used it along with the Sermon in church a couple of times now and really enjoyed reading Ecclesiastes 1-2 today in particular. The large number of footnotes are pretty nice. The OSNOVA "Direct Verse Jump" links make this Bible usable on the Kindle since I like to be able to quickly jump around to various passages.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    I would be remiss by not including this. While I don't use the Kindle version, I have been using this for a Saturday study since it was first published. An excellent translation. The leather bound versions are durable and easy to read. And if you want translation notes rather than commentary notes, this is a great bible from which to study. I would be remiss by not including this. While I don't use the Kindle version, I have been using this for a Saturday study since it was first published. An excellent translation. The leather bound versions are durable and easy to read. And if you want translation notes rather than commentary notes, this is a great bible from which to study.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    Started in 2016 for a modified version of the How to Change Your Mind Bible reading plan (instead of using one translation for all the read-throughs, I'm using a different translation each time). Have read so far: Genesis - June-July 2016 Job - April-May 2017 Ruth - May 30, 2019 Started in 2016 for a modified version of the How to Change Your Mind Bible reading plan (instead of using one translation for all the read-throughs, I'm using a different translation each time). Have read so far: Genesis - June-July 2016 Job - April-May 2017 Ruth - May 30, 2019

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andre

    60,000+ translator/study notes what else needs to be said? I really like the translator notes as they give you a peek into the methodology and reasons why they translated crucial texts the way that they did and the give phenonminal and even-handed references throughout!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ginger Henderson

    This e version of The Good Book is more than just good. The linked TOC make it easy to find the passage I need when I need it. I love using it during church sermons, and I'm often at the place I need to be far before my paper flipping peers. An outstanding ebook, and one that I highly recommend. This e version of The Good Book is more than just good. The linked TOC make it easy to find the passage I need when I need it. I love using it during church sermons, and I'm often at the place I need to be far before my paper flipping peers. An outstanding ebook, and one that I highly recommend.

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